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Full text of "Newmarket Era and Express"



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■A MTH YEAIt EXKB^HOAIO OTH YEAR 



NO. 4? 



NEWMARKET, ONTARIO. THURSDAY, DECEMMR 6. 1951 






SINGLE COHB » CtNTS lAOf 



■*■*/•_ 



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Pee Wees Guests 



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ft 



tnsors-At 



Dinner Meeting 

Members of the Newmarket 
Optimist Pee-Wee baseball team 
who were in the Ontario finals 
this year, attended an Optimist 
clufc dinner meeting at the King 
George hotel on Tuesday night 
Rev. Don Churcher, in charge^of 
boys* work in Optimist district 
15, was guest speaker. 

Corporal Bill Denne, who re- 
turned from Korea recently, 
was a guest at the banquet and 
he described the country and 
some of his experiences as a 
soldier s with the Princess Patri- 
cias. Corporal Denne returned 
to Canada after he received 
wounds on his hands and arms 
in the Korea fighting. 

Other guests were Councillor 
Charles VanZant* Editor John 
Meyer and Bill Haskett. Mr. 
VaiiZant presented crests to 
members of the baseball team 
who lost out only in the final 
play-offs this year with Petrolia. 

There were 52 at the dinner 
meeting, 

NURSES TAKE COURSE 
ON CIVIL DEFENCE 

New medical techniques will 
make it possible to save thous- 
ands of lives, ev?n in the event 
of atomic attack, said instruc- 
tors of the course "Nursing in 
AJJ.C. Warfare" (atomic, bio- 
logic, and chemical warfare), at 
classes held in the parliament 
buildings and St. Michael's hos- 
pital, Toronto, for nurses from 
all parts of Ontario; Miss Verna 
A. Smyth, supervisor of Public 
Health Nursing, York County 
Health Unit, attended from New- 
market. 

The four-day course was led 

by a federal government team of 
three nurses, a physicist, and 
two medical consultants. Those 
present will in turn instruct 
other nurees, active and retired, 
In combating the effects of blast, 
beat and radiation. 

Miss Smyth said that in 1932 
further courses will probably be 
given to nurses. 



TAKE RECORD VOTES IN COUNCIL RACE 



ROD AND GUN CLUB 
HAS TURKEY DINNER 

The Newmarket Rod and Gun 
Club held a dinner meeting at 
the King George Hotel, attended 
by wives and representatives of 
business and industry, last Fri- 
day night A lovely turkey din- 
ner was served. 

A feature of the evening were 
presentations to Mrs. Bert Mor- 
rison and to club president, Al- 
bert Higginson. Guest speaker 
was S. A. Barnes of the conser- 
vation branch of the department 
of planning and development. 
He described the Importance of 
conserving water resources. 

Films were shown by conser- 
vation officers to wind up a 
thoroughly enjoyable evening. 



TRUMPET BAND TO 
PARADE SATURDAY 

A meeting of the executive of 
the Newmarket Trumpet Band 
was held in the town hall on 
Monday when plans were made 
for future growth. Roy Rein- 
hart and Frank Smith have of- 
fered their assistance in further 
developing the band. 

It was asserted that, contrary 
to rumor, the band had not dis- 
banded and would be playing in 
the Santa Clans parade. 




i 

Help Lions Club 

- 

Help Others At 
Christmas Time 



i 



Charles E. Boyd, Newmarket realtor, above, led the 
polls in Monday's election for council with 1,108 votes, the 
highest total ever polled in Newmarket Mrs, Violet Rob- 
inson MacNaughton, below, polled 1,064 votes, a figure 
which has never been reached in previous elections it is 
believed. Both candidates have lived in Newmarket all 
their lives. Mrs. MacNaughton, a conveyancer, has been 
in business for many years in Newmarket. 



__^ _^:_i _*. >— . o* -Si*. ■£*>**^- ^ &*- -mr?&i. ******** 




Contributions of $37 have been 

made towards the Newmarket 
JLions Christmas Basket Fund 
objective of $1,000 this week. 
The first contributions were 
from Thornton Bales, Sutton 
West, of $10; Frank VanMook, 
$2; Dixon Pencil Co., $25. 

The Christmas Basket Fund is 
an annual campaign by the club 

and its purpose is to assure that 
those whose circumstances are 
less fortunate will not be for- 
gotten. The baskets contain 
food and clothing and toys for 
the children. The recipients of 
the baskets are named by such 
public service agencies as the 
health unit, Red Cross, and by 
members themselves. 

Every effort is to be made to 
avoid duplication and to ensure 
that those needing this Christ- 
mas assistance will get it. Bas- 
kets are distributed in the dis- 
trict about Newmarket as well 
as in the town. 

Contributions may he made | Phlmister 

through any of the banks, at the 
Era and Express office, or to 
the secretary, Tom Doyle. 



Boyd, MacNaughton In Top 

Margin 

Largest Vote In Newmarket, 

School Polls 






i t * * • * 





Election Results By Polls 

FOB NEWMARKET TOWN COUNCIL 

St George's St. Andrew's St. Patrick's 



Santa 

Newmarket Saturday 
Parade Starts At 1 p.m. 

Santa Claus is coming to Newmarket on Saturday, 
Dec. 8. With him will be a grand parade of more than 
14 floats and many costumed marchers. Two bands 
will provide the music. 



THREE MEN ROB $30 
FROM CAMPBELL'S 
STORE ON TUESDAY 

A total of $30 was taken from 
the office of Elman Campbell at 
his store on Tuesday at noon. As 
police reconstruct the crime, 
three young men aged 27-30, 
went into the store during the 
noon hour. Two of them made 
purchases while the third went 
into the office and rifled the til!. 

The clerks spotted the man 
coming from the office and when 
the cash was checked, $30 was 
found missing. Two of the men 
were described as dark com- 
plexion, the third as light com- 
pexioned. 

It is believed that they were 
also in several, other stores in 
Newmarket. They were in R. C. 
Morrison's store looking at 
shirts, according to Austin 
Brammcr, then "walked across 
.the street and into Campbell's 
store. 

Newmarket police are follow- 
ing up on information they un- 
covered since the robbery. 

SANTA IN AURORA 
SATURDAY. DEC. 15 

Aurora Santa parade will take 
place on December 15, around 
I p.m., and the co-operation of 
merchants and the public is earn- 
estly solicited. 

Anyone wishing to put in a 
float will be welcomed. There 
will be candies for all kiddies, 
and Christmas trees will be 
shown on the space opposite the 

Imperial bank, where Santa will 
greet the children. 

The Aurora Citizens* band and 
the BugJe band will be in attend- 
ance. Full information can be 
obtained from Doug. Harrison, 
Harold Anderson and Burt Gil- 
bert. 



1A IB 1C 


2A 2B 2C 


3A 3B 3C 


Total 


Birrell 55 62 73 


89 86 91 


49 37 46 


588 


Bowser 51 73 M 


78 90 99 


42 37 60 


617 


Boyd 126 142 148 


130 163 136 


90 77 W 


1108 


Dales 80 91 106 


88 102 9* 


47 50 55 


709 


MacN'n 139 142 149 


120 152 104 


78 76 104 


1064 


Payuter 103 103 103 


80 124 69 


62 52 74 


770 


Rcnzius 7S 76 92 


81 107 78 


50 45 46 


647 


Scythes 34 43 46 


18 31 28 


' 16 15 23 


254 


VanZant 87 116 107 


81 140 97 


52 50 71 


801 


Wrightm'n 63 76 82 


72 85 55 


65 59 55 


612 


FOR NEWMARKET PUBLIC SCHOOL BOARD 




Best 120 118 123 


131 128 139 


65 60 78 


962 


Curtis 93 79 93 


84 108 106 


76 60 60 


759 


Ion 110 101 112 


91 111 71 


38 43 62 


745 


Phiraister 130 141 150 


110 148 110 


68 56 85 


998 



Four In North Gwill. 

Withdraw To Give 
Council Acclamation 

Although there were seven persons nominated for 
three North Gwillimbury council positions at Belhaven 
last Friday, four withdrew to make it an acclamation. 
Reeve Norman Doyle and Deputy-Reeve Lloyd Polloc(c 
were re-elected by acclamation along with the three 
1951 councillors, Cecil Prosser, William King and 
Charles W. Richardson. 



CLOTHES THIEF 

In the past week, five clothes- 
lines have been stripped of 
clothes hung out to dry in tho 
area of Eagle, Andrew and Tim- 
othy Sts., in Newmarket The 
thefts have taken place between 
live and seven p.m. 
, Police Chief Byron BurbSdge 
advises housewives to remove 
their clothes from the lines be- 
fore dark to avoid further thefts, 

TRADING rOST 

The Optimist Club of New- 
market is setting up a trading 
post, in Newmarket Children 
will be able to exchange skates 
or other athletic equipment they 
have outgrown for larger sizes. 
The Optimists request that per- 
sons turn in' skates they do not 
want, to any member of the club, 
the office of Dr. John Dales, Jack 
Hamilton or Don Warner. They 
hope to build up a stock for ex- 
change which might save young- 
sters the cost of new skates. 



K LANDING rAEADL 

The Holland Landing com- 
munity association Js staging a 

■:',.• big Santa Claus parade on Satur- 
day, Dec. 15. The parade will 
feature the Toronto CHrls' Pipe 
Band and 24 local floats. Mr. 
Walker, in costume, will lead the 
parade with his collie dog. It 

( ,- [\wm start off at 2 p.m. and treats 

j S8j&# .■■**?* for 0VB ^ 



t w 



FREE SKATING 

The fcttslMsamea of New- 
market jure makiag a Christ, 
mas present of a night's freo 
skating at the Newmarket 
arena on Tuesday. There'll 
be prixes and music and fan, 
the buiaessimen's gift to the 
public. Skating »ferts at 
$Mr Everyone is welcome 
from high school age up. 

E. G. FEDERATION 
ELECTS OFFICERS 

George Richardson of Queens- 
ville has been elected president 
of the East Gwillimbury Federa- 
tion of Agriculture. Other of- 
fi cera are: first vicc-prcs., Mrs. 
Ronald Scnnett, Queensvillo; sec- 
ond vice-pres., Walter Rate, Mt. 
Albert; sec-treas,, M. L. New- 
roth. 

At the annual meeting which 
was held In Sharon hall last 
Wednesday, Charles -Hooper, 
reeve of Markham and president 
of York County Federation of 
Agriculture, was guest speaker. 
Wm. Buchanan, secretary and 
ficldman for York County Fed- 
eration, was also present. 



ACCLAIM TRUSTEES 
Holland Landing returned its 
village trustees by acclamation 
last week. They are: Arthur 
Foster, Ken Harman and" Tom 
Haylett. 

At Sharon, M. L. Ne wroth, Joe 
Hall and Xvnn Steekley, all of 
m south ecd, were acclaimed, 
voters were present 



And as in other years, Santa 
will personally greet all his lit- 
tle friends at the town hall 
square after the parade is over. 

Santa is coming us the guest of 
Newmarket businessmen. This 
year, in departure from the reg- 
ular custom, ' the businessmen 
are bringing in a complete^par- 
adc to which will be added floats 
made up by local groups. 

It is expected that this year's 
parade will exceed all previous 
efforts in size and color. The 
coat of the parade is being borne 
by contributions from business- 
men and organizations in New- 
market. A list of the contribu- 
tors will be published next week. 

The Santa Claus parade will 
line up along Davis Dr. and the 
parade will start at one p.m. It 
will travel south on Main St. to 
Water St., west along D"Arcy 
St., and up Church St, and back 
along Timothy St. to the Market 
Square. There Santa will mount 
a special throno to greet his little 
friends and gift* will bo distrib- 
uted. 

Volunteers are needed to 
march in the parade in costume. 
They should bo between tho ages 
of 14 and 17 and are asked to 
bo at tho town hall botween 
10.30 and 12 noon to get their 
costumes. A bus service between 
tho hall and the parade start has 
been arranged for. Costumes 
will be returned after the pa- 
rade at the town hall. 

Anyone wishing to enter a 
float in the parade is urged to 
do so. Floats should follow the 
Christmas theme and can line 
up w|th tho parade at Davis Dr. 
M much before 1 p,m t# poesibte. 



There was no opposition io the 
reeve and deputy-reeve. The 
seven nominations presented for 
council were: Frank Willoughby, 
nominated by Harold Upton and 
Robert Tomlinson; Cecil Prosser 
by Frank Marritt and William 
Pugsley; Clark Martin by George 
White and Cnrl Anderson; Wil- 
liam Pugsley by Lillian Holborn 

and Clark Martin; William King 
by Fred Peel and Arthur Pollock; 
Arthur Pollock by W. A. King 
and Arlhur Dawson and Charles 
Richardson by Bruce McMillan 
and Mary Munro. 

William Pugsley was not pres- 
ent at the meeting and Township 
Clerk Irwin Winch declared his 
nomination invalid because he 
had not given satisfactory evi- 
dence that he consented to be 

nominated, a requirement of the 
municipal act Wllloughby, Mar- 
tin and Pollock withdrew to 
make it an acclamation. 

Reeve Norman Doyle revealed 
that an added assessment in the 
township, from Snake Island. 
which hod never been assessed 
before, would mean an addition- 
la! $723,000. I Iv reviewed figures 



COMING EVENTS 



Thursday, Dee. •— Bingo In Hol- 
land landing community hall. In 
aid of the Santa Claus parade fund. 
Good prizes. Special pr2les. Shore- 
the wealth. Everybody welcome. 
Time 8 p.m. 2 cards 35c. c2w48 

Thursday, De©. a_ Euchre and 
crlbha«e party .Legion hall under 
auspices of Newmarket Ladies' 
auxiliary, Canadian legion, 8 p.m. 
Prixcs, refreshments. Admission 
35c. c2w48 

Thursday, Dee. ft— Newmarket 
Handcraft group are happy to an- 
nounce tho opening of a ten room, 
handcraft shop, 1 Water St, Tea 
served dally 2.30 to 4.30. Your 
patronage requested. c2w49 

Friday, D*e- 7 — At 8 p.m., 40- 
minute color film, "God of the 
Atom"; plus music by Marlon 
Dion and Lola WriRht, vocal duets, 
Glen Lanpford, bass horn. Trin- 
ity Parish hall, Aurora Youth for 
Christ. Everyone welcome. clw49 

Friday, Dee, 7,— Bingo In Queens- 
villo school at 8 o'clock. Good 
Christmas prizes. Share the 
wealth. Jackpot |20. Admission 
2 cards 35c. Everybody welcome. 

•Iw49 

Friday, Dee, 7— Dance In Church- 
hill Community hall to Norm 
Burling and his Klngsmen orches- 
tra. Special prizes given, Time 9.43 
Modern and old tyme dancing. 
Cafeteria lunch. Admission 50c. 

c2w48 

Friday, D*c 7— Turkoy supper 
and bazaar In St. Paul's hull, Jer- 
sey, from 5.30 to 8 p.m. Admission 

11. c2w48 

Friday, Dee, 7 — Afternoon tea 
and bazaar, Legion HnU, under 
auspices Legion Ladles' auxiliary, 
Parcel post sale, fancy work, home 
baking, candy. 2 to 5 p.m..c3w47 
8aiui*tjr, Dee. ft— paper salvage, 
by the Aurora Canadian Legion 
No. 385, commendrig at 1 p.nu 

C2w48 

TuisJiy, D»c IX— The Nswrnar- 
ket Red Cross ara hoWinr » quilt- 
ing and sewing mftttof at Trinity 
Urdttd church, from 10 until 5 p. 



ro. Lunch. clw49 

Wednesday, Dee, 19— Christmas 
bingo. King Masonic Hall, 8.30 
Rhorp. 15 games 35c. Specials. 
Share-the-wealth. Jack pot $9. 
Fine prizes, for personal use or 
Christmas gifts. King Legion 
Ladles' Auxiliary. clw49 

Wednesday, Dee, IS — Newmar- 
ket Canadian X«eglon Christmas 
bingo. Jackpot $45. Share-the- 
wealth. Special games 3 for 25c. 

20 games 35c. Prizes consist of 
poultry. clw49 

Wednesday, Dee, 18— Dance In 
Laskay Hall, under the auspices of 
I*askoy Women's Institute. Weir's 
Orchestra. Admission 75c single 
ticket. $1.25 per couple. clw49 

Haturday, Dre, 15 — Come to 
Mount Albert Santa Claus parade 
at 2 o'clock. Prizes for industrial 
floats $10 and $5, school floats $10 
and 95, decorated bicycles $5 and 
92. Also 6 huge boskets of grocer- 
ies to be given away. Many other 
attractions of Interest to all. 

c2w49 

Tuesday, Dee. It—Trinity choir, 
Newmarket, present* Handel's 
Messiah, Part I, (Tho Christmas 
portion), In the church at 8.15 p.m. 
All are cordially invited. clw4D 

Monday, Dec St — New Year's 
evo frolic In Newmarket High 
School, sponsored by the Now- 
Lions Club. c2w4D 

Every Thursday night, ouchro. 
Bingo every Saturday, Time 8-30 
p.m. Under auspices Keswick 
Hi.ckey Club, U49 

Cochre ^yftty Wedaesday at 3 
p.m., In Roche's Point Memorial 
Club. Admission 35c, Every 
Thursday, at 9 p.m., dancing, ad- 
mission 50c. Every Friday, at a 
p.m., pictures, admission 25c fflO 
, Danda* avery fiatttrtfay night 
In Mount Albert hall to Norm 
Burling and fits Klngsmen 
orchsatra. Modem and ok! time 
dancinf . Jackpot and other ape* 

s^ Er^ai^ *2?*-ttn» for alt 
Admission fife. Time 9 pan, tf« 



on some of tho township expen- 
ditures over the year. Secondary 

education jumped from §9,000 to 
$21,000 last year, he said. He 
praised the work of the new 
township clerk, Irwin Winch, 
who was appointed at the begin- 
ning of last year. 

"If we had the year to go over 
again, I don't think I would 
change any of the work council 
has done in 1951," said Deputy- 
Reeve Lloyd Pollock.. He inti- 
mated that he would be running 
for reeve next year since Mr. 
Doyle had slated that 1952 would 
be his final year on council, 

Mr. Pollock said he would 
like to see a new township office 
in the future. He said that if 
there had not been one or two 
heavy expenditures during the 
past year, the township might 
have bought n building or built 
a new municipal building. 

He said that the township had 

put in an application to York 

County council for a "decent 
road from Toronto to Lake Sim- 
coo", 

• "We told the county where we 
wanted it to take over township 
roads for a better through high- 
way," he said. "I don't think 
that the lake shore road is cap- 
able of taking the traffic it does, 
especially when thero is a 30 mile 
^llmit all along the lake. We need 
a secondary road to take the 
bulk of the traffic." He said 
that the county will eventually 
take over a road, that the county 

engineer has already approved of 
the idea. 

Speaking about the complete 
re-assessment of the township, 
Mr. Pollock said that the coun- 
cil expects plenty of appeals but 
that the court of revision can 
take time to investigate them. 
This week the court of revision 
has been reviewing nearly 400 
appeals. 

Thero was little criticism aim- 
ed at council as in some past 
nomination meetings except for 
one speaker, Miss Lillian Hol- 
born who nominated William 
Pugsley as candidate. 

Miss Holborn said that council 
had dono tho beat job it could 
during" the year but it "just 
didn't see enough light". She 
severely criticized a council res- 
olution to make a beach which 
she claims is owned by the Hol- 
born estate, a public beach. 

According to the Smaliey Sur- 
vey, she said, the actual posi- 
tion of tho lake shore road should 
bo under tho surface of Lako 
Simcoo but because of constant 
shore erosion, it had been wash- 
ed away. The prosont highway 
is a trespass road on her pro- 
perty, she claims, 

"I had a fence put up on my 
beach and tho township solicitor 
aaked mo to take it down al- 
though members of council never 
apoke to me about it," she said. 
"Why should they take my fence 
down and not others." She said 
that the would not be a "test 
case" for council and that "il 
council can prove Its rights to 
that M foot roadway, ft cm have 
, (Pai* 8, CoL ?> 



Phirnister Heads 

Charles E. Boyd and Mrs. Violet Robinson MacNaught- 
on were given strong support by electors on Monday in what 
is believed to be the largest vote ever polled in Newmarket. 
The two leaders finished with a sizable margin over last 
year's councillors and their totals w<jre the first in New- 
market to reach four figures. 

* 

Boyd headed the polls with 1,108 votes and Mrs, Mac- 
Naughton took second place with 1,061. She was 263 votes 
ahead of number three councillor, Charles VanZant, who 

polled 801. . 

Two veteran councillors bowed out, Frank Bowser and 
Tom Birrell, It would have been Frank Bowser's 13th 
year on Newmarket council, 

NO DOUBTS ABOUT ELECTION 

There were no doubts about this year's election. The 
last councillor elected was Rudy Rcnzius with 647 who 
had a comfortable lead over Frank Bowser's 617* Aubrey 
Scythes polled the lowest figure, 254. 

Last year there were two votes between Frank Bowser 
and defeated candidate, Mrs. MacNaughton. In a recount 
challenge by Mrs. MacNaughton, Bowser remained ahead 
of Mrs. MacNaughton but she gained enough votes for 
a total which was greater than that of Lome Paynter, 
According to law, however, the recount was a contest 
between Bowser and MacNaughton only and Paynter re- 
mained elected. 

There were sufficient differences in total votes this 
year to definitely place candidates, elected or defeated. The 
I smallest vote gap was between defeated candidates Bowser, 
who polled 617 and Wrightman, who polled G12. 

PIIIMISTER LEADS SCHOOL POLL 

• 

George Phirnister lead the polls in the school board 
race when three were to be elected out of four candidates. 
His total was 998, Second was Mrs, M. Best with 962 and 
third, Mrs. C. A. Curtis with 759. Mrs, Curtis edged out 
Caroline E, Ion by 14 votes. 

The town vote was much larger than municipal 
officials expected. Late Monday afternoon there was a 
rush call for more ballots and a number of school board 
ballots had to bo printed before polling booths closed, 

HEAVY VOTE SLOWS RETURNS 

During the evening, returns were slow coming in from 
St, George's and St. Andrew's wards whore voting was 
heaviest. The final figures were not completed until 9.S0 
>.m. 

The first results came in from St. Patrick's ward where 
there was a comparatively low vote, Boyd, with 261 and 
MacNaughtop, with 258, were in the two top positions and 
kept their leads as more returns came into the clerk's 
office. At one point the two council leaders were tied. 

As some of St, George ward returns came in there 
was doubt about the last positions, Remius, Bowser and 
Wrightman were receiving close votes. As the final St, 
Andrew's results were posted, it was evident that Tom 
Birrell and Ed Wrightman would be out. 

The vote showed a growing Newmarket or an increased 
interest in municipal elections, or both. Boyd's lead of 
1,108 is a largo increase over last year's figure, 793, polled 
by top man, Charles VanZant. Thero was a higher vote 
for school board as well. Top man, George Phirnister, 
polled 998, compared with 821 by Allan Perks last year, 

57.456 MARK THEIR BALLOTS 

A total of 1, 916 voters marked their ballots for council 
candidates, for 57.4 percent of tho total number of voters 
in Newmarket. A total of 1,769 marked their ballots for 
school board candidates. Although the latter figure is not 
broken down, tho percentage of school board voters who 
marked their ballots is much higher than that for town 
council. 



4 



Connect Georgina Is. By Phone 

t 

Indians Pay Cost Of Installation 



Although Georgina Island Re- 
serve In Lake Simcoo la at last 
getting telephone* service, the 
improvement will bring its prob- 
lems, with 150 Huron Indians 
using the two phones, one in tho 
homo of Chief Lorenzo Big 
Canoe, tho other u pay phone 

outaido the store. Queuing 
acorns inevitable, but eventually 
many fornlUe* hope to hava 

phonei. 
Resident* of the Wand, aroiu- 

ed at the fket that the commun- 
ity h« often b«n i«l*1*d In 

the winter btc*u* of ee*4Woas 



in the channel between tho 
Island and Virginia Beach, have 
appealed many times to the De- 
partment of Indian Affair*, No 
reflponie was forthcoming, 

The Indiana themselves are 
paying the entire coat of instal- 
lation — $4,500, and alao the 
monthly tou. 

Linemen have chopped am IS* 
foot .channel in the ice to put 
down two cablet. The phones 

win provide direct commimiea- 

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MOST 

THINKING 

INSURANCE 

Our new Junior Partnership 
Policy represents the most advanced think- 
ing in Life Insurance, because it protects 
both father and son in the one policy by 

providing — 

$10,000 if you die before your son reaches 
«ge21,or 

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$10,000 if your sou dies after he reaches age 
21, or 

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$10,000 when your son reaches age '60. 




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Newmarket 



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REG. *2<W FOR $169 

$134.50 
$165. TO .$220 



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REG. $335 FOR $275 

COMBINATION 

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SELECTION OF TABLE LAMPS 

FROM $8.50 TO $20 



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$18.75 TO $26.75 

VQ$Eb "TELEVISION SETS 
BEING RECONDITIONED $89 TO $200 

RICHARDS AUTOMATIC 



$32,60 FOR $27.50 



TO PAY ON LABOUR 



Mr. Bruce Boadwin of Col- 
lingwood, district supervisor of 
the Georgian Bay District, was 
the winner of a watch for sell- 
ing the most sewing cabinets in 
Canada and the second highest 

in United States and Canada for 
his company. He is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. V/ilmer Boadwin, 
Niagara St., Newmarket. 



Farm Forum 
News 



We are pleased to print 
reports of local farm forums 
but they should be sent as | 
soon as possible to ensure 
early publication. — Editor 
Last Monday evening, Farm 
Forums discussed "Educational 
Outlets for Adults". Specific 

topics were: short courses or 
community schools; use of back- 
ground material in discussions to 
keep them from becoming mere 
"chit-chat"; and library services 
in the community. 

Ifolt Farm Forum met at the 
home of Mr. Bruce Lapp, with 
10 members present. Discussion 
leader v/as Mr. W. F. Hopkins, 
at whose home the next meeting 
v/ill be held. This forum v/ould 
welcome courses on bookkeeping, 
budgeting, veterinary skills, 
woodcraft, mending, and sewing. 
The group "has little trouble 
v/ith chit-chat/' and usually has 
a good discussion period. The 
local public library is well- 
stocked, and the majority of 
members belong, but it was felt 
that reading clubs would help 
them make better use of their 
library. 

'Kelflehy Norlh Knd forum ad- 
vocates community schools v/ith 
instruction in sewing, handi- 
crafts, mechanical skills, drama- 
tics. The secretary, Trevor Proc- 
tor, saya, "We don't have very 
much chit-chatting and when we 
do, the chairman gets the group 
back on the subject." The group 
decided to send for books from 
the Travelling Library service of 
the Public Libraries Branch, 206 
Huron Street, Toronto. I-ast 
meeting of this forum v/as at the 
home of Mr. Jack Harmon, v/ith 
15 present, and the next meeting 
will be at the home of Mr. Jack 
Macginn. 

Newmarket East, meeting at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. V/m. 
Bales, v/ith 17 present, v/ould 
like to see evening courses held 
in the high school on such sub- 
jects as farm mechanics, .soil 
management, dress-making, nu- 
trition, and horticulture. This 
forurn keeps to the subject under 

discussion by having good leader- 
ship and dividing up into smaller 
groups so that everyone may 
contribute. Library facilities are 
available without making use of 
the travelling library service. 
Next meeting v/ill be at the home 
of Mr. Ken V/hettle, Sharon. 

Pine Orchard forum met at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Rosa Arm- 
Uage, Leader v/as Stuart Starr. 
The group discussed the advis- 
ability of having short courses 
on farm management and farm 
accounting. Other points raised 
were that the probable reason 
why young people leave the farm 
was that there v/as not sufficient 
money above the cost of produc- 
tion to meet the wages paid in 
urban centres. Jt v/ould be edu- 
cational and beneficial if more 
of the neighbors availed them- 
selves of the farm forum appor- 
tunitics. Next meeting of this 
forum v/ill be at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Jock Sytema. 

V/ith reference to next week's 
subject, "Folk Schools", the sec- 
retary mentions that some years 
ago the late Arthur Uawkcs, then 
editor of the Newmarket Era, 
helped to organize a community 
folk school at Pickering College 
during Easier vocation, attended 
by young people from all parts 
of the county, including Prof. 
Alex Sims and Leonard Herman. 

On December 10, the topic will 
he "Folk Schools for Farm 
People", the final subject in tho 
current series on "Community 
Living". Let lis have your re- 
ports on this meeting as soon m 
possible, — Furm Forurn Editor 



Mount Albert News 



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Mr. and " Mrs. Bruce Ross, 
Barry and Trevor, of Lansing, 
were calling on relatives in 
town on Sunday. 

The Cheerio group of the 
United church held a very suc- 
cessful bazaar in the church 
basement on Saturday after- 
noon, and hope to have a net 
profit of $200. 

Miss B. Joan Pearson, who is 
attending business college in To- 
ronto, spent the week-end with 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hor- 
ace Pearson. 

Mrs. Siran of Toronto visited 
her daughter, Mrs. Geo. Smith, 
over the weekend. 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Degeer of 
Toronto returned home with 
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold an Satur- 
day and spent the week-end. 

Mr. Murray Case has moved 
into his new home on North St. 
t Two new homes went up 
quickly recently. Mr. Ron. V/ill- 
bee and Mr. Fred Greenough are 
building on Main St. 

Next Sunday v/ill be White 
Gift Sunday at the United 
church and church school. This 
year it is requested that gifts 
go to Korea, and clothing and 
money v/ill be sent there. Any 
other gifts v/ill go to Toronto 
city mission and all kinds of gifts 
will be acceptable. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Clarke 
and Jane, of Aurora, and Jim- 
mie Dunn of Newmarket, were 
guests on Sunday at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Burr. 

The Busy Bees met at the 
home of Mrs. Greenough on 
Thursday, Nov. 29. Jeannette 

Harrison read a short selection. 
The minutes v/ere read by Ann 
Harrison. 

Another interesting service 
has been planned for Sunday, 
Dec. 9, at Mount Albert Gospel 
church. Miss Denise Chapman 
will be guest soloist. A warm 
welcome is extended to all. 

The C.G.I.T. girls of the 
United church v/ill hold a vesper 
service on Sunday evening, Dec. 
16, at 7.30 o'clock. 

Mr. Ken. Ross v/as chairman at 
the recent nomination meeting 
and v/ill also sit in the same 



capacity on Thursday evening of 

this week at the second nomin- 
ation meeting in the I.O.O.F. 
haJl at 7.30 psn. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Ashforth, 
Mr. and Mrs. John Ross and 
children of Toronto, Mr. and 
Mrs. Austin Cook and Patsy of 
Orillia, spent Sunday at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. J. Rennie. 

Mrs. H. Ross returned to Or- 1 
iilia with Mr. and Mrs. Cook on 
Sunday to spend a few weeks, j 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Carr spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Gan- 
ton Carr at Woodville. 

Mr. Jack Graham of Willow- 
dale is having a few holidays 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. , 
Roy Graham. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lome Clement 
and family of Toronto visited at 
the home of his sister, Mrs. 
Bruce Rolling, on Sunday, also 
his mother, Mrs. Clement, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Archer and 

Bonnie of Klmvale were Sunday 

visitors v/ith Mr. and Mrs. Bev- 
erly Sinclair. 

Santa Claus is coming to Mt. 
Albert on Saturday afternoon, 
Dec. 15. He v/ill be in the par- 
ade v/ith the floats and decorat- 
ed vehicles, and will meet all his 
little friends on Main St. 

The following prizes are of- 
fered: industrial floats, 1st, $10; 
2nd, $5; school floats, 1st, $10; 
2nd, $5; decorated bicycles, 1st, 
$5; -2nd $2. 

Six huge baskets of groceries 
are to be given away and there 
will be many other attractions 
of interest to ail. 

Every effort is being made by 
the business nien and the Cham- 
ber of Commerce to make this 
an enjoyable afternoon for the 
grown-ups and kiddies. 

A hog meeting v/ill be held at 
Mount Albert town hall on Tues- 
day, Dec. 11, at 8 p.m. This 
meeting is being sponsored by 
George Hammet and Son and 
the Ralston Purina Company. 
All farmers are cordially invit- 
ed. Come and hear about hog 
production. 

A couple of carloads of Mount 
Albert members of the L.O.L. 
attended lodge at Island Grove 
on Monday evening. 






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Queensville News 



Mr. and Mrs. L. KnowJes of 
Barrie v/ere dinner guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Herb Kershaw on Wed- 
nesday. 

Mrs. I. Williams, just recently 
returned from a visit to her home 
in Scotland, renev/ed acquaint- 
ances in our community last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Watson of 
Saskatoon are visiting, Mr. Wat- 
son's brother-in-law and sister, 
Mr. and Mrs. Alleyne. 

Master Allan Day of Newmar- 
ket spont Saturday with his little 
pais, Masters Laurie and Peter 
Smith. 

We extend the sympathy of our 
community to the family of the 
late Mrs. C. Spencer whose fu- 
neral v/as held from the Strasler 
funeral chapel on Friday. 

Miss Marian Warren attended 
Miss Jean Arkinstall's birthday 
party on Saturday afternoon. 

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Morley Andrews were Mr. and 
Mrs. Auley Renoir of Hope, Miss 
Marilyn Miller of St. Catharines, 
and ?^essrs. Joe Winson and John 
Menzies of Toronto. 

Mr. Chas. Dumnnd of Toronto 
spent Sunday with his brother, 
Mr. Norman Dumond. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Jackson of 

Toronto were Sunday guests of 
Mrs. Jackson's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. VA Clark. 

Mrs. Jacob Smith and Mr. and 
Mrs. J. L. Smith spent Sunday 
v/ith Mr. and Mrs. Humid Miles 
of Islington. 

Mr. ond Mrs. Ken Davis and 
daughter of Toronto, nnd Mr. 
and Mrs. Fines and family of 
Bradford helped Mr. John Finder 
celebrate his birthday on Sunday. 



Reserve the dates of the local 
Christmas concerts. Union St. 
school is on Friday night, Dec. 14; 
Queensville United church Sun- 
day school, Monday night, Dec. 17; 
Hillside school, Tuesday night, 
Dec. 18; and Queensville school, 
Friday night, Dec. 21. Teachers 
nnd pupils ore all busy preparing 
for these annual entertainments. 

Quite a number attended the 
annual Hunt Club entertainment 
in Aurora on Friday night. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nobre Wright anil 
family of Aurora visited Mrs. P. 
Bong on Sunday. We wish n 
speedy recovery for Mrs. Boag 
who is ill at her home. 

A miscellaneous shower was 
held in Sharon hall on Tuesday 
night for Miss Doreen Bond and 
Mr. Don Mcintosh. The good 
wishes of the community are ex- 
tended to this young couple. 

The W.M.S, meeting of Zion 
United Missionary church was 
held at the home of Mrs. John 
Alleyne on Tuesday, Dec. 4. 

The Christmas meeting of the 
Evening Auxiliary will be held 
al the home of Mrs. David Weddel 
on Wednesday, Dec. 12, nt a p.m. 
The change in date is due to local 
Christmas concerts the following 
week. Tho program committee la 
Mrs. Lome Smith, Miss C. Hates, 
Mrs. W. Musselwhito and Mrs. L. 
Salmon. Lunch committee: Mrs. 
M. MncMIIInn, Mrs. A. Oliver and 
Mrs.. M. Bait. There will ho an 
exchange of gifts at this meeting. 
Each one is also asked to bring 
a sample of Christmas cake. 

Mr. Hem Kershaw has begun 
building his new home on a lot 
recently purchased from Mr. 
Leonard Wollman. 



MOUNT PISGAH 

Number* find 7 Homo ond 
School A&sneiation held thu 
monthly meeting at S, H. No, 6 
school last Friday evening. 

Mrs, Yorke, who in visual aids 
convenor for York County, apoke 
on 'improvement of the Rural 
School/ 1 pnd a film was also 
shown, 

Mr. DeWitt showed a film on 
koala bears, which all enjoyed. 
The next meeting will be held 
at 8. S. No, 7. Coma and make 
your Home and School Associa- 
tion a aucce*. 



PLBASANTVILLB 

Last Tuesday night tho churl- 
voree band v/os in use again 
when about 25 folk called on 
Mr. and Mrs, G. Hunt. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Starr 
and tv/o children left on the 
weekend to make their home at 

Alton, Out., on the farm «>f 
Carleton St. United church, To- 
ronto. 

The Bognrttown school concert 
will he held on Thursday even- 
ing, Dec. 20. 

Mrs. Esther Ifawtin spent Sat- 
urday at tho home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Art Starr, Vandorf. 

Mr. ^nd Mrs. Oscar Buckle 
and Mrs. Head of Newmarket, 
and Mr. ond Mrs. M. Sheridan 
were Sunday tea guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. C. Fisher, Birchcliff. 

Mr. ond Mrs. Allan Forbes and 
Donnu of Oshnwa wore Sunday 
guests at tho Toole homes. 

Mr. and Mrs. Orley McCluro 
and son Knrl of Port Perry had 
Sunday dinnnr at the home of 
Mrs, 0. McCluro. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm, Wnlkor 
and Patsy nnd Louiso motored 
to Worn to vlalt relatives on 
Sunday. 



PINE ORCHARD 

Rev. A, K. Dogtfott n f Union 
church delivered n very thought- 
ful messago on "Power of Love" 
on Sunday, Dee. 2 

There was a good attendance 
at church and Sunday school 
aurvltm Church service at 3.30 
p.m. each Sunday, and Sunday 
Kchool at 1.30 p.m. 

Community olub will meet at 
the ftchool on Friday night, Deo, 

7, k Everyone welcome, 



BELHAVEN 

A largo crowd attended tho 
shower Saturday ovening in tho 
hall in honor of Mr. Hoyden 
Prnsser and his bride-to-be, Miss 
Betty McQueen. 

Hctent visitors of Mr. and Mrs. 
Albert Hnlstock were Mr. and 
Mrs. Will Roho, daughter Ruth, 
and her husband, of Aurora. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Taylor nnd 
family of Ncwmarkot spent the 
weekend with hoc parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ross ^fainprize. 

Mr. and Mrs. Selhy Falrbam 
spent Sntuhdoy in Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Karle Foster, 
Vandorf, and Mr, fru Morton, 
Armitagc, visited Mr. ond Mrs. 
Don Morton on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman King 
nnd Floyd spent tho weekend 

with her sister and husband, Mr. 
and Mrs. Jack Morgan, Clare* 
mnnt. While there, Floyd took 
part in tho Santa Chum parado, 

A surprise party was hold at 
tho homo of Mr. and Mrs, Nor* 
man Kay on Friday ovonlntf, 
whon 21 members of tho Immo- 
dluto family gathorod in honor 
of Mrs, Henry Kay's (14th birth- 
day 

Mr .and Mrs. Clco. Fnlrborn 
nnd Donald called on Mr. and 
MrH. Perry Fnlrborn Sunday af- 
ternoon. 

Tho Bolhnvon Sunday Rchool 
party will bo hold nt tho porson- 
ago, Friday ovoning, Dee. 14. 

HOLLAND LANDING 

Tho United church iwrvice will 
be hild on Sunday, Dec. 9, at 7 
pjn, Rev, MftcTaviah will be 
preaching. 






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Mr. Gordon Hill, who has been 
employed at Peter Gorman Ltd. 
as salesman for the past three 
years, has been promoted to 
sales manager. 



KESWICK 

Mr. and Mrs. Byron King and 
son Wayne of Thorncliff vill- 
age visited their parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Orville King and Mr. 
and Mrs. Jas. Wright, on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bud Fisher of 
Toronto were visiting friends in 
the village on Sunday." 

Mrs. Elmer Peters came home 
from York County hospital, 
Newmarket, on Saturday. She 
is much improved, although still 
confinded to bed. 

Mr. Ronnie Council has been 
under the doctor's care for the 
past few days. 

Carpenters are at work on a 
new large apartment over the 
Davie's store. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Fair- 
barn's new home on Church St. 
is nearing completion. 

No election this year in North 
Gwillimbury, ns Reeve Doyle 
and Deputy-reeve Roy Pollock 
and all the council were return- 
ed by acclamation at nomination 
on Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bud Ffshor of 
Toronto visited Mr. and Mrs. 
Fred Peels on Sunday. 

Mr/ and Mrs. I. Waldon spent 
last v/eek in Toronto with their 
family. 

Mr. nnd Mrs. Perry Winch, Sr., 
visited friends in Palmerston 
over the weekend. 

Mr. Frank Prosscr is visiting 
his' son in Palmerston. 



Skinny men, women 



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in 5, 10,15 lbs. 

Get Ntw 'top, , Vim, Vigor 

lit a thiMI Ilony Umbi ill oui; u«t> toltowi 
Jll up* t*ck i no Mujcr Kfuwii-s: UhT/ feKtf hall- 

KUU, wofi*n. mro, * fen o«i?er ftjuM tJUn peTot*. 
aia im>v Hum! el itui*])*, hcjIlhr-tonYliif builtf*. 
'I1i<y ii.ai.k i!]6«nd>l ^.tf-bniMiuf, Oeib-r-ulJ-Uii* 
omit, (fctfef. tu tatittt, •ilmutatm-. lotikoMtor*, 
Hun, * lurch) Hi. rakluto. etrlr'i bUn". tmi-ruv « 
M'l'iHto ■di] iliitdtlom m foM ilvt* you r.i.v* 

tui'iu'tti iiMlnouriifiiMai; oui fl«n on ura boix*. 
Mn't tor k« uln* '•» f»i. mop vtlif u you've u »nu.i 




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repairs. Let us have your cril* 'by 
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Scc'y-Treas. .. 




Mixed feed oats, chopped, Irt bags, deltvored, $fri a to|§ 



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Hm Itewmmrtat Lot** True 
Btw Lodge S19 would be pleased 
to w tlco m e «ny new members or 
any mcrabent of other Loyal True 
Blue or Orange lodges that have 
moved to Newmarket district If 
you are interested, kindly contact 
Mrs. W. A- Boadwin, 15 Niagara 



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Newmarket Social News 



—Mr. and Mrs. Fred Townsend 
and Mrs. Julia McCarthy, Toron- 
to, were Sunday guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Leonard Dowling. 

—Sunday guests at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Gibson were 
Mr. and Mrs. Grant Smithy Osh- 
awa. 

— Misses Bessie and Ruby Car- 
nithers, Toronto, spent the week- 
end with their mother, Mrs. W. 
O. Carruthers. 

— Out of town guests attend- 
ing the Budd-McArthur wedding 
reception on Saturday, Dec. 1 
included Mr. and Mrs. EL R. 
L/>ng, Mr. and Mrs. Douglas R. 
I»ng, Mrs. H- F. Long and 
daughter, Charrnaine, Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Hayes and baby 



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YOUR BEST 
CHRISTMAS GIFT 

A PICTURE 



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Make Your Appointment 
Now 



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VJLEASANT SHORTING AND MEBKY CHRISTMAS TO ALL 

WALTER JOHNS AND STAFF 



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; We have the widest choice of candy ever: Moire, 
ifeot O' Gold, Miniature Chocolates, Rowiitrces, Dairy 
Box, Smiles V Chuckles, Black Mugic, to mention only 
la few. 



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SA1UDAV. DEC. 8, 7.4S PJt 

week ^ Sunshine Evangelistic Party 
Polin^ electric guitar, Spanish guitar, accordion, 






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EVERYONE WCtCOMK 



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daughter, Shirley EEen, Kenneth 
Long, Mr. and Mrs. J. C Fowley, 
F^terboro,- Mr. and Mrs. John 
Rakoczy, Mr. and Mrs. Allen 
Dolby and Ivan E. Irwin f Bronte, 
Miss Lily Flanagan, Cobalt, and 
Misses Linda and Jean Placido, 

Toronto. 

Mrs. Walter Brandreth, Au- 




rora, is a guest this week of Mrs. 
Arthur Daley. 

— Mrs. William Helmer andj 
children, Robin and Lee, New 
Liskeard, spent 'a few days last 
week in town, the guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. C. R- Near. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William Klees, 
Lansing, visited on Sunday with 
Mr. and Mrs. George Baker. 

—Mr. and Mrs. William Luciak, 
Port Credit, spent Friday visit- 
ing Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Cowal 
and family. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Morley Hunter, 

Lampton Mills, visited friends in 

town for a few days last w*eek. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Martin Forhan 
and family^ Toronto, were Sun- 
day guests of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Daly. 

— Mrs. Margaret Johnston, 
Lakeview, is spending this week 
with her son and daughter-in- 
law, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Johns- 
ton. 

— Mrs. Vera Coppins and son, 
Uxbridge, visited over the week- 
end at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Fred Case. 

— Miss Lillian Flanagan, Co- 
balt, spent the weekend with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs.. Hugh Flan- 
agan. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Down- 
ward, Toronto, visited over the 
v/eekend with Mr. and Mrs. J. 
Gordon Downward. 

— Mrs. Gordon Snoddon, Oril- 
iia, is visiting this v/eek with Mr. 
and Mrs. John Carter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dave Sherk, Tor- 
onto, v/erc weekend guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Gibson. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred Tra- 
viss and family motored to Dun- 
dalk on Sunday afternoon and 
surprised their daughter, Mrs. 
Bailey, on her birthday. Those 
present were: Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Cumber, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harold Hilton, Paul and Joy, Mr. 
and Mrs. Gordon Traviss, Ross 
and Judith, Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
bur Traviss and their uncle, Mr. 
II. J. Gimblett Mr. Traviss had 
his birthday on Monday. 



SCOTCH TOUCH AT 
ST. ANDREWS TEA 

White and purple heather 
from Scotland, tartans draped 
gracefully as a background and 
greeting from the Church of the 
Holy Trinity, St Andrew's, 
Scotland, established the proper 
setting for the St Andrew's Day 
tea. The tea and bazaar, an an- 
nual event held by the Women's 
Association of St. Andrew's 
Presbyterian church, Newmar- 
ket, drew its annual large pa- 
tronage. 

Mrs. Joseph Greer and Mrs. J. 
D. Faris welcomed the visitors 
upon their arrival. Pouring at 
the attractively decorated table 
were Mrs. Roy McDonald and 
Mrs. W. M. Cockburn. Mrs. 
Leonard Little was general con- 
vener. 

A display of petitpoint and 
needlepoint was a highlight of 
the affair. Other booths which 
received their share of attention 

included home baking, aprons 

and fancy work, house plants 

and candy. 



Ag. Rep. Takes Tour 
With Jrs. To States 



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ST. ANDREW'S W.A. 
PLANS YULE PARTY 

The Women's Association of 
St Andrew's Presbyterian 
church, Newmarket, will hold its 
annual Christmas party in the 
Sunday school room on Tuesday, 
Dec. 11, at 8 p.m. All members 
of the congregation are invited 
to the party with the men pro- 
viding the program as they did 
last year. 

Election and installation of of- 
ficers for the association will he 
conducted. Refreshments will 
be served. 



EVANGELINE AUX. 
HAS TEA, BAZAAR 

■ 

A very pleasant afternoon tea 
and bazaar was held on Nov. 23 
by the Evangeline auxiliary, W. 
M. S., Trinity United church, 
Newmarket. The finance com- 
mittee under the chairmanship 
of Mrs. W. O. Noble, convened 
the affair. 

There was a sale of home- 
made candy, home baking, 
aprons and fancy work, as well 
as a booth featuring casserole 
dishes, baked beans and mince 
meat. The small tea tables were 
centred with miniature Christ- 
mas trees and decorations on a 
Christmas theme were carried 
out by the individual booths. 

Guests were welcomed on ar- 
rival by Mrs. Earl Walton and 
Mrs. M. J.fAiken. Conveners in- 
cluded Mrs. H. A. Jackson, Mrs. 
Samuel Jefferson, Mrs. C. S. Gil- 
bert, Mrs. Morden Carter, Mrs. 
William Geer, Mrs. Ernest 
Wright, Mrs. Lou Bovair, Mrs. L. 
A. Hicks, Mrs. Frnnk Hodge, 
Mrs. Howard Cane, Mrs. Chester 

Best, Mrs. Arnold Molyneaux, 
Mrs. Gerald Wainman, Mrs. John 
Rutledge, Mrs. Harry Walker 
and Mrs. Lawrie Cane. 



Plowmen of York County have 
been awarded several trips in 
recent years but this time their 
agricultural representative was 
the one who hit the road with 
his bag when he was asked by 
the Ontario Powmcn's Assoc, to 
act as trip manager for the two 
boys in the inter-county tractor 
class at the recent international 
Plowing Match, who were win- 
ners of free trips to Chicago, 
donated by the British American 
Oil Co. They went to the Inter- 
national Livestock Exposition 
and the 4-H Club Congress. 

Elmer Erb of Perth County 
and Lare Hare of Haldimand 
County, accompanied by W. M. 
Cockburn of York County, left 

on Saturday, Nov. 24, and re- 
turned on Saturday, Dec. 1, tra- 
velling by special coach with 

the 25 Junior Farmers from vari- 
ous counties who attended the 
4-H Congress. 

Mr. Cockburn states that they 
received a very warm welcome 
from their American cousins at- 
tending the Congress and were 
royally entertained. In addi- 
tion to attending sessions of the 

Congress, tehir program includ- 
ed an extended sight-seeing trip 
of the city, as guests of the In. 



W.I. HEWS 



Belhaven branch will meet in 
the hall on Tuesday, Dec. 11. 
Motto is: "If. you have a word of 
cheer, speak it so the sad can 
hear." Roll call: Either home- 
made cookies or candy ready for 
Christmas baskets. Convener is 
Mrs. Yorke. Refreshment com- 
mittee is Mrs. B. Davidson, Mrs. 
Kydd and Mrs. O. Smith. 



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Newspapers telling for a 

penny apiece were originated in 
England in the 18W«. 



Robert Yates 

» 

Jewellers 



The BogarUown branch will 
meet at the home of Mrs. George 
Smith on Tuesday, Dec. 11, at 
2.30 p.m. The roll call is to be 
answered by a "verse from a 
Christmas carol." A Christmas 
story will be read by Mrs. Geo. 
Smith. Christmas carols. 



DONATION FROM W.I. 

Financial contributions have 
been received recently by the 
York County Hospital Women's 
auxiliary from the Gormley 
Women's Institute and the Yongc 
Street Sewing Circle. The Ket- 

tleby and Lloydtown Women's 
Institutes have sent flower vases 
for use at the hospital. 

STUART SCOTT WINS 
ATTENDANCE PRIZE 

The Stuart Scott school won 
the attendance prize for the sec- 
ond consecutive month by hav- 
ing the highest percentage of 
parents and teachers at the Nov. 
2? meeting of the Newmarket 
Home and School association. 
William Blackshaw, principal, 
received the prize for his school 
from the president, Mrs. Howard 
Morton. 

The meeting opened with the 
singing of "O Canada." Neil 
Lothian was at the piano. 'This 
was followed by the Lord's 
Prayer. Following the brief 
business session, Dr. Margaret 
Arkinstall, convener of the 
If o in e Education committee, 
gave a very interesting talk on 
"Methods of discipline, approv- 
ed and unapproved." 

At the close of Dr. Arkinstall's 
talk, the large group in attend- 
ance was divided into six small- 
er groups for discussion. Three 
questions were discussed for 
about 20 minutes when the meet- 
ing was again called together 
and the findings presented from 
the discussion groups. An ac- 
tive period of open discussion 
then followed with other ques- 
tions relating to the topic being 
aired. 

The three question considered 
In the groups were: "Should you 
give a child a bicycle for pass- 
ing his exams?" "Should you 
pay a child for home duties?" 
"What should a parent do if a 
child gives up music lessons, 
etc.?" 




TEA. HANDCRAFTS 
AT WATER ST. SHOP 

A tea room and handcraft 
shop opened today ot 1 Water 
St t Held In the Home of Mrs, 
Norman Whitfield, the sponsor- 
ing organization is the Newmar- 
ket Handcraft group. 

Mrs. Whitfield has offered her 
home so that local handcrafts 
may be brought before the pub- 
lic. Tea and light refreshments 
will be served daily from 2.30 to 
4.30 p.m. Among the crafts to 
bo exhibited wilt be weaving, 
shell work, knitting, smocking 
by member* of the group and 
silver, pawtar and wood craft* 
by Rudy Bfnxhi*. 



EE WINNERS AT OUR 

8TORE OPENING DRAW: 

1ST 
MRS. A. M, VERNON 

R. R. 3, NEWMARKET 
2ND 

MR. F. LUSTED 

13 ONTARIO ST., WEST 

3RD 

MRS. W. CREED 

40 ANDREW ST. 

4TH 
BETTY SMITH 

25 MAIN ST. 

5TH 
ELEANOR RATE 

MOUNT ALBERT 

6TH 
LORNE MILLER 

SHARON, ONT. 
7TH 

MRS. BERRY 

NEWMARKET 
8TH 

ERMA YOUNG 

U CHUHCU ST. 

ROBERT YATES 

39 MAIN ST. 

A await 4epo*U will hold 

mny mrtlete till Xmn 



A very interesting Grand- 
mothers* meeting of the Queens- 
ville branch was held at the 
home of Mrs. Albert Milne on 
Wednesday, Nov. 28. It was re- 
quested that donations of good 
cotton or rayon clothing or bed- 
ding for "Storm Relief in Ja- 
maica be loft with Mrs. Angus 
Smith. 

Mrs. A. J. Milne presented an 
excellent report of the W.I. con- 
vention held in the Royal York. 
Mrs. Milne also gave much of 
the humorous side of the conven- 
tion. 

For the December meeting 
members are asked to bring a 
friend, and each bring a box for 
the Christmas treats for York 
County Home. About 61) boxes 
will be needed. 

Mrs. Albert Milne was In 
charge of the program. The fol- 
lowing grandmothers all gave 
some contribution to the meet- 
ing: Mrs. Jacob Smith, Mrs. O. 

Pearson, Mrs. E. Stickwood, Mrs. 
Ooane, Mrs. F. Kavanngh, Mrs. 

B. AyHvard and Mrs. N. Gibney. 
Mm. J. L. Smith conducted n 
name contest, won by Mrs. Win. 
Dew. Mrs. Albert Milne was 
given a prize for the oldest 
grandmother present. 

Following ,4 The King" a deli- 
cious lunch was served. 



ternational Harvester Co. of 
Hamilton; .visits to the world fa- 
mous Adler Planetarium for a 
demonstrations of the skies of 
tomorrow; the Garfield Conserv- 
atory which has the largest col- 
lection of tropical plants under 
glass, the Museum of Science 
and Industry with its seven acres 
of exhibits including a full scale 
demonstration of coal mining. 

In addition to visiting the 
livestock show where they visit- 
ed wi£h a number of York 
County exhibitors who, inci- 
dentally, did very well, the 
plowrnei rented a car to to drive 
out to the famous Curtiss Candy 
Co. farm which maintains herds 
of practically all the common 
breeds of beef and dairy cattle. 

To conclude the week, the trio 

joined the Junior Farmer dele- 
gates on a theatre party to see 
the famous stage show "South 
Pacific 1 *, now in its 55th week 
in Chicago. 

Bob Hamilton of Schomberg, 
the York County delegate to the 
4-H Congress, was a member of 
the Junior Farmers group which 
was limited to one per county. 
These young folks will long re- 
member the complimentary ban- 
quets and even early morinng 
breakfasts, including perform- 
ances by outstanding entertain- 
ers at which they were enter- 
tained by various industrial 
companies. It was a thrill to 
sit down to one of these func- 
tions with 1800 others, including 
delegates from several of the 
countries of Europe, Central and 
South America. 

Two 4-H girls, from Hawaii 
travelled for two days and 
nights by plane to attend and 
were happy to get a maple leaf 
badge for a souvenir. Having 
had little' time to sleep, it was 
a tired but happy" crowd that 
sang their way home on Satur- 
day night. 



Newspapers consistently fight 
corruption and incompetence in 

government 



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Bently Conlkin, five and a 
half years' old son of Mr* tod 
Mrs. Fred Conklln, Newmarket, 
is ill at home. Bentley suffered. 
severe bums in an accident this 
summer 






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TROU8SKAU TKA 

A trousseau tea was held on 
Wednesday, Nov. 28, at the 
home of Mrs. Cert Budd for Joan 
Marilyn McArthur. Miss Mc- 
Arthur assisted her mother, Mrs. 
Hazel McArthur, in receiving the 
guests. 

The table was centred with 
pule yellow mums and matching 
tapers. Other bouquets in the 
house included bronze fcnd yel- 
low mums. Pouring were Mrs. 
Morden Carter and Mrs. Beatrice 
Drown. Those assisting were 
Misses Jean McArthur, Florence 
Cain and Alma Park. 



VANDORF 

Congratulations to Mr. and 
Mrs. Clayton Pogue on the ar- 
rival of their son. 

The play "Don't Darken My 
Door" was presented by the 50- 
50 club of Aurora was a great 

success. 

Mr. Robt. Corr and Mr. Ar- 
thur Starr entertained their 
Sunday schoo^ classes to a skaU 
ing party at Aurora and after- 
wards to a lovely chicken din- 
ner held in the basement of the 
church. Everyone reported n 
very enjoyable evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Slecth 
visited on Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs J. Mitchell of Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rose of Willow- 
dale were guests ot the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Aylett 
on Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. A. White and 
family, Mr. and Mrs. Grant Mor- 
ley and Rillie visited on Sun- 
day with Mr, and Mrs. Harold 
Duncan of Todmorden. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Gard- 
house of Thistletown had din- 
ner on Wednesday with the lat- 
ter's parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. 
H. Kingdom 






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woven styles. Iron Jaw tested 
for textile strength. Quality 
100x60. Regular value ap/to $4, 
$4.50, $1.95. Just say: "Give me 
six, please!" 




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Value ?9.95 to $14.95 

Sizes 7 to 10 only 

Exceptional value 

THIS WOULD MAKE A LOW PRICE 




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NOTE { Each sale Is f ihal. : ^Nf re 
exchanges. No lay-awaya; No phonf o 
This applies to all the above items. ■' . ^ 
This merchandise is priced very low for'qu^^ 

cash sales, please 



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HOPE 

Hope Sunilny school are hold- 
Ing their Christinas program at 
the HI) school house on Decem- 
ber 13, nt ft p.m. There will he 
a film shown, recitations and 
duets, 

Fourth school No. 7 will hold 
their school concert on Decem- 
ber ID, at ft p.m. 

SNOWBALL 

Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey Wood 
and family were guests of Mr, 
and Mrs. Harry Ferguson, Tot- 
tenham. 

Mrs. Wm. Gould spent the 
weekend In Toronto, guest of 
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Roden. 

A large number from here at- 
tended the Hunt ball, guests of 
the North York Hunt Club. 

Miss Hlancfte Morning of To- 
ronto spent the week-end nt the 
home of her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Howard Morning. 

Misses Susan nnd Barbie Blum 
spent the weekend visiting Mr. 
and Mrs. If. A^ Brokcnshire, 
Bnysview. 

Mrs. Mary Cunningham and 
son Jack were Sunday guests of 
her daughter and son-ln-Iaw, Mr. 
and Mrs. Lorno Graham. 

Little Karen Parren celebrated 

her ninth birthday last weak by 
entertaining a number ot girl 
friends at a party. 



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HOUSE FOR SAlf 



1 , 



- ' - 



-Modern 7-roozn brick 
house in Queensville, all conven- 
iences, good cellar, new insulated 
garage. Apply W. A. HaO, Queens- 
viUe, phone 1904. U45 



•-■ 



* ' 



.r 



■ 



— $2,000 down. You 
may own a new 4 room clapboard 
bungalow, fully insulated, heavy 
wiring, modern kitchen, loads of 
cvpboa/ds, hardwood floors, 3- 
piece bath and shower, nicely dec- 
orated in the best of oil paint, full 
size basement Apply to 4 Cres- 
cent Drive, Newmarket- *r2w49 



4A REAL ESTATE WANTB) 



ACCOMMODATION 



A rood kerne te active lady for 
the winter as companion help to 
another lady who is staying alone- 
Good home for right party. Ap- 
ply Box 61, Era and Express. 

cl\v49 



7 ARTICLES FOR SALE 






« - 



. 



NEWMARKET AND DISTRICT 



■ 



*: i 



. 






JOSEPH QUINN 
BROKER 

61 QUEEN ST. E.. NEWMARKET 
PHONE 1038 



■ 



tI31 



■••;. ; 



- - 



4 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 



■ 



i -t 



. 



-Parcel of land front- 
ing on road, approximately 1440 
ft. by 200 ft, suitable for summer 
or permanent homes. In a dis- 
trict that is building up fast. Good 
investment for contractor. J. B. 

Donaldson, Holland Landing. 

•3w48 



m venenan winds, «lu- 

Cnmnin or steel, made for all styles 
rf wtnaowa. Free estimates and 
installations. Phone 755. apply 
10 Ontario St, W-, or write P.O 
box 496, Newmarket tHO 

Ei*r Savings On 
Cendrinstien Kadios 
Westinghouse, Stromberg Carl- 
son, Marconi. Save up to 565 on 
floor model demonstrators at 
SpUIette's Appliances, Main St., 
Newmarket Phone 139. crlw4 9 

For *aJe— Lady's Coon coat, in 

good condition, size 14-16. Phone 

1059, Newmarket or write box 577. 

C2w48 



For ^ate—Oak dining room suite, 
table, buffet. 3 chairs, suitable for 
cottnpe. $15. complete. Phone 
27I\v3, Newmarket clMfi W 

For *a!c— Boy's cub outfit, pants 
worn twice. Colt, sweater, hat 
and 2 kerchiefs. Phone 611 j. New. 
market. clvr49 



For sale— Men's super Hickory 
skis 7 ft in excellent condition. 
Phone 123. Newmarket. clw-19 



For salr — Antique high back 
rocking chair, heavily caned. Up- 
holstering good. Phone King 24ro. 

Clw43 



For sale-Man's complete hock- 

ev outfit. Phone 512r, Newmar- 
ket 



*lw43 



Cfeoote your Cfcristrma aift now. 

Hampers, ferneries, waste paper 
baskets, magazine racks, purser 
wallets, belts, braces, bridge .sets. 
Done by Blind Handcraft, (Herb 
Lowe), 54 Park Ave., phone 231j, 
Newnarkct c2w48 



- 



"vr 




>:•: . 



£5 



r \ 



?»i 



[*•-- 



j*' 



For *ele— Approximately 14 acres 
of property on Eagle St. in the 
town of Newmarket Phone E. 
Blizzard. 202w2, Newmarket. 

•3w40 

AUMtKY STEWART, Bcal Estate 
. Broker, Bradford, Out. 

$16,000— Garage, service Station 
and Pinch counter, large work 
thop. 6-room house on 27 high- 
way within 20 miles of Toronto. 

$6,500 — 4-room bungalow, hard- 
wood floors, kitchen cupboards, 
furnace and bath. Possession. 

S12,000— 100-acre farm, loamle 
land, 8-roomed house, hardwood 
floors, kitchen cupboards, bath and 
furnace, within one mile of high- 
way. 

Apply ryArcy Miller, 39 Gorham 
St, Newmarket, or phone 97. 

c2w49 



FARM FOR SALE 



_r_ „ h . 



acres, all workable. 
Apply B. W. Howard, RJt. 2, New- 
market, phone 164w3, Newmarket. 

c2w48 

- % ;Z?igJSijto Farm' For H*te • 

^imwhjiamamieA house, hydro, 5 
acres of good garden land, on good 
road near No. 11 highway. Terms 
If required. C. B. Thompson, Hol- 
land Landing, phone 51jl, New- 
market c3w49 



r- -.^ 



r-*^' 



B5tf3W 









VERY SPWJfAL 

Finest quality gabardine station 
wagon coats, warm quilted lining, 
regularly selling $35. Our price 
$25.95. while they last 

At Army Airforce Stores, Aurora. 

crlwW 



For sale — Large size wooden 
crib in excellent condition, $15. 
Phone 434w, Newmarket or apply 
Mrs. Huskisson, opposite Dicken's 
Store, Elmhurst Beach. clw49 



For sale — Large size Quebec 
heater. Good condition. Suitable 
for farm home or large room. Mrs. 
Richard Burke, 25 Joseph St, New- 
market. clw49 

For sale — Model 24 Winchester 
double barrel shotgun. 57950. Mor- 
rison's Sporting Goods department, 
phone 158, Main St., Newmarket 

Clw49 



For sale— Man's overcoat, very 
dark grey, size 38, never been 
worn. Child's racing car in good 
condition. Apply 82 Wellington 



St., E. r Aurora. 



clwi9 



HOUSE FOR RENT 



:-~. -. 



'".—> 



: 






For rent — 10-room, 2 family 
brick house, situated on con, 7, 
East Gwlllimhury. Apply Era and 
Express box 50. c3w43 

For safe or re*! — 4-room house 
and bath, conveniences. On high- 
way just south of Jersey River, 1 

mile south of Keswick, Apply 
George York, Keswick. Mw43 



. 



•* 



ROOMS FOR RB4T 



. 






... 



■ -v. 



For rrnt— l^irge furnished room. 
Children welcome* Apply 66 Gor- 
ham St, Newmarket. cHvIO 

For rent— At Kettlcby. 3 rooms, 
private entrance, hydro. Immed- 
iate possession. Write James Kef- 
fcr, 7 Seventeenth St., New Tor- 
onto, phono 4783, New Toronto. 

c3w49 

For rent — 2 furnished house- 
keeping rooms, bedroom and kit- 
chen with sink, hotwnter and 

built-in cupboards. Suitable for 2 
business people. Apply 18 Andrew 
St., or phone 1155J, Newmarket. 

clw49 



For rrnt— Large front bed-slt- 
tlng room, furnished, suitable for 
two business girls, use of refriger- 
ator. Phono H78J, Newmarket 

clw4*J 



• . . 



<. 



tO AFARTMWT FOR RENT 



For atla — Child's tricycle. In 
good condition, Werlick make. 
Phone 1154J, Newmarket. c2w48 

For sale — Cookstove fitted with 
oil burners. Apply 46 Eagle St., 
Newmarket *2w48 

For sale — Pair of b*iy*s tube 
skates, size 5, in good condition. 
Phone 611 j, Newmarket. crlw49 

RECESSED BATHTUBS $60 

Smart Martha Washington and 
Richledge stainless 3-pIcce bath- 
room sets, white $160 to 5189; 
colored $274 complete with beau- 
tiful chromed fittings. Air condi- 
tioning furnaces $295. Special of- 
fers to plumbers and builders too. 
Save many valuable dollars, buy 
with confidence and have a nicer 
home. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Extra discounts off catalogue pric- 
es If we supply everything you 
need for complete plumbing or 
heating installation. Catalogue In- 
cludes Htho photos of main fix- 
tures, prices and Installation dia- 
grams. Select style of sinks, cab- 
inets, laundry tubs, showers, 
stoves, refrigerators. Pressu re 
water systems, oil burners, septic 
and oil tanks, etc. Visit or write 
Johnson Mail Order Division, 
Streetsville Hardware, Streetsvllle, 
Ont Phone 261; evenings 51 1115. 

clw49 

FROM FACTORY TO VOIJ 

BABY CHENHXE BEDSPREADS 

$&20 EACH 

I-owest price In Canada. Beau- 
tiful first quality, completely tuf- 
ted, no sheeting showing. All col- 
ors, double or single bed sizes. 
New center patterns In flowered 
or solid designs. Send COD plus 
postage. Immediate money-hack 
guarantee. Order one, you will 
urdor more. NEW ADDRESS: 
TOWN A COUNTRY, MFG., Box 
1496, Place V>' Armas, Montreal, 
Quebec. 'Iw40 



For sale — 4 antique, walnut, 
cane seated chairs; 2 antique wal- 
nut rockers, cane seats and backs; 
2 Quebec heaters large and small; 
Quebec cookstove, cream enamel 
back; electric fireplace heater: 
child's new rocker, natural; small 
jacket heater; glassware; china; 
lamps; numerous other articles. 
Phone F. Hirst, QueensviUe 1116. 

•Iw49 



For sale — 2 tires. 670x15, low 
pressure; 2 30x3 1-2 tires, tube 
and rim, good. Phone 1116, 
QueensviUe. *lw49 



For sale— 6 ft. refrigerated coun- 
ter, separate unit, 6 cu. ft. deep 
freeze. 7-up dry type pop cooler; 
meat grinder, GO cycle; 10 lb. com- 
puting scales; Rerkel sheer; show 
ease mirror back, sliding doors, 
2x5 ft., fluorescent light fixtures. 
All In excellent condition. Call or 
write A. W. Mathews, 31 Con- 
naught Ave,, Newtonbrook, Ont 

Mv/49 



For sh\+. — Beautiful doll car- 
riage. Cost $30. New. Renson- 
nblo. Ideal Christmas gift. Phone 
1259, Newmarket. clw49 

For *aift — Piano, nice, Email, 
cheap. Apply A. Siouffer, 19 Rag- 
lan St, Newmarket Mw49 



*<* 






For rent — 3-room apartment, 
heated, hot and cold water, elec- j 
tririty supplied. Abstainers. Phone 



Crc*«* Corn Halve for sure re- 
lief. Your druggist sells Cress Cal- 
lous Salve too, relieves quickly. 
_^ clw49 

For mu>— Wall radiator suitable 
for recreation room $15. Standing 
radiator suitable for nny room $10. 
Several lengths of pipe $5. Phono 
1079], Newmarket *lw49 



ARTICLES WANTED 

Wanted to buy— 3-bumer stove, 
suitable for Essotone gas. Phone 
183, Newmarket •lw43 

Wanted— 10" hammer mill, good 
condition. 50' belt for same. Ap- 
ply Corbett, R. R. 2, Aurora, or 
phone 85r2i. clw49 



PRODUCE 

CUSTOM CANNING 

Canning factory opened on Aug- 
ust 29. We have canned tomatoes, 
peaches, plums and applesauce for 
sale. Phone Mount Albert 7516 

tf35 

For *afe — Potatoes, wholesale. 
Phone Mount Albert 7516. tf3S 

Vat sale -~ Highland vegetables 
by the bushel. Hard tnurentinn 
turnips, crispy sweet carrots, dry 
white potatoes, hard green cab- 
bage. AH at wholesale prices. AH 
free from frost. Everyone Is com- 
ing to McCnllum's, Holland Land- 
ing. c4w49 

IIo you know that North Amer- 
ica runs out of potntoes by March. 
We can still supply you with No. 
I sand potatoes, dry rookers. 
Phone T. Oosterhuis, 149)21, New- 
market *2w49 



I7 B MERCHANDISE 

TIIOR WAHIIKR A O^AWrlON 
Elecrfc 25 and 60 cycle, ^rs 
washers, repnli parts and servlre. 
Stewart Ilenre, Radio and Applian- 
ces, 113 Main St, phone 355, New- 
market tfSO 

For »ale— Hearing aid batteries 
for most popular mnkes. Stewart 
Beare, Radio and Appliance, 113 
Main St, phono 355, Newmarket. 

tf40 



!363r, Newmarket 



? * 



,: \ 

* » 



■ 



For rrat— - Self-contained apart- 
ment furnished, all facilities, con- 
tinuous hot water. A congenial 
home. Apply 8 Crescent Dr„ New* 
market •2w43 



F«f sah>-Mnn's CC.M. hlcycle. 

•Iw49, nine "e suite, 6 chairs, table and 

buffet All in excellent condition. 

Phone 1361, Newmarket *lw49 



i 



IS tOARDERS WANTED 



Want**— Boarder. Phone 8S8 
or apply 35 Queen St., W., New- 

c2w49 



market 



ROOM AND tOARD 






towns tm4 b«ard for gentleman. 
Apply 49 Prospect St., or phone 

246w, Newmarket *rlw49 



1— For aged per- 
rons or pensioners. Attractive 
rates. Apply 66 Gorham St., 
N«WmarkeC clw49 



„„rT- -™- -— -— BHpM room 
with board. Phone 707, Ncwrnar- 

,-.'.'■! ***- . »lw49 



■■' 



vi 



i * 



■. 






- * °r £ Kirts to room 
CiiM i^L^Jr* <>pUonAl ' Phone 




ROOMERS WANTED 



For fcui fl — r-nrj/e size, brown 
*«eel crib, spring and maltress, 510, 
Phone 1205w, Newmarket. »Jw49 

ror Mlfl — Northern Klectrit 
combination rndlo. In good condi- 
tion. Phone 1091w, Newmarket, 
filter 5 p.m. clw45 

For sale — Sherlock-Manning 
organ. Phone QueensviUe 1121, 

HwfA 



For Mfe-Oirl's winter coat, *lz/r 
14. Hand sewn quilt Apply 73 
Kagle St, or piione 716, Newmnr- 
ket - «lw49 

For •»!« — Medium size Quel>e< 
heater. Iron bed, no springs. Ap- 
ply 16 Charlotle St., Newmarket 
Mw49 

Sre flie famous Filter Queen 
Hapless vacuum In your own 
home. Free demonstration. Free 
nremium from now till Christmas. 
Phono 1315, or apply 60 Andrew 
St, Newmarket *3w43 



Far sale— Used vacuums, cylin- 
der and upright Home demon- 
stration. Phone 1313; Newmarket. 

•3w49 



For wile— At Insiey's, men's all* 
wool flannel dressing gowns, and 
rayon silks dressing gowns. Half 
price. Regular, $22.50, sale, $11.25. 
Reg., $1 1.50, sale, $5,75. cl w49 

♦73.5* Offer 

For your old washer regardless 
of condition. NO cash down on a 
now Be&tty washer. The Ideal 
CJirlstmas gift for mother. Spll- 
letle's Appliances, phono 139 New- 
market crlw49 

Auto Hral Covers 

The Ideal Christmas gift for Dnd 
or Brother. Order now, still not 
too lato for Christmas delivery 
Canadian Tire Corp. Assoclato 
Store, Newmarket. Phone 130. 
^ crlw4P 

Vur fcalp— At Insiey's, men's Ks- 
inond Cloth dressing gowns, $7.98. 
Roys', $5,98, small children's, 
$3.08. Cosy and worm. clw40 



■■ '■'■ . . 



.■ 



T? 



-,' . ^ rl 



.MASTER TAILORS 
AND CLEANERS 



*? 



Fttr coals on hand, frnm $140 up 

Bomber jackets, $8 up 

Roy's suits and overcontt, 

$H.05 up 

Alto 

IIKAI1Y MARK OARMENTg 

6 Timothy Stre«t W., Newnwrltcl 

criw4t> 



22 



HRF WANTED 



Wonted — Boy aged 10-17 or 
elderly man to help with chore* 
and general work on dairy farm, 
lot 24, concession 6. Apply to E, 
A. Haines, n.U, i, King, phone 
Aurora 672rl3 f *2wi8 



Classified Advertising Rates 

STRAIGHT CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

Two cents » word, minimum of 59 cents for ench odvertlsement 
Half price when odvertisement is repeated on »ucce*tfvo weeks. 
Ten percent discount If Advertisement is pold within week of pub- 
lication. 

Coming Events costs two cents * word, minimum 50 cents. 
rtalf price when repented on successive weeks. 

Sole Registers,, $1 for the first week, 5# cents for earn successive 

week- 

Csrd of Thanks, Wedding- nnd Buragement announcements, 75 
cents for each announcement less 25 cents If paid within week of 
publication. 

In Mentoriams, 75 cents for each Insertion pins 5 cents a Uno 

for verse, !e« 25 cents if paid withta week of publication. 

Classified advertising may be phoned Into, or left at The Era 
and Express office on Main Sfc, Newmarket, phone 7W; at White- 
law's, phone 76, in Aurora; at Mrs. I* B. Rolling, phone S, King; 
or with any correspondent- Advertisements accepted through the 
where name of sender -Jid address Is clearly Indicated. 

Your advertisement gets into over 3,30t homes In North fork. 



Wanted — Junior clerk for New- 
market District Co-op. Mate, 21 
years or over. High school edu- 
cation. Send applications In writ- 
ing. Address to Secretary, New- 
market District Co-op, Main St., 
Newmarket. clw43 

Help wanted — Chartered ac- 
countant requires a secretary with 
a knowledge of accounting pro- 
cedure. Preference will be given 
to one having matriculation. This 
position offers possibilities of 
advancement. Apply Era and Ex- 
press box 62. »lw40 

GIRL WANTED 

FOB WORK IN BUSINESS 
OFFICE 

Must be neat in appearance and 

desirous of meeting the public 

Under 25 years of age 

Apply - Manager Bel! Telephone 

Company, Newmarket. 

clwlO 



TELEPHONE 
OPERATORS 

in 
NEWMARKET 

Full pay while learning 
Regular wage increases 

No previous experience 
necessary 

VACATIONS WITH PA* 
5-DAY WEEK 

AGE 1 6 TO 25 YEARS 

Two to .three years high 
school education required 

SINGLE LOCAL RESIDENTS 

APPLY IN PERSON 
TO CHIEF OPERATOR 

THE ' 
BELL TELEPHONE CO. 
C \ nNADA 

Wewmarket, Ontario 

clw4U 



TRANSPORTATION 



Are you thinJUnjc of tiling your 
your kitchen or bathroom floor? 
If so, please call 1282, Newmarket, 
for free estimates for rubber mas- 
tic, mnrbolcum, jospe and plastic 
wall tile. R. J. Rundle & Son, 300 
Andrew St., Newmarket. c3w47 

Trained nurse available for 
private cases, excellent references. 
Phone 1203, Newmarket *3w48 

Work wanted — Young woman 
desires position as nurse maid or 
general housework in a good home. 
Experience and references. Phone [ 



29B POULTRY WAN1&0 



Wonted to buy — Live 

poultry. Any quantity. Bring 
I hem In or will call on request. 
Highest prices paid. W. S. Apple- 
ton, Onk Hldges, or phone King 

tf27 



r>yri4. 



All kinds of !!*« poultry wanted. 
Will pay above market price at 
your door. Phone 657, Newmar- 
ket. "27 



26 



STRAYED 



Strayed — On to my farm this 

fall, one heifer. Owner can have 
same by proving property. G. B. 
Thompson, Holland Landing. 

c3w43 



A pet for Chrlttm&ft? There are 
for adoption collie pups, a fox ter- 
rior, a white greyhound and cocker 
spaniel with papers; cats, kittens, 
and a stray St. Bernard collie, 
at the North York Humane Soc- 
iety shelter. Phone 866, Newmar- 
ket. c2w43 



30 



SEED FOR SALE 



For sale — Turnips for seed. .Ap- 
ply Longford Pegg, phone Mount 
Albert 2626. clw49 



Strasler & Son 

QUEENSVILLE ' 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

AMBULANCE SERVICE 

WIONES 2509 - 2502 



Roadhouse ft Host 

FUNERAL DRfCTOK 

MAIN STREET NEWMARKBT 



WHY DID JESUS CHRIST DIE 
ON CALVARY'S CROSS? 

— TO TAKE THE PUNISHMENT FOR YOUR BIN — 



; *.. -- 



S5r33, Aurora. 



clw49 



Work wanted— Reg. Nurse will 
give weekly or day care to your 
children. Also special rates for 

Christmas shopping, hourly day or 
night. Phone 1275w, Newmarkel. 

clw49 



Work wanted — Girl 18 years 
seeks position as bookkeeper or 
assistant. Also able to type. Write 
Era and Express box 60. clw49 



24A 



PERSONAL 



5 



SKINNY MEN, WOMEN! Gain 
to 35 lbs. New pep, too. Try 
famous Ostrex Tonic Tablets for 
double results; new, healthy flesh; 
new vigor*' New "get acquainted" 
size only 60a. All druggists. clw49 



27 



FARM ITEMS w 



31 MISCELLA NEOUS 

We repair all maKes of sewing 
machines. New machines SS9.50 
up. Sbiger Sewing Center. New- 
market, 138 Main St., phone 1075 

tMS 



Heifer*, dry cows, the milking 
herd - . . all do well on Ftil-O-Pep 
Fitting Ration! Try this vttnmln- 
rich ration this year for sure, 
you'll like the results! Perks Feed 
Mill Ltd., phone 6S7 Newmarket. 

clw49 

- •'A real milk produ*e*r' That's 
what Art Benge, Merlin, Ontario, 
sn^s about Ful-O-Pep 24 percent 
Dairy Ration. This year feed Ful- 
O-Pep 24 percent to balance out 
home-f»rown grain. You'll like the 
results! Perks Feed Mill Ltd., 
phono 657, Newmarket. clw-19 



Want I'd — Transportation from 
Newmarket lo Weston or closest 
point. Leaving fi'io or 7 a.m. 
Phone 1250, Newmarket. clwtfl 



MACHINERY FOR SAIE 

ItULLIKV/RR FOK SAI.K 

1017 model, size No. 7, Allls 
Chalmers, said to he In first class 
condition, MO' 1 angle blade, Know 
l ires, Diesel. Ideal for subdivis- 
ion worii, and clearing brush, 
building lots, hasemenls etc. We 
are prepared to contract for a very 
substantial amount of the pur- 
chase price, and give terms on the 
balance. Price new $21,000, sale, 
$7,050. Also size No. 14, tractor 
only. Apply Don Christian, Jack- 
son's Point. c3w49 

For wila -— International McCrtr- 
mlck \V4 tractor, In real good 
condition. Phone italph Holhorn, 
1520 QueensviUe. *2w49 



USED CARS FOR SALE 

For wtfe— 1950 Chevrolet conch, 
maroon, whitowull tires, under- 
seat heater, mileage under 13,000. 
Priced reasonable. Phone Sut- 
ton 12r4. clw40 



SPECIAL 

For aale — Oats and Buckwheat 
chop. Hulk, $C0 per ton, cash. 
Phone QueensviUe Feed Mills, 
a000, Queensvitte. c2w49 

21 LIVESTOCK FOR SALE 



For bbIo— Inissea, surgical sup 
port*, elastic hosiery for those whe 
suffer from varicose veins, ankle 
and knee trouble. Arch supports 
Lumbago belts. Best Drug Store 
phone 14, Newmarket. 

AB-Harfca) rneumanc tablets foi 
muscular, arthritic aauritie and 
sciatic pains. Price $100. Bevt 
Drug Store, phone H Newmarket 

TOE BEST BKONCinAL 
OfMTOH SYRUP 

For coughs, colds and bronchi- 
tis. A prompt and effective rem- 
edy for the relief of bronchitis 
iteht or chesty coughs and colds 
75 cents. The Best Drug Store. 
Newmarket. 

FOR SAUS OR RKNT 

Hospital beds, wheel and Invalid 
chairs. Theaker and Son, Mount 
Albert, 3503. tf40 

wrrora m throai 

noae and throat, for the dropping 
of mucous discharge, tenaation «f 
the lump In the throat and other 
disturbance* These are the earn* 
reliable pink tablet! that have been 
used for many years by adults and 
children with good results. Price 
fl.oo; $1.75; *2.50. The Beat Drut 
Store, phone 14, Newmarket 



HOW CAN YOU BE SAVED7 

1. REPENT— Luke 13:3. 

2. BELIEVE— I ; Corinthians 15:3 
and 4. 

■ 

(a) That Jesus Christ died on 
Calvary to take the punish- 
ment for your sin. 

(b) That he rose from the 
dead. 

X SIMPLY say "THANK YOU" 
to the Lord Tor shedding His 
precious BLOOD on Calvary to 
take the punishment for your 

. sin. 

Matthew 26:28; 1 John 1:7-10. 

4. Confess Christ before men. 
Matt. 10:32 and 33. 
Romans 10:9 and 10. 



HOW DO YOU KNOW YOU 

; 

ARE SAVED? 

John iVR. 

"But as many as received Him 
to them gave He power to be- 
come the sons of God, even 
to them that believe on His 



name. 



-..--. . 



■ - ■ 



- ^ 



• ' ' , 



YOUR PART ;±? 



V 



^ ^t"°soever!$ 

BELIEVETH IN HIM" ] ~$J& 



* ™ * * ■'**^p ^ - 



GOD'S WORD,— "SHALL NOT 






^V 



*}**=- 



rS^ 5 






PERISH but ha^everlastlngc 
life." John 3:16. 

NOTE: There is only one 

Into heaven — through the shed 

blood of Jesus Christ-^ ^f^. 

Matt. 26:28. • v ^ 

There is no other WAY— 
John 14:6. . 



Inserted by a teacher of the Gospel 




fey i? m 



for sale— Guernseys, cows and 
heifers, due lo calf In nexl 3 
months. Registered nnd grades. 
Phone 1190W, Newmarket, c3vv47 



For nalfl — Pure Suffolk rams. 
Sow, 10 pigs, 3 weeks old: 3 Tnnv 
worth hogs, I months oh). C. II. 
lllokson, mile cast of Auroui. 

•rlw-10 



fr\ir hale — 

cow, ilue soon. 



Registered Jersey 
Phono John tJrelg, 
179 jPJ, Newmarkel. clw-IO 

For m»1«— 2-year-old Hntsloln 
h* Kim-s. vaccinafe<l and bred. If. 
Ti.-U.u.-, Keswick. clwHi 



Vor sal<4 — Good cow, due to 
freshen Dec. 15. Phone 310-1, Mt. 
Albtirl. clw-10 



28A LIVESTOCK WANTED 



For rent — Record players. $2 a 
day. Delivery and ptek-up charce 
50 cents. Hudd Studios, phone AM, 
Newmarket. . tMD 




in 



NO TIME 
TO WASTE" 



Fast-paced, interest holding 
film on atomic development 
and the A- Koto b (16 ™ n , 
ranninf time 35 minutes). 







-- -'A^:^ 



■--^ 



«t 



DR. HAROLD W. 
GRETZINSER 

* 

Oatstandinf, dynamic 
speaker and lav authority 

on our atomic development. 

- ■ 

Dr. Gretxinger received an 
unofficial Commission from 
the U.S. Wax Department 
to stir up the church people 
to the perils of atomic war- 
fare. 



... » 

> 



"t- 



u 



L-* ■' 



f * 



. * 



- *' 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7 



% 9&h 



.*.* 



■ 



Church of the Nazarene 



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N K W M A R K E T 



CIIKIHTMAS TKKK» 

Onlrr your Spruce nnd Scotch 
Pino Christ mns tree now! Free 
delivery, Chris Wood, 12 Centre 
St., Aurora, or Harvey l.llnh). 
Centre St., Aurora.) *3\V-I9 

For Kale— Christmas trees. Ap. 
ply Cliff Clitim, 10 l.ydlO St., or 
jihone 735J, Nowmarket, c3w-10 



NOTICE 



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Wanted— Horaea lor mink feed. 
Il^heat prices paid. Rex Smith, 
Jueeruvllle, phone 1913 collect. 

tMO 

Wanted to buy - Hoi^ej for 
mink. Will call for with truck. 
Cood cath prices paid. Frank 
Coleman, phone 1089.!, Newmar- 
ket, or write P.O. box 25. tMO 



A puhllo hearing under the 
Milk Control Act will bo held In 
Itoom .1505, Knst Iiloek, Parliament 
Huimine% Toronto, on Tuesday, 
Dec. nth, 1051, at 10.00 a.m. Thli 
public hearing is for the purpose 
of providing all Interested parties 
an opportunity of making repre- 
sentations to the Milk Control 
Hoard of Ontario before this 
Hoard prescribes the maximum 
prices at which milk mav bo sold 
In the market of Mount Albert. 

A. P. Clark, Seeretnrv. 

ctwto 



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Attend One of These 

CHURCHES 






SVNDAY, DEC. 9 



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CllimCII OF THK NA/AKKNK 

Minister, Rev. A. K. Petersen 

Organist, Miss June Haines 

PiniUst, Miss Norine Greenwood 

Choir (Junior), Mrs, A. E. 
Petersen 
Sunday School— 10 am. 
Devotional Service — II a.m. 
Evangelistic Service— 7 p.m. 
Prayer meeting (Wed.)— 8 p.m. 

Friday, Dee. 7— Dr. Grettiner nt 
8 p.m. 



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"Church going families aro bop- 
Pier". 



THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE 

Millard Ave. 

Pastor, REV. A. R. VIEWING 

Pianist, MISS VIOLET CURTIS 

D.45— Sunday school 

11 a.m. — Morning worship 

? p.m. Evening service 

Tues., 8 p.m.— Prayer meeting , 

Thurs., 2.30— Women'a meeting > 

Pri,, 7 p.m.— Crusaders 5jm 

All welcome r^felfel 






fWENDS' MEETING 






Botaford Street *&B@ 

M5 a.m.— Sunday-school ; -^ 

U a.m,— Meeting for Worahip 



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For wile— iai4 I>od«o, fl00 or 
liest offer. Apnly W. Vailanro, 
Vincent and Amelia Sts., New- 
market, Saturday. clw4'J 

For aala — 1049 Austin sedan, 
outstanding condition. 10,000 orlg- 
innl mileage. Radio and heater. 
Will finance. Phono 1200 New- 
market. erlw49 



USED TRUCKS 



Wanted to buy— 1 Holsteln heif- 
ers. I year old.- Write box 10 Kes- 
wick, or phone Roche's Point 141 J. 

•3w43 



29 POULTRY FOU SAIE 



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ORDER NOW 

QUALITY T1 RHrVH 

At moderate prlcea. We deliver. 

Mervyn fltimmorfeldt, phono 

211J22, Newmarket, c6\v45 

I TURKEYS 

For sale— Chnlee young turkeys, 
well finished. Apply Ben Cox. Il.R. 
l t Sharon. ♦.iw48 



10W COST HIARING 



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• tocriesfer w <&? uruq wcemm 

l*tiane 14 Newmarket 

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McCaffreys 



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owers 



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FOU EVERY OCCASION 
Newt 




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For «*!« 



Wilson truck body. 4 

ft. solid slake racks, approximately 
1^x7 1.2*. Phone JlftnJ, Nowmar- 
ket, •iwiO 



U WOKKWAHTIO 
vrnoumuaNQ 

Chesterfield suites, occasionat 
chairs, rebuilt, recovered In any 
fabric Apply Kan Sargent, « 
Gorham St., or poena 38J, Naw- 
markeV U« 



Far Mla—45 Barred-rock pullets, 
raying, *? months old. Write box 
10, Keswick, or phono 141J, Roche's 
Point. *2 w48 

F«r ijw>~Try SeJby'a turkeys 
for chriatmas. They are young 
nnd tender. Apply U Seiby, 

rif.!? ' or P"°no Newmarket 
*70#. c3w49 



m World 



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Foe ssda-* -live or dressed tur- 
keys, beautiful Wrda and In ex- 
cellent shape. Phone 409/ Mount 
Albert. c3w40 



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573J 

NEWMARKET 



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FREE METnODlST CHUBCH 

HBV. E. S. BULL, Pastor 

10 a.m.— Sunday School 

11 a.m. — Morning worship 

with Ladies Duct * 

7 p.m.— EVANGELISTIC Rally, 
with special messages in 
song by Light and Life 
Quartet 

Tues., 8 p.m.— Prayer Meeting. 
Thurs., Dec. 13, 8 p.m. — Class 
Meeting 

SUNDAY SCHOOL CHRIST- 
MAS SERVICE 
DECKMBER 14, 7.45 p.m. 



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30 Scoble rtucka. Place 
your Chrurlmaa orders early. 
Phone 1«4, Mount Atbert •3w40 



PERRIN'S 
Flow«r Shoj^ 

MemlM>r Fieri* T*!c*rapli 
Dalrvary Asaoclatton 

Flowers wired to all parti 
of the world, 

FUNERAL FLOWERS 
a tncijwrr 

lit Mala St 

WW 



THE CHRISTIAN BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

Main Street Newmarkel 

Minister, Rev. Fred Breckon 
Organist, Mrs. J. E. Cane 

11 a.m.— Morning worship 

Subject; "Magnificent 
Missions" 

2.30 p.m.— Sunday School 
7 p.m.— Gospel service 

"Conversion Is not necessary' 1 
Wed. 8 p.m.— Prayer and Fellow- 
ship mooting 
Frl., 2.30 p.m.— Baptist World's 

Day of Prayer 

All Welcome 
Yoar abeenee la always ewr 



Douglas Ropp 

7 p.m.— Youth Rally with film 
and carol singing from illus- 
trated slides at 8.30 p.m. 
Come and meet with us 
All welcome 

Thursday, p.m.— Monthly 
Meeting 

"Come and worship Christ, the 
new-born King" 

TRINITY UNITED CHURCH 

Rev, M. J. Aiken, Minister 
N. W, Hurrle, A.R.C.T., Organlrt 
II a.m.— Morning Worship 
"Destined to be Sons" 
THE SUNDAY SCHOOL 
D.45 a.m.— The Senior School 
11 a.m. — Nursery, Beginners and 

Primary 
7 p.m.— "The Story of Nelson. 
House'*. Rev. A. C. Huston, 
missionary, Illustrated by 
beautiful colored pictures 
taken by himself 
Everyone should attend church 
during Advent 



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ST. ANDREW'S 
PREBBYratlAN CHURCH 

Herman O. Fowler 

M»a. Ba* R.M.T, Orawiae 

II a.m. — Morning worahip. 

2.30 p.m.— Sunday school 

7 p.m.— Evening aervJce 

Mr. David Hlslopp, guest 
speaker 

Friday, Dec. 14— S.S. supper and 
Christmas tree at &30 p.m. 



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SALEKGSPJ 



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Oee. eW-Auctkm sale 
at the StouffvilJe livestock Sale* 
Arena, selling- livestock our spec- 
ially. Fresh cows, springers, heif- 
ers, sheep, calves, pigs and horses. 
Pick-up and delivery can be ar- 
ranged. This is your community 
sale. Come early and bring some- 
' thing to sell. You bring it and 
we'll seil It. Sale every Saturday, 
at 1 p,m. Make this your market 
where buyers and sellers meet; 
Sellers and Atkinson, auctioneers. 

tf45 

Wednesday* Dee- 12 — Dispersal 
sale of registered and grade HoT- 
stein cattle from the accredited 
and vaccinated herd of Geo. E. 
Hlchardson at iot 19, con. 4, Whit- 
church, 1-2 mile north of Vandbrf. 
Several of these young cattle are 
suitable for export- In case of bad 

weather sole will be held Inside. 

Sale 1.30 p.m. Terms: cash". Clayton 

Pogue, clerk. A. S. Farmer, auc- 
tioneer. c2w48 




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NOTICE 



Under and by virtue of the pro- 
visions of the Warehouseman's 
Men Act, RS.O. 1937, Ch. 186, 
there will be offered for sale by Pjtw 

lie auction for charges for work and 
storage, incurred at The Windmill 
Garage, Oakridges (Jerry Fick; 
Prop.), on Saturday, Dec. 22, at 1 
pjn,, the following motor vehicle 
registered as Ontario License 1951, 
15309-C: One G.M.C. Dump Truck 
<1948 model), Ser. No. 8976304652, 
Model 9763, 3-ton capacity. 

There is presently owing to The 
"Windmill Carage (Jerry Fick, 
Prop.) for charges only the sum of 
$434.04. 

The Windmill Carage (Jerry 

Fick, Prop.) Oakridges, Ontario. 

c3w4!> 



NOTICE , 

By vilue of mechanics' lien, 
field by us for repairs and storage, 
we will sell by public auction on 
the 15lh of December, 1951, at 3 
p.m., on our premises, 68 Eagle 
St., Newmarket, a 1939 Nash 
sedan, serial no. LH52341 and lic- 
ense no. 6430V. 

Morton Brothers Limited, 
Howard J, Merlon, Sec*y. 

c3w48 



KKTHS 



' — At York County hospi- 
tal, Friday, Nov. 30, 1951, to Mr. 
and Mrs- Leslie Beazer, Oak 
Rfdges, a daughier. 

OJdfield— At York County hos- 
pital, Wednesday, Dec. 5, 1951, to 
Mr. arid Mrs. Frederick Oldfield, 
.a daughter. 

Boutet— At York County hospi- 
tal, Monday, Dec. 3, 1951, to Mr. 
and Mrs. Richard Boutet, Aurora, 

a son. 

Dic*man— At York County hos- 
pital, Tuesday, Dec. 4, 1951, to Mr. 
and Mrs. Orville Diceman, R.R. 2, 
Woodbridge, a daughter. 

GHpln— At York County hospi- 
tal, Sunday. Dec. 2, 1951. to Mr. 
and Mrs. Eiwood Gilpin, Newmar- 
ket, a son. 

fUroM— At York County hospi- 
tal, Wednesday, Dec. 5, 3951. to 
Mr. and Mrs. Harley Harold, Bal- 
lantrae, a daughter. 

Orr— At York County hospital, 
Friday, Nov. 30, 1951, to Mr. and 
Mrs- Gordon Orr, King, a daughter. 

Shier— At York County hospital, 
Sunday, Dec. 2. 1951, to Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Shier, Newmarket, 
a daughter, (still born). 

Thompson— At York Cpunty hos- 
pital, Thursday, Nov. 29, 1951, to 
Mr. and Mrs. Orville Thompson, 
Newmarket, a daughter. 

Trinder — At Grace Hospital, 
Windsor, on Sunday, Nov. 25, 1951, 
to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Trinder, 
Shirley Creed, a son, Robert Scott. 






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* Pihtt Takcttoiht Air to Visit 32 Missions 




MAGGIt MUVl RS CANADA'S PUKES 2 



DEATHS 

Young — At Toronto, on Nov. 30, 
1951, Allan Baillle Young, husband 
of Evelyn Rae WHIson, father of 
Allan Harrison, brother of Mrs. D. 
K. MacDonaJd (Helen) of Mont- 
real. Service was held November 
3. Interment Newmarket cemetery. 




SALE 



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OV RKGKTKRKD 
IfOLATEfN CATTLB 

From An Accredited and Vaccin- 

siied Herd. All Female* Br*4 mad 
B*J»ed on the Properly* ...., . 

The undersigned has receive^ 

instructions to sell by public 

auction at 

Urr 19, CON, 4, WHITCHURCH 

TOWNSHIP 

I fair mite nonh of VandorV 

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 12 

The following property belonging 

to 

— 

GEO. E. RICHARDSON 



32064 C Sylvia Ormsby Gay, bred 

Juno 8, 1951 I 

603548 Cay Marccna Phillppa 

Posch, bred May 21, 1951 . 
002173 Hngnpple I^ura Colanth>, 

bred July 17, 1951 
388123 Malda Belle, Ijred July 20, 

1951 
4184538 Sylvia Moynh. * Grmsby, 

bred July 20, 1951 
TKS6132 Patricia Ahbeke *. Posch 

*Onnsl*y, bred Sept. 20, lO:.' 
<irnrfe cow (08790), bred Mar. 20, 

1051 
Crnde cow (08792), bred June 21, 

1951 
Crnde cow (87292), bred Mor. 15, 

1951 
7flr>535 Mnida Belle Gay, bred June 

G, 1951 
817089 any Phyllis Abliekerk 2nd, 

bred May 30, 1951 
839045 Spring Sunshine Malda 

Hell Posch (open) 
830134 Spring Bud Ormsby Abbe- 

kerk, bred June 15, 1951 
836387 Mnplo Crest Tcxal Abbe* 

bred Nov. 10, 1951 
87G9A1 Maple Crest Abbekcrk Lon- 

elm, bred Nov. 15, 1951 
87(i962 Maple Crest Sylvia Hng- 
npple, (open) 
803001 Mnplo Crest Phillppa 

Porch, bred Nov, 0, 1951 
803902 Mnplo Crest flyivln Orms* 

by, bred Nov. 23, 1951 
W0543 Maple Crest Ormsby Abbe- 

kerk, bred Nov. 10, 1951 
D098I2 Maple Crest Patricia Prin- 
cess, bred Nov. 19, 1951 
W1273 Mnplo Crest Malda Belle 

(open) 
009811 Mnplo Crest Abbekcrk Vera, 

(open) 
Grade Heifer (85153), bred Nov. 

15, 1951 

Orade Heifer (85155), open 
225.105 Rogftpplo Black Admiral 
Ideal, born March IB, 1950 
Several of these young heifers 
ere suitable for export. 

In cojo of bad weather sale will 
be held inside. 



IN MEMORIAM 

* 

Bretn — Tn memory of a dear 
mother and grandmother who 
passed away Dec. 8, 1M9. 
You are not forgotten Mother, 
Nor ever will you be; 
As long as life and memory last, 
We will remember you. 

Ever remembered by Clarence, 
Alice and fqmily. 

Breeii ~ In loving memory of 
Beatrice Marlon Breen, a dear 
mother who passed away Decem- 
ber 8, 1949. 
Your memory to us Is a keepsake. 

With which we will never part; 
God has you in His keeping, 

We have you in our hearts. 

Kver remembered by Llla and 
Bill. 

Br**en— In loving memory of a 
dear mother, Beatrice Marion 
Breen, who passed away Dec. 8, 
19-19. 

Today recalls sad memories* 
Of a dear mother gone to rest, 
Happy hours we once enjoyed, 
How sweet their memory still. 
But death has left a loneliness. 
The world can never Oil. 

Ever remembered by daughter, 
H axe!, son-in-law, Joe, and grand- 
children, Marion, George and 
Diane. 

Bre*fi~In sad and loving mem- 
ory of a dear mother; Beatrice 
Marlon Breen, who passed away 
Dec. 8, 1049. 

Her thoughts- were all so lull of 
us, 
She never coutd forget, 
So now we think ihat where she is 

She must te watching yet. 
As guardian angels keep watch up 
there, 
Please God, Just let her know 
That we down hero do not forget, 

We love and miss her so. 
'TIs sweet, to remember a mother 
so dear, , 

Absent from us, yet ever so near; 
Unseen by the world she stands by 
our side 
And whispers: Dear children, 

passing cannot divide. 
Sndly missed and lovingly re- 
membered by daughter Doris and 
son-in-law Jack. 



Aiter 16 years of plodding through Northern Ontario's dense hinter 
land on snowshoes in winter, by canoe in summer, Rev. Gusiave Lara- 

proo, parish priest of Roman Catholic church at Foleyet, 190 miles north 
of Sudbury, has taken to the air. The priest will use the trim silvei 
and red Cessna aircraft, donated by Buffalo sportsmen friend*, to visit 
his far-flung missions, 32 in all, where he ministers to some 8,000 lumber- 
man, railway employees and trapper*. 



R0/M2N SilOf f >OR CANADIAH ! MUGATE 





ttoNewiMtfcet 



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assays fiaashrtft »S1S?s • 

£eS5"«-« wafts 



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Aurora Town Teams Score 
24 Goals In Tuesday Fixture 



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c<nttil Press Csnadiao 
Conadlan chief of staff for defence, General C. t'oulkcs. Inspects 
Italian air force honor tfuards upon his arrival at Rome's Clamplno air- 
nor The genera) heads a group of 14 high officials from Canada who 
wU! reprcintthe Dominion's interests In the NATO conference whlcn 
bt£an«*A Roroc on November 24th. 



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MASCO/ HMFUSED TO ACCiPT DBHAT 






It was goals galore in Tuesday 
Aurora Town League fixtures. 
The teams punched home 24. 

Paced by hat trick performan- 
ces by Harold "Plash" Stephen- 
son and Frank "Rocket" Young, 
Ditch Diggers swamped Victory 
Plyers 12-2. It was the Flyers' 
first loss and cracked a three 
game winning streak. 

Spark-plugged by three point 
men Ron "Chubby" Simmons and 
Bruce Rose Cliff, Chapman's 
Case's Aces blanketed Jim Mur- 
ray's Hotelrnen 7-3. The loss 
spilled the Hotelrnen into the 
league basement. 

In the early game, Charlie 
Sutton, Mickey Sutton, Earl 
MacDonnld, Don Watson, Hon 
Smith nud Rill 'Tiger" Mundell 
netted singletons ip. support of 
Harold Stephenson's and Frank 
Young's three-goal scoring sprees. 
Ronnie Brown in the Diggers' 
cage had his shut-out erased by 
Bill. Kingdon. Bill whipped 
home the Flyers* goose-egg crack- 
ers in tlte final five minutes, both 

were break-away efforts.- 
Bruce Rose potted three, Ron 



Simmons two, "Baldy" Summers 
and Tommic Brodie notched 
singles as the Casemen outgun- 
ned the Hotelrnen in every round. 
Bill Kirbyson laced in two and 
Chuck Southwood one to pro- 
vide the Hotel men's fire power. 




— — aUU *r*u CtoftdUa, 
First of many cancer-fighting weapon* to be made as ■ result fit 
Canadian experiments at the Chalk river atomic energy research flat* 
turn, thif nuchina was turned over to Victoria hospital, London, Ont 
Tb# machlot uau cobalt 60 as an atom i, bomb n to bombard canctr 
calls la tat mechanical arrangement ahown here. Canadian and UA 
adtatlttj wtra en hand to examint th« machine. ^ 



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DRIVER DOZES OFF, 
CLIMBS FROM WRECK 
AFTER 30 FT. ROLL 

' A young Richmond Hill man 
who is believed to have momen- 
tarily fallen asleep at the wheel 
of his car early last Saturday 
morriMg turned the ignition key 
off and climbed out of his wrecked 
vehicle after it had made some 
hazardous manoeuvres. 

Warcn A. Hail, 19, received a 
bump on his head and a bruised 
leg when his car brushed off a 
roadside tree near the Bond Lake 
curve, went into a roll for about 
30 foot and hit a second tree. 
Hall awakened when the car 
come to a stop. Police said Hall 
claimed ho remembered the 
curve of the highway... 



FOUR WITHDRAW 

(Continued from Page 1) 

that trespass road". 

Mrs. Douglas Arnold, Roche's 
Point, complained that there was 
no township plan where rate- 
payers could find out where legal 
roads were situated. 






ENGAGEMENTS 



The engagement ts announced of 
Mnrylyn Dotin Sparhaw, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. soarhaw, Toronto, 
to Mr. Ro;;er Wilfred Taylor La 
Rue, son of Mrs. Jessie La Hue 
nnd the late Mr. W. P. La Rue. 
wedding announcement later. 



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TO THE ELECTORS OF NEWMARKET 






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My sincere thanks for the 




youhm 



given me at the polls in electing me to Hie school 
board. May! 







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Vermat ouh Sal© at l.st pm. 

Clayton Pogue, Clerk 

A. S, Farmer, Auctioneer 

Phone Stouffville 67.^12 

0tw49 

mmt or thanw 

I wish to take this opportunity 
to thank the many friends and 
neighbor* who contributed flnwer«, 
cards and rnctsaRe* of sympathy In 
the loa* of my husband. • 

Mm. Naihan 1-onghnrst. 

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-^ CARO OF TIIANRM 

The Cheerio Croup of the United 
church. Mount Albert, wlih to ex* 
tend their hearty thanks to all 
who assisted in making their 
bnaaar on floturday such a success. 
They are very grateful, 

C1ARO OF THkHUH "" 

.,T o,, ri c,0ct0r * of the Munlcln. 
•Illy of Scott Townihlp: I wish to 
thank the rate-payers for tholr 
otipport In electing me as reeve for 
the coming y**r. 

Alfred Brond 



Breen — In loving memory of 

mother, Heatrleo Marion Breen, 

who passed away on Dee. 8, Jfi-19- 

Whllo you dear mother rest and 

sleep, . 1 

Though on earth you are no 
more, 
Still In memory you are with us, 
As you always wore before. 
While you are softly sleeplnif, 

And the flowers gently wave, 
What 1 would give to clasp your 

hand, 
The one we could not savo. 

Kver remembered by Son Floyd 
find daughter-in-law Lillian, son 

Ifownrd and datightor-indaw Kath* 

Icon, 



«lilphi— In loving memory of n 
dear wife and mothor, Alice Vf«* 

torln, who passed away Dec. 5, 
1!H>0. 

What would we give her hnnd to 
clasp 
Her patient face to see, 
To hear her voice, to see her 
sin Ho, 
As In the days that Uteri .to be. 
Rut soma sweet day wo'll meet 
ogain 
lloyond the toll and strife, 
And clasp each other's hand once 
more, ' 
In heaven, that hnppy llfo. 
Sndly mused by her husband 
and daughter, Minnie. 




Central Prm ctntttuit 
Lttlle ^Sport," mascot of Lieut Ed. Mnstroimrdi's ltoy.it Cmndlnn 
ncgimeni'a platoon In Korea, i% a battle-hurdcucd veteran now. The 
platoon fought its way out of a Chinese trap around an outpost position 
COO yards from the main United Notions Lines on Nov. 2. "Sport" wan 
ono of the coolest customers during tho entire eight-hour battle .which 
raged until the Canadians were almost out of ammunition. After tho 
bsUie, Pie. It. C, (Red) Butler, left, o! Sudbury, Ont., found tho pup 
sun growling defiance in the platoon's command post which earlier 
had been overrun by attacking Chinese. Ho brought him back to Mem. 
Mflitronardi, right. Pte. llutler was trapped by tho allocking Chinese 
•nd pjttycd possum in his slit trench after a Chinese soldier tnsieel a 

grenade m way. Ho wai unhurt. In tho battle flM* ^ formal Ions 

suffered heavy casualties. 



SOMETHING NtCt fOR CHRISTMAS 



CJAKD OK THAinM 
H&S, T r T k William, and fam- 



P*U«r*on— In loving memory of 
a dear husband nnd father, William 

J. Patterson, who pa»*Kl away 

Pecs inter 3, 1950. 

Though absent, ho is always near, 

Still loved, still missed and ovor 

dear. 

I#ovlnRly remembered by "wife 

and family. 

I 

Pegs— In loving memory of nur 
dear «randson, Johnny Pegg, who 
passed away Dec* 2, 1W9. 
Ere sin could blight or sorrow 
fade, 

Death came with frlondly cares 
The opening bud to heaven con- 
voyed. 

And bade It blossom there. 
Grandma, Doran and Art. 






AT HOME 

Mr. Fred Hoover, flimeoe St. 
w., Nowmarkot, will be at homo 
to friends And neighbors on We4* 
rmdmy, Dee. 12, from 2 to 4 In the 
afiemoofl and again In tht even- 




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Oistrsl rim Oi*«4ts» 

•wsU, buy sos mm of UmmT W$ a piat*sUs model tar oa disoUy at 
S WaeUsjrtoa wetor shew ao4 sag r-um Uf tbe WgHway st U mOm per 

" Mtbt-'SFaW* +'* 



s>eur wm a RUe-jr***-*** 



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IT'S A 

Woman's World 

By Caroline Ion 

A few years ago we published in the Era and Ex- 
press, favorite recipes which had been taste-tested in 
local kitchens- Among these recipes were two Christ- 
mas fruit cakes, one light and one dark. Mrs. E. A. 
Mitchell forwarded them to us with the assurances that 
for years they had pleased the palates of the many who 
had tasted them. 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Allan Budd are pictured follow- 
ing their marriage at St. John's Rectory, Newmarket. The 
bride is Joan Marilyn, daughter of Mrs. Hazel MacArthur, 
and the groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs, Bertram A. Budd, 
Newmarket Photo by Budd 



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Each year since then we re- 
ceive requests to re-print these 
recipes. Someone has misplaced 
her copy. Another tasted the 
cake during the holiday season 
last year and wishes to make it 
herself. Again, this month, when 
the time of fruit cake baking is 

at hand we have received addi- 
tional requests for the recipes. 

So here they are ... . not too 

late, we hope, for this season's 
trying. 

LIGHT FRUIT CAKE 

4 es*s, separated 

% lb. butter 

VA cups fine sugar 

VA lbs. bleached sultanas, wash- 
ed and dried 

M lb. citron peel 

J4 ib. almonds, blanched and 
slivered 



M lb. red cherries 



WE NOW CARRY A LOVELY LINE OF 

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COSTUME JEWELRY 



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THIS CHRISTMAS WITH GIFTS FROM 



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^^Sfciistnnt Arrow tics. Top off your cam* 

iVion with colorful Arrow handkerchiefs. 

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i4 lb. green cherries 

3 rings pineapple (or 1 small tin, 

Stafford's Pineapple sundae 

topping) 

2 tsp. vanilla 
¥1 cup warm water 
2 tsp, baking powder 
VA cups pastry flour 
*A tsp. salt 

Cream butter, sugar, add the 
beaten egg yolks f vanilla and 
warAi water. Sift flour once 
before measuring. Sift three 
times with salt and baking pow- 
der. Flour the fruit, add alter- 
nately with flour. Add cherries, 
pineapple and lastly add stiffly 
beaten egg whites. Bake in 9" 
square pan^ined with wax paper 
covered with tv/o or three layers 
brown paper. Rub top layer 
with shortening. Or in circular 
tube pan 4*' deep and V* diame- 
ter. If latter pan used, it is not 
necessary to linp it- Bake in 
moderately slow oven, 275', 2% 
hours. 

' ' DARK FRUIT CAKE 

VA lbs. butter , 

VA lbs. light brown sugar 
13 eggs 
VA lbs. flour 

1 tsp. salt 

% tbsp. cinnamon 
Vi tbsp. cloves > 
Vi tbsp. mace 

2 lbs, currants 

3 lbs. raisins 

Vi lb, dates <cut fine) 

1 lb. citron peel (cut fine) 

'A lb. almonds, blanched and 

slivered 
Vi cup grape juice 
¥i cup strong coffee* 

2 ounces chocolate 

Vt cup strawberry jam 

Cream butter, add brown sugar 
and cream well. Add e&js, two 
at a time and beat in at this 
time two tablespoons of flour to 
prevent curdling. Sift flour, 
spices and salt. Sprinkle fruit 
and nuts with some of the flour. 
Melt chocolate, add coffee, jam 
and grape juice with fruit and 
remainder of flour. Smooth top 

of cake and dampen with cold 
water to form a shiny glace. 
Bake in two large pans or act 
of three fruit cake pans which 
have been lined with wax paper 
covered with two or three layers 
of biown paper. Hub top layer 
of paper with shortening. Buke 
in slow oven, 250', 2% hours. 
This cake will keep well for at 
least a year if stored properly. 
Wrap in wax paper and store In 
coveicd crock. 

Poppy Campaign 
Sometime ago we had a phone 

call from Mrs. Arthur Sheridan 
in connection with the Newmar- 
ket Legion's Poppy campaign. 
Mrs. Sheridan had convened the 
sule of poppies and had left pop- 
py boxes at each of the five 
elementary schools in town. 

"I think Ibis shows u wonder- 
ful spirit of co-operation on the 
part of our teachers" Mrs. Sheri- 
dan said when she began her ac- 
count. "It isn't anything very 
exciting but I feel it deserves 
mention because it shows how 
the children with their teachers 
backed the Legion's efforts to 
make Nov, U u day to remem- 
ber." 

Mrs. Sheridan said that when 
alio visited the schools to collect 
the boxes, MIhs Ilu Haines' class, 
Alexander Muir school, was busy 
with the project. The toucher 
hud told them the story earlier 
so that the children were busily 
coloring their drawings of pop- 

pies. 

On Bio hack of each drawing, 
Out child hud written a short 
story to accompany It, Lynno 
Penrose, grade i t hnd completed 
her work and showed it to Mra. 
SborJdun. On the back of hor 
drawing she had written, "For 
the soldiers who aro in the hos* 
pltal we aro golnjj to cut these 
poppies out and hung them on 
the wall and allways rember 
about tho soldiers thnt were 
woonded In the war/ 1 

"This wan not tho exception", 
s'Ud Mrs, Bhorlduo, "but Illus- 
trative of tho fine support we 
received," 



NOTE ANNIVEX8ARY 

Mr, und Mrs, George Baker, 
17 Church St., celebrated their 
golden wedding snnivors&ry on 
Tuesday, Dec, 4, They were at 
horn* to tbtlr frltnds and rtU* 
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Aurora 
Social News 

On Sunday, Dec. 2, a number 
of the cadets visited the Long 
Branch shooting range. They 
were successful in winning the 

Dunham trophy. 

The* Alma Rebekah Lodge held 
a successful tea and bazaar on 
Saturday, December 1. 

Miss Bertha Andrews, Bramp- 
ton, spent the weekend with her 
mother, Mrs. M. Andrews. 

Miss R. Spence, Toronto, spent 
the weekend with her mother, 
Mrs. Geo. Spence. 

Miss Evelyn- Taylor, Toronto, 
spent a few days with Mrs. R. 
Hodgkinson last week. 

The election of officers of the 
Ladies' Auxiliary Branch 385 was 
held on Tuesday, Dec. 4, at 8 p.m. 
Mrs. E. Murphy, Toronto, past 
president, conducted the initia- 
tion service. A donation of $200 
was given to the parent branch 
of the Canadian Legion. Mrs. 
Murphy donated two beautiful 
vases to the branch. Mrs. Fleet, 
president of the King branch, took 
charge of the election of officers, 
and the following were elected; 

President, Mrs. E. Mugford; 1st 
vlce-pres., Mrs. George Duffleld; 
2nd vlce-pres.* Mrs. L. Bryan; rec. 
sec, Mrs. N. Bretz; corr. sec, Mrs. 
L. Watson; standard bearer, Mrs. 
N. Anderson; executive, Mrs. G. 
Seaton, Mrs. R. Ball, Mrs. J. 
Flood, Mrs. R. Hodgkinson and 
Mrs. E. Holman. Chaplain, Mrs. 
O. Heath. 



TEACHERS TRADE 
CHRISTMAS IDEAS 

• 

Reports on the fall conference 
of the.F.W.TAO. were given at 
a meeting of the women teachers 
of York* I on Tuesday* Nov. 27, 
in the Victoria Square Com- 
munity Hall. The conference 
was held during October in New- 
market. 

A donation of. $40 was made 
by the members present to the re- 
tired teachers who are on ab- 
normally smalt pensions due to 
low salaries. 

The president called for 
Christmas ideas applicable to 
the classroom. The exchange 
which followed was very enthu- 
siastic. Refreshments completed 
an interesting evening. 



SCOUT - GUIDE MOMS 
INSTALL OFFICERS 

1 

Rev. J. T. Rhodes conducted 
the installation of officers of the 
Scout-Guide Mothers' auxiliary 
on Monday, Dec. 3, when the 
group held its Christmas party 

at the Scout hall, Newmarket. 
There were 30 present. 

Following the business session 
and the installation of officers, 
Mrs. Georgas handed the meet- 
ing over to Mrs. B. L. Sinclair 
who was in charge of the pro- 
gram. First, enrols were sung 
by the members, accompanied 
by Mrs. Horace Jaqucs at the 
piano. Then, parlor games were 
enjoyed. There was an exchange 
of small gifts and delicious re- 
freshments were served by the 
social committee. 

Those installed in office for 
the coming year are: past presi- 
dent, Mrs. B. h. Sinclair; pros., 
Mrs. Bert Budd; vice-pros., Mrs. 
Victor McCutchcon; rec. ace, 
Mrs. Arleigh Armstrong; corr, 
sec, Mrs. C> K. Gnbcl; treas., 
Mrs. Herman Bcnnit/.; 

Meeting chairmen, Jan., Mrs. 
Sinclair; Feb., Mrs. Gordon 
Cook; March, Mrs. Morden Car- 
ter; April, Mrs. Fred Breckon; 
May, Mra, McCutchcon; substi- 
tute, Mr«. Georgas; committee 
chairmen, social, Mrs. Ronald 
Watt; ways and means, Mrs. H. 
Jwjues; purchasing and sewing, 
Mrs. Charles VanZant ; mem- 
bership, Mrs. Charles Wass. 



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Toronto has more workers on 
five-day week thun any other 



Cunndlan city. 



F.M. YOUNG PEOPLE 
SOCIAL GATHERING 

A social gathering was held by 
the Young People's Sor-iety of 
the Free Methodist church, New- 
market, at the parsonage on Fri- 
day, Nov. 30. Guests of honor 
were Mr. and Mrs. Clarence 
Spence. • 

About 36 friends of the couple 
gathered for an evening of 
games and contests. A presenta- 
tion was made to the honorees 
who have moved to Toronto. 
Delicious refreshments were 
served by the hostess, Mrs. E. S. 
Bull, assisted by Miss Evelyn 
Crowder, and a very pleasant 
evening was enjoyed. 

CHRISTMAS PARTY 

The Junior Ladies* Aid of the 
Christian Baptist church, New- 
market, will hold a Christmas 
party on Tuesday, Dec. 11, at 
Club 14, Millard Ave., beginning 
at 8 o'clock. Members will in- 
vite their husbands as guests to 
the party. Each lady is request- 
ed to bring dishes for her hus- 
band and herself. 



NEAR $200 RAISED 
FOR HOSPITAL AT 
BAZAAR BOOTH 

Nearly $200 was raised for the 
York County Hospital Women's 
auxiliary from its booth at the 
Community Bazaar in Novem- 
ber. Mrs. Frank Hope convened 
the project which besides being 
successful financially was the 
first appeal made to the mem- 
bers as a working group. 

The response was very en- 
thusiastic. The hand -worked 
baby jackets, bootees, bonnets, 
socks, mittens, stuffed animals, 
dolls' furniture and the blouses 
and skirts, aprons, crochet work, 
wenving, jams and jellies, help- 
ed to realize the nearly $200 
raised through this project. This 

sum gives some indication of the 
work accomplished by the Au- 
rora, Schomhorg, Mount Albeit 
and Newmarket groups as well 
as the many individuals who 
contributed to the project. 



TRINITY W.M.S. 

YULE MEETING DEC. 1 1 

The Christmas meeting of tho 

Evangeline auxiliary of tho W. 

M. S,, Trinity United church, 

Newmarket, will be held in tho 
school room on Tuesday, Dee. II, 
nt fl o'clock. There will bo a 
enrol and candlelight service, 
followed by colored slides on 
Henry VanDyko's story, "Tho 
Other Wise Man." 

Tho flnnnce committee would 
like all member* who have mlto 
boxes to bring them to this meet* 
Ing. All the ladles of the con- 
t'mrtittlon are invited to th!a 
I Ui&tinas aarvli e. 



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IXSTTVE CREAMS & GUMS 

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MIUERS Kosher DU1 Pickles &% 41c 

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King-Vaughan Back on Beam 



Aurora Bears kicked in with a crowd pi ease r 5-3 win over Eimira Polar Cubs in 
the junior group opener Friday. Bears fearsome fivesome, who provided the main bad 
news for Eimira invaders, are seen above: left to right, Bob Forhan, Don Munshaw, 
Ken "Joe" Burke, Aubrey "Pepper" Martin and Bobbs Cook. Pep scored twice, Bob 
Porhan, Don Munshaw and Bobbs Cook counted singletons, while Joe Burke came up 
with a starring role in nets. Photo by Haskett 




n With Win 



Miles and miles of mileage 
unfolded under Aurora Bears' 
.skates Friday, and consequently, 
they opened at home with a 
xousing, pleasing 5-3 win. Vic- 
tims of the Aurora gad-about 
were Eimira Polar Cubs. 

Manager Andy Closs and 
Coach Charlie Rowntree have 
let it be nosed about they're 
hatching a district hocke ma- 
chine. Friday's scoring facts 
amply bore this out. Bears' hot- 
shot Jin?, their spearhead, em- 
braced Newmarket, Aurora and 
Kettleby players. Ace potter was 
Aubrey Pepper Martin, ex-New- 
market Rocketman. Pep got 
two goals and an assist. Don. 
Munshaw, Kettleby, chucked in 
one- Handy dandy pivotman, 
Andy Closs, Aurora all the way, 
did what he ought to — supply 
passes for three pay-off shots. 

A similar cut in the swag was 
evident drown through the bal- 
ance of the scoring as Bob For- 
han and Bobbs Cook salted 
sniping efforts away- Bob For- 
fian's polish off job was a beau- 
ty to behold, a rising corner 



finder. Assistnig alms were be- 
stowed on Walt Fines, Don. 
fcgan, Keith Ceilings, Bob Han- 
na, Joey Gasko and Grant Ed- 
wards. 

Aurora led 2-1 at the end of 
one. It was the visitors* count- 
ing first as Don. Davis swished 
a screened drive by Joe Burke. 
The eBars had it up to 4-2 as 
the scoring fitted into a similar 
pattern before the scrapers came 
out to business again. The teams 
traded tallies in the finale. 

Penalty b e nc h custodians 
opened the gate gracefully to 18 
"bad boys" as Referee Bob Pet- 
ers kept his educated thumb in 
the wig-wag position Sin-bin ac- 
tivities hit the invaders harder 
than the home forces as Aurora 
cooked up two of the five with 
Eimira at a man-power disad- 
vantage. Over 600 hot-dog 
munehers attended — the kids got 
'em free as a pre-Santa gift — and 
it was the kind of hockey that'll 
bring 'em all back and their 
cousins, uncles and aunts to 
boot. 



Defenceman Bounced 

The books on the recent King- 
Kettleby donnybrook are closed. 
King-Vaughan Hockey League 
officials met last week and an- 
nounced Norm. Taylor, King 
"Maroons" defenseman, had 
been hit with a three-game sus- 
pension for his part in the extra- 
curricular work. Taylor drew 
the only match penalty of the 
game that had to be halted af- 
ter five minutes of second period 
action. « 

The game never did get going 
after the team staged their "on 
ice" donnybrook. The game 
will be replayed, if necessary, at 
the conclusion of the regular 
schedule. 



King-Vaughan hockeyists 
threw away their previous scripts 
on rough stuff, played it by the 
book, and provided the fans with 
three action crammed contests 
last week. 

Featured were Schomberg's 
second straight win, King City 
Maroons near stopping of Noble- 
ton's victory pace and Bolton 
Wanderers' first win of the cam- 
paign. Score-board soundings 
read, Schomberg 4 Kleinburg 2, 
King City 3 Nobleton 3, Bolton 
5 Kettleby 0. 

Now for details. Murray Ed- 
wards and Henry Hollingshead 
jabbed home Schomberg start-off 
tallies. It gave the Bergers a 
2-1 first round margin and they 
never looked back. Work-horse 
Bill Winters connected for the 
lone middle period goal. Jack 
Greig rifled home a third round 

marker to complete the Schom- 
berg scoring. Kleinburg coun- 
tered with tallies in the first and 
third. Bill Roe and Alex Shaw 
were the marksmen. 



Nobleton and King staggered 
through to a 3 all tie. tallies by 
Allan Dowbiggin and Charlie 
Mashinter whittled out a 2 - 1 
first period margin for King. 
Jack Woods, up and coming No- 
bleton junior, struck for the 
Nobleton countering thrust. The 
teams battled through a score- 
less middle round with King net- 
minder Tommy Hulme and his 
opposite number, Bill Hoover, 
committing grand larceny on the 
opposition forward strings. 

King's Ken Ham brushed up 
on his scoring home-work to pro- 
vide King with a 3 - 1 lead early 
in the third. Nobleton came back 
to show their best side to gain 
a tie as Stan Foster and Tom 
Dwyer hit back for Nobleton 
markers. 

Two goals by Tom Carberry 
and single tallies by Jack Gib- 
S^Jl, Ron Wilson and Bob Wallace 
enabled Bolton's cellar-dwelling 
Wanderers to shut-out Kettleby 
5-0. It wasn't as bad as the., 
score would indicate. Kettleby's 
eager-beavers had their moments 
but couldn't penetrate a strong 
checking wall laid down by Bol- 
ton. 

Al Wilson was unbeatable in 
the Bolton >trings'/to earn a star 
rating. Bolton hit a two goal 
clip in both the first and second 
As expected, an upset result periods and added the insurance 
greeted town league disciples ta n y ln the third for their first 
Monday in another rousing twin mar fc ] n the win column. 
bill. A pulverizing five-goal at- 



Motilities 
Spill Town 



On the alleys 



High scoring week in Town 
Industrial circuit. Five in 7 
circle. Jack Caradonna to 
with a 747 (220-309-218). Do 
Mount second with 745 (210-3 
227). Other top individual marks- 
men were Eddie Gibson 738, 
Pcrc. Pemberton 735, Art Deave 
731, Geo. Wait 6S2, Roy Gibson 
675, Lylc Bond 675, John Shed- 
lowick 672, Joe Mcnar 663, Bill 
Newton 650, Dave Weddcl 651, 
Floyd Pegg 650, Bert Huston 648, 
Frank Courtney 644, Ivan Gibson 
641, Ncls Shanks 631, John White 
625, Roy Keffcr 621, Frank Van- 
denBcrgh 617, Geo. Close 816, 
Chas. Tugwell 605, Barney Stuf- 
fles 604, Dave Harding 602. 
- Four sweeps recorded as Of- 
fice Specialty, Clover Kickers, 
Metal Workers and Combines 
took Dennc's, Hillsdale Dairy, 
Newmarket Dairy and Turkey 
Catchers into camp. Dixons 
surprised with 3 - 1 win over 
Hiscy's. Top flight Meteors and 
Legion divided. New loop leader 
is Office Specialty with 24 fol- 
lowed by Legion 23, Meteors 22, 
Clover Kickers 22, Metal Work- 
ers 22, Hisey's 16, Combines 16, 
Hillsdale 14, Denne 13, Turkey 
Catchers 8, Newmarket Dairy 7, 
Dixons 5. 



JB85. Jim Cullcn 660, Gord 

Inglcdew 633, 
BenningtoiTTHO, Bus Jordon 
605, Harry Thorns 603. Bothwcll 
and Tanslcy's shooters claimed 
5-2 wins over Cullcn and Ben- 
nington. League standing Both- 
well 50, Bennington 46, Cullcn 41, 
Tanslcy 31. 



Vorclone belted Machine Shop 
7 - 0. Sheet Metal beat Press 
Shop 5-2. Vorclone upswing 
created a three way tie for first 
place in Hoffman circuit, Mach- 
ine Shop, Vorclone and Press 
Shop 40 each, trailers Sheet Met- 
al 34. Top pitcher in the indi- 
vidual, marksmen was Frank 
Daniels 604, Other top scorers 
were Geo. Hill 644, Bob LeShicn 
635, Bill VanZant 631, Ivan Rud- 
dock 600, 



Hot Rods made the only sizable 
gain in the Monday Night Ladies 
League action. They slapped a 
4-0 trimming on the Jets and 
it lifted them out of last place. 
Present standing reads Coons 30, 
Wildcats 21, Four Fifties 20, Blue 
Bonnets 19, Hot Rods 16, Jets 14. 
Four Fifties spilled Blue Bon- 
nets 3-1, Wildcats and Coons 



N.H.S. Net 

Teams Win 

Last week was a big one on 
the volleyball courts. Four teams 
entered the North York Second- 
ary Schools volleyball cham- 
pionship playdowns. Teams en- 
tered were Aurora, Richmond 
Hill, Bradford and Newmarket. 
The finals were run off last 
week in Richmond Hill. 

Newmarket High School girls 
made a complete sweep coming 
home with both the junior" and 
senior championships In the 
junior playdowns Newmarket 
romped to a 48-12 win over 
Richmond Hill and had a com- 
paratively easy time eclipsing 
Aurora 51-10 to annex the 
championship. Aurora defeated 
Bradford to gain the finals. 

In senior, Newmarket ousted 
Aurora 30-12 in the opening 
round. Richmond Hill polished 
off Bradford. Newmarket ' lass- 
ies gained the crown with a 
19-15 triumph over Richmond 
Hill. 

Newmarket Juniors: Barbara 
J. Watt, Donna Bugler, Marg. 
Cullcn, Betty Jane Gould, Mari- 
lyn Lee, Elsie Mitchell, Lyla 
Clark, Barb. Lucas, Eleanor 
Clements, Frances Markham, 
Lois McCabc. 

Newmarket Seniors: Jeanne 
MacDonald, Isol>el Rogers, Jean 
Vance, Jonn Widdificld, Paul- 
ene Bovair, Joan Mitchell, Patsy 
Dunn, Glcnna Hidden, Yvonne 
Johnston, Marg. Green, Mary 
Epworth. 



tack in the final round enabled 
Office Specialty to thunder to a 
10-4 win over Vandorf. The re- 
sult was more or less expected. 
Upset came when Mount Albert 
piled in for an early 3-0 lead 
and matched production in the 
final round with Town Regents 
to earn a 5-2 win over the high 
flying Towners. 

The combination of the Spec- 
ialty win and Regents loss put 
the cabinetmakers into first 
place. 

In the early contest two four- 
point men paced the sizzling 
Specialty attack. Ken. "Motts" 
Thorns helped himself to four 
goals and Bruce Townsley rap- 
ped in three and added an assist 
for good measure. Barney Pear- 
son, Howie Ash and Bob Staley 
counted singles. 

Vandorf goal-getters were Bill 
Kingdon, Stan. Pollard, Howard 
Timbers and Clem Ellas. 

Mount Albert's lively front 
line twosome, Pete Swartzman 
and Doug. Ross, had much to 
do with their victory plans. 
Swartzman sniped for two goals, 
Doug. Ross counted a goal and 
an assist. Bruce Paisley and El- 
mer Paisley collected other 
Mountie tallies. John Maronets 
cut in on the scoring cake for 
two helper marks. 

Mounties had the Regents on 
the ropes 4-0 in the early third 

before Harold Gwyn sifted a 
shot behind Bill Mulholland. 
Bob Smith and Cliff Gunn com- 
bined for the Towners' other 
marker, Smitty making the shot. 
Though they didn't appear in the 
scoring statistics, defenseman 
Bob Dixon and net-minder Bill 
Mulhollnnd played starring roles 
for the winners. 

Office Speciolty: If. Andrews, 
R. Wilkins, G. Blight, N. Zogalo, 
B. Pearson, S. Gibbons, K. 
Thorns, I. Burke, B. Townsley, 
H. Ash, J. Staley. 

Vandorf: G. Fletcher, A. 
Lloyd, M. VnnNostrand, N. Van- 
Nostrand, W. Kingdon, J. Pres- 
ton, T. Tidman, C. Ellas, H. Tim- 
bers, S. Pollard, B. Hood, R. 

Staley. 

Mount Albert: W. Mulhollnnd, 
B. Dixon, J. Maronets, R. Draper, 
P. Swartzman, D. Couch, D. 
Ross, M. Smalley, R. Stokes, B. 
Paisley, G. Green, E. Paisley, D. 
Grose, H. Berwick. 



Town Scoring 

Sizzling races ore developing 
for the scoring championships in 
both the Newmarket and Aurora 
Town Leagues. As yet trophies 
for the top marksmen in both 
leagues haven't come through 
but they're said to be in the off- 
ing. Here are the loaders in 
group as of Nov. 30: 

NEWMARKET & DISTRICT 

GAP 

D. Coach (MA) 9 4 13 

II. Cain (TR) 5 6 11 

R, Smith (TR) 5 5 10 

C. Gunn (TR) 7 2 9 

D. Ross (MA) 7 2 9 
B. Pearson (OS) 3 5 8 
K. Thorns (OS) 4 4 8 
S. Gibbons (OS) 4 3 7 

B. Townsley (OS) 8 17 
W. Kingdon (V) 15 6 

AURORA TOWN LEAGUE 

GAP 

D. Richardson <VF) 5 18 
H. Stephenson (DD) 3 2 5 
F. Yoonff (DD) 2 3 5 

C. Ellas (VF) 3 2 5 
W. KSngdon (VF) 2 2 4 
M. Sutton (DD) 2 2 4 
A. White <QB) 3 14 

E. Rose (CA) 3 14 





Inspired by the delightful 18th Ontur> 
"lowboy", RCA Victor designers have 
struck a fresh new note in furniture 
decor* Perfectiop of form and line is delicately ac- 
cented by an "inlay-effect" round the magnificently 
grained door panels. Here's complete radio-phono 
graph entertainment in a cabinet that will add fresh 
charm to any interior. 



COME IN TODAY 



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The North York Intcrscholas- 
tic Basketball League will have 

three series this year, Junior A, 

i -, io „r;r',- r. ^ . iv i h ^n Junior B and Senior. Four teams 
shared 2 points apiece. Top three nnvc cnlercd U)e men . a d - . . 

game marks were recorded by competition Thev are Richmond 
Marion WardeH topped the hit gfatt Cline 647 Mary Austin 573. Kf^ 
marks in the Office Specialty Mimi Giovanelli 570, June Fines Pickering College. Play for the 
Thursday Night Ladies League, 567, Phyl Mclnnis 562, Claire i caRue championship and the 
With a 510 (144-158-208). Other Pollock 555, Mary Osborne 542, .right to advance into the C. O. 
top scorcrfl were Clara Stark 507 Jeanne Gatti 533, Nclta Smalley : s. S. A. Ontario playdowns will 
(181-142-184). Mary Londry 492 536, Hester Clark 520, Edna Mc- 1 opcn the second week in Jnnu- 

The Indies' division will !>c 
operated under a similar set-up 
with entries from Richmond 
Hill, Aurora and Newmarket be- 
ing accepted. League officials 
met Tuesday in Aurora to put 
their plans in *hnpe for the com- 
ing season. 

Representatives present were 
Principal J. II. Knowles, Mrs. J. 
Gerrow, Frank Grcgoire, Au- 
rora; Miss J Kelly, F. Spcer, 



Use Era and Express Classifieds 



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(209-129-154), League standing Grath 524, Nora Gibncy 524, 
Queen's 17. Dubs 10. Pin-ups 9. Pearl Codlln 502, Floss Gibson 
** • 501, Annie Stickland 500. 

Myrtle Dunn grabbed the hon- ; 

ors in the Thursday night ladies ^ iMmmm IWam IU 

league with a 558. Other top rCC-WCtJ UpCfl Up 

ranking marks were «*ta! by CflnaUa hQS |ts A||cn Cup , 

Helen Tomlinson 552, Mane Mc- Aun)ra has one %Q0 Jn Aurora 

Cabe 533, Bessie Wonch 528 K»|a [t h R A „ Trophy rcp , 
Wilkins 609, Bev. Walker 502. 



* 



Lou Bovair was the "big gun" 
in last week's Office Specialty 
Officemen'a league with a 678 
(163-S02-2U) mark- Roy Ben- 
nett cracked out a 607 (149-249- 
209) for second and Joe Vandcn- 
Bergh hit a 606 (162-290-154) 
pace for third, Standing Mac- 
Farlane's 18, Bovair** 16, Bennitz 
13, Cook's 10, Bennett and Burch 
8 each. 

Myrtle Dunn highlighted the 
Wednesday afternoon ladles 
league scoring with a 602 (279- 
148-175), second Melrose Moly- 
neaux 676 (282-163-131/, third 
Ruby Henncy 639, fourth Edna 
.'McOrath 502. League standing 
Mosqultos 25, Spitfires 16, Jets 
16, Vampires 15, 

_ 

Art Pepplatt tallied a 693 to 
pace the Davis Leather loop 
■coring last week. Pep racked 
up game* of 175-281-237 to com- 
pile his toUL Other toUU over 
600 were counted by Ken Tan*- 



rcscnting pec-wee hockey su- 
premacy. The four teams com- 
prising the Saturday morning 

pec-wee league launched their j Newmarket, L. Lanier, Picker- 
drivo to land the Allen cup in ing College; Principal A. S. E1- 



thcir ruphoard Saturday morn- 
ing. Two ties resulted from 
last Saturday morning tiffs. 

Leafs and Canadiens drew 3- 
all and in game two, Detroit and 
Chicago battled- to a scoreless 
draw. Don. Glass paced the 
Leafs scoring with two goals and 
Hugh Hammond collected one. 
Ted Murrell, Hugh Bolshy and 
Bob Davis counted one each for 
Canadiens. 

In the scoreless stalemate, 
Redwing net-minder Leroy Ellis 
and Black Hawks Billle Case, 
guardian of the rigging, came up 
with outstanding blocking jobs 
to gain shut-outs. 

League over-seer Bill Mundell 
advises "hope to get the ban- 
tam section rolling next week. 
Four teams, Spence's, Rockets, 
Arena JeU and Ernie Imps In 
that division. There'a need for 
a couple of sponsors. Anybody 
game?" 



son, W. Morrow and Wm. Ellis, 
Richmond Hill. 

CunwsKore 

Aurora and Newmarket curl- 
ers and would-be curlers are re- 
minded Bradford's plush new 
artificial ice curling club has 
openings for a few more mem- 
bers. If you haven't joined — dp 
It now. For Information con- 
tact Joe Winterkorn, phone 
404w3, Newmarket, Lou Steph- 
ens or Ken. Stiver for informa- 
tion. 



Aurora ladies, who proved 
conclusively last year that boys 
didn't have a monopoly on 
hockey, will launch another 
season next Tuesday. Aurora 
gals on that occasion will be 
host to East York ladies hockey 
team. Game time Is 7 p.m. 

Aurora line-up, reports Coach 
Ken. Rose, will be Gwen Myke, 
Edna Marinoff, Joan Marinoff, 
Rarb. Rose, Lucille Case, Gloria 
Evans, Audrey Dyment, Anne 
Skanes, Irene Mashinter, Midge 
May, Shirley Goodwin, Esther 
Topp and Retty Patrick. 

Free Fof Kids 

Boys and girls, when accom- 
panied by an adult, henceforth 
will be admitted free to all New- 
market and District Hockey 
League gomes, reports league 
president Ray Smith. Fan at- 
tendance for the Monday "blood 
and thunder" tilts has been soar- 
ing and the league is keeping 
well ahead of the bailiff. 

"It's the biggest two bits 
worth of hockey you coulcffind 
anywhere" continues president 
Smith. The league has three 
evenly balanced teams In the Of- 
fice Specialty, Town Regents 
and Mount Albert. Horry Lav- 
ender, Vandorf coach, is en- 
deavoring to strengthen his sag- 
ging basement dwellers and if 
successful there won't bo any 
euro victories from here on. 



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horses numbered 13.4S8, or one 
to every five inhabitants, Gov- 
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Canada has some 600,000 miles 
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CLOSE BOOKS TONIGHT 

The Lake 8i»eoe Softball 
League executive aad team 

representative* will asset *••, 
algfcl (Tkanday) to effWai- 
ly ekMm alMf) en Um» 1W1 aaa- 
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Spits Show Impfovement 
Lose 5-3 To Collingwood 



Spits lost number two Satur- 
day night as they invaded Col- 
lingwood.' Tliey dropped a 5-3 
decision to Eddie Bush's Colling- 
wood Shipbuilders. 

But the result was so start- 
ling — after Thursday's debacle 
here — Spits supporters are al- 
most hailing it as a win, and 
local fandom had every right 
to look on the situation more 
hopefully. 

We'll let manager Mickey 
Smith give you the manager's 
slant on it: "It wasn't the same 
team — Spits were vastly im- 
proved. They had hustle and 
light. We were without Ross 
Hockberg, Jack Andrews and 
Normie Legge. With those three 
we could have won. 

"Joe Tunney starred in goal. 
'Fink' Tunstead came up with 

his best effort of this and sev- 
eral seasons. Ken Broughton 
was a decided asset, but all our 
boys were jolly well up and at 
'em and proved they'd all taken 
on their quota of wheaties." 

Spits polled a 1-0 edge in the 
first as AI. Shewchuk re-routed 
a Don. Smith pass into the Ship- 
builders* cage. Spits hit again 
for two in the third, a Shew- 
chuk pass to Don. Gibson regis- 
tered and a three way relay 
from Bill McGhee to Ortic 
Thorns to Grant Firth clicked. 
Betwixt the Spits scoring, Ship- 
builders got in their kill shots 
on two goals by Len. Cook and 
singles sniped by Frank Gowing 
and Robbie Sandell. 

LOSE 9 - 4 

Newmarket Spits were seared 
9-4 by Collingwood here Thurs- 
day The occasion was the Big 
Five Senior group opener. Their 
loss downcast some 1,100 fans. 
The visitors' overall advantage 
more or less added up to the 
total that Collingwood are the 
team to beat if the Spits ore 
to go far down the O.H.A. trail. 

Scoring statistics: Collingwood 
hit a three goal a period clip. 
Spits were in for one in the 
first, improved for two in the 
second, and completed with a 
last period tal.y. "Fink" Tun- 
stead re-routed an Eddie Bush 
intended clearing effort into the 
Collingowod cage for our first. 

A goal mouth wild stick 
swinging exchange enabled Bill 
Patrick to pot number two. 
Swifty Todd assisted. Bill Johns- 
ton struck when Collingwood 
was a man short for the third, 
assisted by Don. Smith. 

Smitty came bock for the 
fourth— 20 seconds remaining in 
the game— as he caught the Col- 
lingwood rear-guard napping os 
they started to* celebrate too 
soorK Bill Johnston gained on 

Eddie Bush mode sure his 
charges got av/ay on the right 
foot with a goal at 2.30 to crack 
open the scoring. The Bushman 
didn't score again but racked up 
three assists. Frank Gowing was 
their only two-goal man. 

Collingwood had polish inside 
Spits zone. They threw the 
puck around more freely than 
Shewchuk's band. On the other 
hand, a good many of Spits' 
rushes broke on the rocks of the 
Collingwood defense. Score did- 
n't rightly indicate the division 
of play. Spits had a s many if 

HOW THEY STAND 



not more shots on the Colling* 
wood cage. 

Penalty box statistics: It was- 
n't a heavily charged penalty 
game— there were 11. It was no 
tea party— rugged would de- 
scribe it. At times the puck ap- 
peared a non-essential acces- 
sory. Biggest blow-off came 
early in the third as Ref. Red 
Farrell chased Eddie Bush and 
Normie Legge for five each for 
fighting. The do even brought 
a few railside fans into the 
melee. 



Sptts Clipped 

We're as happy as the next 
one to see a team start cam- 
paigning with a win before the 
home folks but at the expense 
of our Spits — vote is no. Spits 

were visitors to Stouffville to 
see the Clippers get their Big 
Five season mobile Tuesday. 
The Clippers did get mobile and 
clipped our Spits 7-2. That loss 
ran the Spits string to three and 
haven hereabouts. However it'll 



HASHMAN AWARD 

"Up And At 'Em Boy" 

Up and at 'em spirit puts plenty of marks In the 
win column for any hockey club, Aurpra had that 
spirit and plenty of gallop under their skates Friday 
night as they broke the junior O.H.A. hockey campaign 
open. 

It was a winning performance, of course. Most 
"up and at 'em" guy in our books was Aubrey Pepper 
Martin. Pep needs no introduction to the fans here- 
abouts. He came up through our minor hockey ranks 
and was a junior Rocketman last season. He was 
a rocketman in every sense of the word Friday, He 
connected for two goals and an assist to pace the Bears 

scoring statistics. 

That's why we're nominating Pepper Martin for 
the Ilashmnn award and Roxy Theatre pass this week. 



* 



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Eddie Bush, local fans' choice "to get lost", came 
In with a bottle Thursday. "This" gays Eddie boy 
"Is the stuff that will put your Spitfires to sleep. 



.1 
" I 



be different tonight, as the Spits 

entertain Midland here, 

Swifty Todd and Don. Smith 

accumulated the Spits' scoring 
points in Tuesday's battle. 
Harold Gibson with two, Hud 
Watson. • Polly Minton, Jack 
Rumtiey, George Stark and Nick 
Bangay with singles, were the 
Clippers goal-getters. 



Mora Sports 

on pages 5 & 7 



OH, WHAT A LOVELY WAR ! (TO GET AWAY FROM !) 




— CtnttM Frtit CftatdUa. 

These smiling faces belong to riflemen of the 2nd n C-54 transport aircraft. They are returning to 
fiattalfon Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Canada ou rotation after many months of combat In 
they lake a last look at Korea from the door of the battle areas of tho Korean peninsula. 



DOWN THE CENTRE by ab hulse 



KING-VAIJtillAN 



Nobleton 
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Don't Write Off Spits Too Soon 



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VMMUAV , HATI/RIIAV 

HI)o/nlo Fk'iHlntf, JoJiij I»oy»)« 
SKCONJ) ffrJATUJlB 

f« Color 

Irtjier *." 

Hoy Itogiw, Pule Kvonn 

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MON., Tim M4 win. 

"KM lady" 

Klhel nnrryrnord Maurlco Evans 

SECOND FEATURE 

"fnrMLJiP* 

Ocor«o Ra ft, Vir ginia Mayo 

Tt/MDAY NIGHT 1* rOTO 
NIGHT 

Omr Off m 

MM* 
ft* fill 



Suits seek their first win to- 
night os .Stouffville Clippers 
come to canallowii. The Shcw- 
chuk-8mith outfit having drop* 
per three in n row ore frothing 
at the mouth and ready for raw 
meat. It v/os 7-2 for tho Clip- 
pers on Tuesday, with Blake 
J?atough, former goalie for Wes- 
ton juniors ami Hnimpton Jun- 
ior, turning in a great game for 
Stouffville. Normie Htund«n 
will likely he in the visitors' net 
tonight which doesn't Improve 
matters any. 

Nick ttuirguy, Herbie Rose, 
Moe Pctch, former Aurora jun- 
ior, Jackie Watson, Geo. Stark, 
Jack liumney (Aurora Indians), 
and oil tho rest need no intro- 
duction to the fans. It should 
he a pipperoo and don't soil (ho 
Spits short as they might have 
won at one stogo in Stnuffvlllo. 

Aurora Hears meat Fergus 
Thistles in a Junior tilt at Au- 
rora, on Friday nlfht mid tho 

lieara with a nlco 5-3 win ovur 
Elmira and n tie with Nnhlotnn 
v/ill go into Hit; games as favor- 
ites, Fergus dropped two pro- 
season games to Elmira, 7-1 and 
12-4, hut are said to he improved. 
In any event tho Dears will hu 
ail out to win, and tho junior 
race looks fo ho a dandy ona 
from start to finish. Tho O.H.A. 
with Kerugus loading Iho vau 
tried to hoont Aurora to 'C" rat- 
ing, hut Iho Hears will havo their 
hands full to host Kimtni, and 
Nnhleton havo shown they can 
hold their own with tho Class 
clan. No need lo mention Hint 
Ifespulor will likuly ho tho 
creajn of the crop. 

With good light group games, 
Iho team can and will maka Iho' 
playoffs out of Iho red. No ww 

thinking of Iho Nnhleton gnmo 
again. Wowing a first period 
2-0 lend, the Dears let tho King 
kfds hull lliam around and play 
tor len minutes and finally lucky 
to win. Kownlreo will havo |o 
crack tho whip on one or two 
of tho squad who am a hit can- 
tankerous. 

Keith ttrilinxs was Iho star 
from an Aurora angio with two 
goals, and his clover pivot work 
made rookies llnhby Forhun and 
Stow Wilson look mighty good. 
Tills trio Is tho best Rowntrco 
has right now. Artie Barber is 
duo to Join tho club again, ond 
win soo action next week. Tho 
popular redhead has plenty of 
got-up ond go, and may revive 
tho play of ono or two of his 
last year's mates, 

lift heplt'i Choices Mondsy 
brought both good and bad luck 
to some of our sports friends m 

voters went to the polls in msny 

municipalities; A). LukmH, 
bftcktr of I«wby ■ptritsuulan 
wdtnt can* «nd "jwfcjjtft" ft* 



yachting supporter, bashed down 
"Duck" McCnllum, whose Grey 
Cup welcome lo tho Queen City 
and tour do luxe lo tho Calgary 
Stampede did so much good for 
"Toronto tho Good" with the 
rest of Canada, 

Not too many prominent 
sportsmen on tho Toronto list, 
hut Ken Waters, past president 
of O, M. II. A, anil ox-Queens 
Yorks officer, made Iho Hoard of 
Education and Kom Mpsett, al- 
derman for Ward »» was n well 
known footbalolr and lacrosse 
player n few years ago. In the 
county, John Perry, Mnule drug- 
gist and former Aurora high nth- 
lele, made Iho grade for council 
In Vaughan. Fretl Armstrong, 
onco known as "Pempsoy" to la- 
crosse fans at Richmond Hill and 
Wiodln-ldge, howled over Heave 
Grant Hendorson in a somewhat 
HLirptialng win, while Bayard 
Bryant, well known Loglonulro 
ami ox-zone sports officer and 
district sports officer, was elect- 
ed to council along with Leo 
Watson, ye erihhago ow<n1» and 
father of two up-and-coming 
young junior "H" luickoylats, 

In Markham township. All. 
l.CHiuasurlert backer of UuUm- 
villo Jets, made n council Heat 
and with regret wo learned of 
the defeat as depuly-reove of 
Dalian Humnoy, a great hockey 
booster and father of the well- 
Jack and fleorgo Dumnoy; Floyd 
Perkins, one of tho area's best 
known bowlers and ono-tlme 
high school athlete, was elected 
to council at Richmond Hill and 

Tom Taylor of tho Sutton Tay- 
lors, of hnisehalt and hockey 
fame, was acclaimed aa veovo 
succeeding ox-Aurornn Hill 
Neal, falhor of Hill Jr, and San- 
dy, who need no introduction. 

Keith Nisfcet of Aurora High- 
lands and badminton and Irani* 
star, ami Jack Of ford of tho 
Aurora Recreation Com mi as ion 
and long-timo boaster of sports, 
especially cycling (romemlwr 
those good old duya of Aurora 
Cycling Club?) got woll-doHorv* 
oil acclamations to tho Aurora 
School Board, Cluffer Vanfcant, 
was a strong runner at Newmar- 
ket as wan Joe "Optimist" D^len, 
ex-track star. Sorr to *oo that 

fine sportsman Frank BoWfftr 
miss out, Joe BpilJett*, of 
course, got a free pass as deputy- 
reovo and rumor ho* it that Joe 
will bo battling it out with Au- 
rora's Ace Cook, that is provid- 
ing Mr. Cook bests Stew, Patrick 
Who is contesting tho rtevoihip, 
Mr. Cook U the father of Bobs, 
Cook who plays . with Aurora 
Bearr , end previous to that, sons 

Jimmy ana Francis were keen 
athlete* Stew, besides beta* a 

referee and promoter, is 

there! Howie Patrick* 



players inside the metropolitan 
area. Newmarket can't reach in- 



BearsTieAway 

Aurora Bears hit the road on 
Tuesday. They were visitors to 
Nobleton for the latter's Junior 
D group opener. The Closs- 
Rowntrce charges didn't come 
back with a win but did the 
next best thing, earning a 5-all 

tie in overtime. 

The Bears protected a 4-2 ad- 
vantage until the midway mar); 
of the third. Keith Collins* 
spearheaded Aurora's early at- 
tack with two goal?. Grant Ed- 
wards and Bob Forhan were 

pay-dirt hitter* for single*. At 

.this stage an Aurora penalty 
Around tho Province: Erie parade hit hard. 
White, of lacrosse fame, made « Nobleton took advantage of 
the grade for n second term to ! man-power advantage to run in 
council at Fergus; Dick Butler J two quickies to tie it and fore* 



We got one peek at the smart- 
ly labelled "Secret Formula - 
Bush's Special". It looked harm- 
less. In search of facts, this 
corner enquired particulars: "Do 
you drink it?-Smeli it? Or apply 
it?" 

"Listen bud," Eddie quips, 

"don't get nosey and don't smile! 
This stuffs dynamite - patent 
rights ore worth a fortune. You 

watch it work tonight," 

We did and so did .1,100 glum 
patrons, Eddie had his Blue 
Mountain juice under guard and 
whisked everybody out of the 
dressing room and his gestapo 
checked identity cards before it 
came in full view. 

We didn't witness the unveiling 
of the magic potion but that's 
what we learned from the inner 
circle - jingos, it must have been 
a potent brew. Look what hap- 
pened to our spits! Well, like 
the chappte says, one game 
don't make a hockey season. You 
can bet your boots Collingwood 
have hung their last 9-4 mark 
on our Spits. 

Thursday's statistics didn't .con- 
ceal the fact the Shipbuilders arc 
improved over last year' - least- 
wise that's the way it looked 
from our angle. Then again, the 
Spits were for below par in this, 
their initial outing in the Big 
Five campaign, and facts and 
figures from Saturday's north- 
ward jaunt bears this out. 

Surprised to see Boss Hoch- 
berg on the Spits defense? Wel- 
come as the flowers in spring, 
yes indeed. An O.H.A, gift. How 
come? you ask. Simple. Ross 
lives in Uxbridge. That's out- 
side the metropolitan area. 
Stouffville only have rights to f thiag berassse $2» £ina eriu|&3% 



Thus the O.H.A. ruled the effec- 
tive, fast-skating, rear-guard was 
Spits property. 

And a jolly well welcome ad- 
dition if we do say so. It makes 
the Spits defense corps one of the 
strongest - probably the strongest 
- in the Big Five with Ai Shew- 
chuk, Boss Hochberg, Jack An- 
drews, Bill Mc€hee and "Fink 1 * 
Tunstead ready and willing to 
bounce the on-coming chargers. 

Spits wore Pickering College 
rugby sweaters for the opener - 
new sweaters hadn't arrived. 
Those high figures like ZZ, & 
and 72 didn't brinjj 'em any #»& 
it seems. Diri lrr>k like they 
thoew a few rugby bkeka and 
more than held their r*-vn in the 
wrestling demonstration* - few 
left over from summer grappling 
campaign no doubt - as they 
went about getting the fail &mt 
on record. 

Now, this comer u aa happy 
as the next one to tee a hula 
side-board scrimmaging - f<u* 
cakes and cookies that ui - hue 
we can't cotton *n th* fans join- 
ing in. Edd;<i Buafc was justifi- 
ably riled up stent ^ ;&& on the 
chops he received . &m ;frat;a . 
from one fan. 

May ***rn a fct #£ fun for th« 
spectator to git Iz a few fclffe ac 
the opposition darfe* ^c tiihnir- 
the-boardj metsei out aiavara 
aren't usually exper.twif a iida- 
belt from tte cuaV,rr,era. It does 
little to add p:eatic{* V. any taam. 
or arena. 

Fact is, »e r«ca2I a 5rv 7*ar3 
back wjm t&s &MJL smd the 
riot act ted c&s<fc£ dewt am* 
Ontario zitk ft* £ia$ ^ia m&i 



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former O. II. A. president, is 
reeve of Lindsay; Charlie Par- 
ker, especially noted for his 
work in gals Softball, is back as 
headman at Midland (HockeyUt 
Fat Swales was defeated as al- 
derman); llanuw Kebt, an old 
friend from Queens U., and a 
good man at football and hockey, 
was elected reevo of Prvstoa; 
Hummer SUrllnjr, great football- 
er of yesteryear, tops at St. 
Thomas; Jack Orr, used to play 
football for Maple, and for Wit- 
lowdale, later was C.S.M. of 44 C" 
squadron, Queens Yorks, elected 

Hydro Commissioner in North 
York. 

Vlowmeu rememlH>red by the 

voters were Win STimbers (Whit- 
chureh), lt*d TU»ben (Mark* 
huuO and llebor lH>wns (Pick* 
erintt), all recviM too. Coming up 
for elecllou are RIM Parks, a 
Hroat hotkey booster at Sutton; 
Jim Murray, town league* proxy 
at Aurora, and Mali* Ttttke.r 
chairman of tho Wflklo Kuud. 
flutoath Rock Falls In tho far 
north endorsed Sunday sports by 
a whomping majority. 

niuellno Hantor: Rex Bailey, 
classy defencoman of lust year's 
Aurora Hears, is |>orformlnK for 
Oakvlilo Junior "B" club and do- 
ing nicely. Med MHehelt has 
his Lindsay club ottt In front io 
the lough Kastern, "IV circuit* 
Youngest player in Junior °1V Is 
Henny Garner from Barrio, son 
of that good sparhnan, Bill Gar- 
ner, who at 14 years of ifgo is 
ploying with woston Dukes. 
Snatched from right under Hap 
Emma' noso too. Hap Holme*, 
readying a good club at St. An* 
draw's College. A gamo with 
Aurora Boars would be a mighty 
nico attraction for some charf* 
tnbto causo, St, Andrew 9 *' has 
antdhor redhot basketball club, 
who aro romping through pro* 
aseason opposition with ease. 

Rob rater* tooted mighty 
keen in his first O.H.A. job of tho 
season. "Tho Silent One" i« 
about ready for somo higher as- 
signments by thd O.H.A. Ron 
Simmons works well with him aa 
linesman. Former O.H.A. play- 
ets, ; othor than from junior 
ranks, are now barred from par- 
ticipation in tho .rant .aerk*. 

This will strike a severe blow at 
centres like Sutton West, Brad, 
ford, etc, Inttnaedlate hockey 
is drawing good crowds at 
Stouffville arena with a six*to*m 
buih iQRgue of Stouffville, 
PMchN, Aflncourt, Uxbridge, 

Laniin* and Rivaroal* Imper- 
ial!, Plenty of familiar face* 
fcattertd throufh the playing 
rotten* 



quick; 
the teams into overtime. Joe 
Gasko racked up the alt-import- 
ant overtime counter that earn- 
ed tho Bears a division of the 
points after Nobleton pushed 
tie-breaker past Joe Burke in 
the early minute* of overtime 
session. 



SPORTS CAWWK 

(December tt • t«> 
Dec. 6, 13M> p.u.. Newmarket 
Arena, Big Five Senior, Aid- 
laud vs Newmarket Spitfire*. 

Dec. 7. » *»W p,at.» Aurvra 
Areaa. Junior O.H.A., *«t*-lh v» 

Aurora *'Hear» v : » pm-> Noble- 
toa Arena, Ktog-Vaugh. Amble- 
header, Sehomberg vs Kettleby, 
King v« Kleloburg, 

lYee. 10, 1M »,»., Newmarket 
Areaa, Newmarket * District, 
twla-WU, Office Specialty va 
Mount Albert; Town Regent* vs 
Vauitorf* 

Uec* >J, • p*m , Aurora Area*, 
Aurora town League twla-bil^ 
Hotehuen v* Bitch Digg*r% 
OafteHi Area vs Vtctory Flyen; 
MS p.w., Aurora Arena, Ladtea* 
Hockey, Fast Vork vi Aurora 
Ladlcti Ml p«-, MWUud Arena, 
Hlg Five Senior, Newmarket 

Spitfire* v* Mtdtaud. 
Uec. 19, IM p,w., Nobletw 

Arena, Klng.Vauihau Hockey 
Iieague, SehotDberg v* King 
"Maroona"! 1.3ft jmu., Fergua 
Arena, Juaior O.HA , Aurora 
''Bean" v* Fergu*. 



fc* coatroll*d <a wm!dnl\ a« imtr. 
trolled. Voko- y^ar ^in^zumt- 
but leave th* *c-ib*-o» jcp»^- 
ping to the ^ladiiSoc^.- . 
' D^a*tK«arry<?«.t^«aif.?a«|| 
tnatgic breTr that h --;sa «TO5^sats^ 
in th* Auxcra cpec>r^ 
Rowntree* Weodtefiige 

chkkea m^ber, :2aua't 5;«a 3£t 
majic te*ich £a fettiaj ta* i^ti 

cut of jusSer h>Aty u!kaal Aa^ 
rora B-eorf wr* tfcwcyElii if%&^--- 
win be^cre €*» pw«a«ii joawmjw 
It w3s» a peachy face* aa>£ rwjtd 
off at a lofrird puce. Asjreca fins. 
had b*5ter vaje up - ihoz^s fO&Ofi", 
to b^ $#&& fin* &x*k>**c ites$ wio* 
ter arv$ ktep a weather eye $x» 
the Bej« - theyN-e s$t wSaning : 

Election Returns- Ceograt* fe>T 
sjvrtwr-aa CharUe VanZaat ca 
hU re-election. Note Jtrosiy 
Murra>\ Aurora, ha* thrown h^ 
hat in the rin$. Qcod luck $ir* 




SIFT 



AN EVINRUDE 
CHRISTMAS 
TOA 

SPORTSMAN 



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ajuaoNAi. nucia 

NOW r«s V AIUNO 

HOmSMTS 

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Stew Pttritk For 
Lome Evans for Deputy 

Disdainfully ignoring Mayor Bell's crude attack 
on his election pronouncement, published in last week's 
issue Of Aurora News Page, Dr. Crawford Rose, can- 
didate for the mayoralty of Aurora in 1952, elevated 
the tone of the nomination meeting to a high standard 
by a brilliant address which received great applause 
from his attentive hearers. 

He surveyed hydro work and, and has been the recipient of 

numerous testimonials 



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NORTHJND 

WttH the StiUm, 



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PAGE NINE 



THURSDAY, THE SIXTH DAY OF DECEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FIFTY-ONE 



In the limited time at his dis- 
posal, set out briefly a program 
calculated to restore good local 
government in Aurora. It is 

felt that by returning Dr. Craw- 
ford Rose as mayor of the town, 
Aurora will once again have a 
head of council who will give to 
it dignity, prestige, and experi- 
enced methods of handling busi- 
ness. 

There has been a sharp recoil 
of public opinion in Aurora 
since nomination night, when a 
record audience was subjected 
to harangues of abuse and near- 
slanderous statements on the 
part of Mayor Bell and Reeve 
Cook. Many electors who for- 
merly supported Bell and Cook, 
have now expressed their de- 
termination to work for the cer- 
tain election of Dr. Rose, as a 
protest against the injury done 
to the reputation of Aurora's 
standard of fair play by the 
abusive attacks made on Aurora 

News Page and Its editor by 

Mayor Bel! and Reeve Cook. 
Stew Patrick For Reeve 

The decision of Mr. Stewart 
Patrick to oppose Reeve Cook 
has been received in Aurora 
with great popularity. Stew Pat- 
rick is a popular sporting figure 
es well as a keen and very suc- 
cessful business man. He was 
on council for a number of years 
and is thoroughly conversant 
with town affairs. He has a 
large business stake in the town 
and M a big taxpayer. Unlike 
Mr. Cook, he did not appeal his 
increased assessments. 

Stew Patrick is a man who 
makes decisions and does not 
"sit on the fence." That is one 
important difference between 
himself end the present holder 
of the of/ice of reeve. Mr. Pat- 
rick does not subscribe to a 
policy of dilly-dally, or handing 
a job on for someone else to do. 
Ho prefers action and his selec- 
tion as reeve would give energy 
to the office. He is essentially 
a man's man and he is a good 
mixer. He has done a very 
great deal in promoting spqrt 



in honor 

of his services. 

It is generally felt that the 

time has come when Mr. Cook 

should go out of office with 

others of the "Old Gang 1 ' who 
are retiring this year, and make 
room for a successful candidate 
to fill his place. It is generally 
recognized that Mr. Cook as 
reeve has failed the town in 
1951. Mr. Patrick's decision to 
oppose him is rapidly gaining in 
popularity. 
Lome P. Evans 

In his brief address on nomin- 
ation night, Deputy-Reeve Jas. 
Murray admitted that it had not 
been his intention to seek re- 
election this year; but gave no 
reasons why he had changed 
his mind. He further admitted 
that his business interests would 
suffer through another year in 
the office of deputy-reeve. In 
these circumstances, opinions 
have been expressed that it 
would be unfair to him to elect 
him to the office. 

Mf: Evans* address greatly im- 
pressed the nomination meeting. 
It covered a wide range of prac- 
tical proposals, and his declara- 
tion that he was firmly opposed 
to any further expenditure on 
the planning board's consultant 
was received with general ap- 
plause by his listeners. He also 
pointed to the need of an inde- 
pendent assessment Court of Re- 
vision. 

Voters who last year support- 
ed Mr. Murray arc saying that 
such support will be given to 
Mr. Evans In this year's contest. 
Whatever influence has been 
brought on Murray to change his 
earlier decision to retire, Xt is 
felt that In fairness to him he 
should be allowed to carry out 
that decision in his business in- 
terests. 

Mr. Lome Evans has had wide 
municipal experience, which 
would be of great value to Au- 
rora at this time, when planning 
board and other town costs 
should be reduced. His election 
W^uld prove a popular choice. 



COUNCIL REPORT 



i 






While Citizen Collects Mail 
He Also Gets Parking Ticket 
Six Appeals Municipal Board 

A regular meeting of the town council was held 
In the council chamber on Monday night, December 3, 
with all members present, A highlight of the proceed- 
ings was the announcement that six leading industries 
and firms were appealing assessor E. It. Good's rulings 
to the municipal board. 



Correspondence included a let- 
ter from the town solicitor od- 
&' vising council that the Inner 
i Spring Mattress company was 
f , not disposed to sell any of its 
v property, which had been under 
consideration for town uses. 

Mr. W* A. Sutherland sent a 
letter protesting a parking 
ticket* which, he alleged, had 
been issued while he called at 
the post office for his mail, and 
white he waited at the postal 
p.... wicket. The writer said he had 



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no objection to meters, but con- 
sidered the method he complain- 
ed of was going too far. 
Appeal Municipal Board 

The industries and firms pro- 
posing appeals to the municipal 
board in respect of their assess- 
ments are: ColHs Leather, T. 
Sisman Shoe Company; Hart 
Manufacturing; Aurora Milling, 
Factory Equipment and Mr, A. 
Lome Cousins, 

Other BtulneM ■ 

A report on parking meters 
is to bo prepared by the town 
clerk. 

Councillor Jones requested 
that better lighting be provided 
at the parking space, and that 
action be taken at once. 

It was resolved that Decem- 
ber 26 be proclaimed Boxing 
Day and a holiday. 

Proposed extensions on Dun- 
ning Ave. bo handed over to 
streets committee. Council ad- 
journed at 10 p.m. 




EDITORIALS 



MAYOR'S VOTE DECIDED 

The opportunity which the majority i>f the citizens 
of Aurora have asked for has now come. On Monday, 
December 10, they can choose a new Mayor for the 
year 1952, and we trust they will do so in no uncertain 
manner. It is our purpose in this editorial to show why 
we shall vote for, and in other ways support, Dr. Craw- 
ford Rose. 

Let us say at once that we did not agree with Dr. 
Rose in regard to the substance of the controversy 
over the new hydro building. What we said then we 
would still say, without the alteration of a single word. 
Apart from our strong dislike of the appearance of 
the building, which is a matter of opinion, there are 
stronger reasons that it offended against the town 
building by-laws which ordinary citizens are called on 
to comply with. 

However, the final word did not rest with hydro 
commissioner Dr., Rose. When the deciding vote was 
taken Mayor Bell had the last word. He could have 
cast his deciding vote with those who were insisting 
that the hydro be compelled to conform with the build- 
ing by-laws. He did not do so. Instead of taking that 
course he cast his deciding vote along with the votes of 
Reeve Cook, Councillors Fielding, Gundy and Pringle. 

As head of council Mayor Bell did not stand by 
the building by-laws he helped to put through in March, 
1950. The hydro was a test, and he failed to pass the 
test He did not give a lead to council. He voted against 
the very by-laws he had helped to make for other people. 
Had he cast his decking vote with those who supported 
the building by-laws, the hydro building would have 
had to conform. 

Having regard to these facts, which cannot be dis- 
puted, and the even more important fact that Mayor 
Bell was chairman of the building permits committee 
that granted a building permit to the hydro, he must 
accept the chief responsibility in the whole matter. In 
the final summing up the hydro building on Mosley 
street stands as it is today because of Mayor Bell's 
casting vote. The last word was his. 

■ 

TIME FOR CHANGE 

The time for a change at the head of the council 
chamber is long overdue. We need not repeat over 
again the many reasons we have given in past months 
why that change is necessary. During the past year 
there has been a continuing decline in council prestige, 
resulting chiefly from waste of time, and time spent 
on matters that have produced only vexatious contro- 
versy, such as planning board by-laws, and especially 
the contentious zoning by-law, not to mention the 
meters. 

The truth is, people have begun to lose confidence 
in the usefulness of the town council. So much so that 

we have heard citizens say that the best thing that 
could happen would be for the council to go out of 
existence altogether. That is a truly deplorable state 
of mind, but it has been brought on through events of 
the present year. 

Thti town council is vital to the people of Aurora. 
It is their local parliament and in the hands of good 
councillors great good for the town can come from it. 
But the first essential is a good head of council, The 
first essential is a man who can conduct the business 
Trf council with knowledge and understanding. 

Hero is what a member of the present council said 
to us after hearing that Dr. Crawford Rose was to be 
a candidate for the mayoral chair in 1952. We have 
great respect for the councillor who spoke these words, 
and these are his words: "I served under Dr. Rose for 
two years and he was a splendid chairman, I never 
expect to serve under a better. All members of council 
got their fair chance to say what they wanted to say, 
But Dr. Rose never wasted time, Ho understood the 
business of council, and could give guidance if and 
when it was needed, I would like to see him back 
again." We wore very greatly influenced to support 
Dr. Rose by such words from an experienced member 
of council. 

ELECT DR. ROSE MAYOR 

Writing this article the day before nominations, 

we have to state that our personal knowledge of Dr, 
Crawford Rose is restricted to one long conversation 
we had with him, ah interview given at our request. 
We sought clarification on certain points and wo were 
fully satisfied. Wo told Dr. Rose that wo would reflect 
on our conversation, since we never write in a hurry. 
\Vo would also hear what he had to any at the nomina- 
tion meeting. 

The impressions wo gathered from our talk with 
Dr. Roso were that he shares many of the views that 
have been expressed in Aurora News Pages in regard 
to the waste of money on planning board consultations, 
though he is in favor of a planning board whoso purpose 
would bo purely advisory to council. Ho believes, as 
we believe, in tho supremacy of the town council as 
tho chief executivo authority, and is strongly opposed 
to tho zoning by-law now before council.. 

Dr. Roso is a beliovor in tho fullest freedom of 
the press, and holds tho sensible viow that it should 
have access to Hydro, High and Public school business, 
since these are all parts of the local economy. 

Tho election of Dr, Crawford Rose to tho office 
of Mayor would give vigor and buoyancy to town af- 
fairs. Ho would restore to that office a dignity it has 
lost in recent years. While this newspaper will at all 
times express its own independent views, whoever is 
Mayor of the town of Aurora, wo urge all voter* to 
return Dr. Roso aa Mayor for 1952, Give him and 
tha new council cenftknet through a record vote. 



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NOMINATION NIGHT 

Mayor Bell And Reeve C 
Lambast Aurora News Editor 

* . 

- 

And The Victim Gives Reply 

The Mechanics' Hall was crowded to capacity on 

Friday night, November 30, for the municipal nomina- 
tions. This was the same hall that council resolved to 
sell or rent to industry, in January of this present 
year, and it was so advertised for two weeks. It 
will always be a proud memory for us that through 
our newspaper crusade we aroused public opinion in 
Aurora and saved the hall for the use of the citizens. 
But for that newspaper crusade Aurora would not 
have a Community Hall today. 

After the nominations were few months. While that is 



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concluded. Mayor Bell came up 

on to the stage. He spent little 

time in defending either his 
past work or outlining a pro- 
gram for the future. He men* 
tioned meters, but gave no state- 
ment on them. He referred to 
an editorial of ours concerning 
Mr. William Large and stated 
that he resigned. Mr. Large did 
resign; tut that was not the end 
of the story. 

The end came suddenly on the 
morning of Tuesday, January 16, 
1951, when Mr. Large was re- 
lieved of his positions as assist- 
ant town clerk and secretary. 
treasurer to the Aurora hydro 
commission. Three men were 
concerned in relieving Mr. Large 
of the positions he had success- 
fully held for a number of years. 
They were Mr, George Baldwin, 
chairman of the hydro commis- 
sion, Mayor Bell and Reeve 
Cook. 

It seems a pity that since 
Mayor Bell told his audience 
that Mr. Large had resigned that 
he did not go on from there and 
say how the resignation had 
been rescinded by council .on 
January 15, 1951, and how mat- 
ters stood on the morning of 
January 16, 1951, when Mr. 
Large was relieved of his jobs. 
Had Mayor Bell told the whole 
story his listeners might have 
drawn a sharp breath. 

* It was a matter of deep regret 
to us that as we were not the 
owner or the publisher of the 
Aurora Banner, but only a con- 
tributor, we could not publish 
the complete story. Wc felt then 
that this old-time trustworthy 
town employee did not, in all the 
circumstances, get a square deal, 
and we still think that. 

Lambasting Us! 

It was obvious, however, that 
Mayor Bell was thirsting to get 
on with another Job dearer to 
his heart and of greater solace 
to his wounded pride. Mayor 
Bell likes being mayor of the 
town. And we have dared to 
criticise him! Why have we 
criticised him? Certainly not for 
personal reasons, since we have 
no interest whatever in Mr. Bell 
as a private individual. 

It has been our business to ob- 
serve Mayor Bell on council 
work for a period of almost two 
years. Regretfully we have to 
state that he is the least compe- 
tent occupant of a mayoral chair 



tangible proof of the confidence 
that readers have In our sin- 
cerity, it may not please Mayor 
Bell. 

So on Friday evening he start- 
ed out to lambast us. He drag- 
ged in every little episode, real 
and imaginary, that he fancied 
could build up a case against us. 
He even brought in some ragged 
recollections of an address we 
gave to the Aurora Lions club 
in April last ant* *ot it hope- 
lessly mixed up. 
He Did It Himself! 

A more pitiable exhibition we 

have not seen or heard in many 
years. His emotion overcame 

such powers of reasoning as are 
peculiarly his own, so that his 
voice sometimes rose to a so- 
prano tempo. "Of course I own 
the Banner," he added facetious- 
ly, 4, but haven't seen any profits 
yet." We never said he owned 
the Banner; on good authority 
we suggested that he was a part- 
owner. That he did not deny, 
nor does it matter. For the Ban- 
ner is only the Banner and no- 
thing more. 

The Mayor of Aurora did not 
take time out to tell his inter- 
ested listeners what achieve- 
ments he had accomplished, i 
There were apparently none to 
record. He spoke not one word 
about a future program. Pre- 
sumably he has none but the 
zoning by-law and even that is 
not his. All he will do is help 
to pass it if he remains mayor. 
His vociferations were pitiable 
In the extreme. It was a truly 
painful exhibition. But the peo- 
ple of Aurora gathered in the 
Mechanics* hall did have a full 
opportunity of sizing up their 
present mayor. Ho di'3 it him- 
self. 

We did not begrudge him his 
little lambasting excursion. 
Mayor Bell did not harm us. He 
harmed only himself. If Mr. 
Bell suffered an injury to his 
reputation he has only himself 
to blame. It was he who did it, 
nil by himself. 
"Such Childish WrUln* 1 * 

Next to the Btage came Reeve 
Cook, brief case in hand. He did 
not have anything to say this 
year on becoming warden of 
York county. No doubt he real- 
izes it wasn't worth while. No 
use whipping an old dead horse. 



we have ever known, There He hadn't much to Bay on any- 



must always be a better and a 
worse. One must judge these 

matters from the record. All the 

major questions Mayor Bell has 

handled In the past two years 

have produced Intense divisions 
of public opinion In Aurora. 
None more so than planning 
board by-laws, tho hydro and 
the meters. 

It has been our job to writo 
detailed, impartial accounts of 
the Aurora council, so that tho 
citizens would know what was 
going on. We have hidden no- 
thing. We have told the citizens 
all that we knew of council 
work. As on editor wc have ex- 
amined council work, pointing 
out to our roadera defects as we 
sow thorn, This apparently has 
often offended him. Tho sales 
of our newspaper have also In- 
creasod rapidly during tho past 



thing else except us. Then there 
was blood in his eye! He was 

out. for the kill and Banner re* 
porters got very busy, 

With his papers on the po- 
dium, like a minister preaching 
his farewell sermon, Reeve Cook 
read a few lines and then broke 
down. He had missed the lino 
and it took him some time to 
find it again. Wo thought he 
might bo looking for aomo fig- 
ures to enlighten his audience 
on why he was able to get $10,- 
000 knocked off an aiflessmcnt 
on one of his properties,' But ho 
didn't say ono word about it. 

It was ourselves ho was af- 
tor. Ho would like to have kill- 
ed our News Pages, full of "such 
childish writings." Even Dr. 
Malcolm the squirrel suffered a 
blast. Ho lampooned and lam* 
(Continued on Pago 10, Col. 5> 



Minutes Incorrect 



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i 



Aurora News Page calls the 
attention of Mayor Bell and 
members of council present at 
its Slat meeting held on Novem- 
ber 8, 1851, to tho fact that tho 
minutes of that meeting are not 
correct, although thoy wore ap- 
proved by council on Monday 

night, December 3. 

On November 5, 1051, Mr, W, 
E> Korr roprcsontcd a delega- 
tion which appeared bofaro 
council roqucating tho removal 



of tho press ban Imposed by 
Mayor Bell. Tho delation's re- 
quest proved successful, follow- 
ing a longthy debate in which 
all members of council present 
took part, 

No mention whatever is mndo 
of such a dolgnlion or its out- 
come in tho minutes. There is 
consequently no record of that 
important ovent, and tho min- 
utes aro not In ordor and should 
not have been approved. 



Rowland's 




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Agent For Era Classified Ada 

13 Yonge Si. Aaron 

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PAGCTEN 



THURSDAY. THE SIXTH DAY OF DECEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FIFTY-ONE 



REPORT AND COMMENT 

* 

Panel Of Council Candidates 
Six Seats Need Being Filled 
W. E. Kerr For Hydro Commr. 

Never in the long civic history of Aurora have 
there been such crowds, and such intense interest shown, 
at a nomination meeting as on Friday night, November 
30. The newly-decorated Mechanics' Hall was filled to 
capacity, with large numbers of people standing 
throughout the proceedings. The bitter attacks on 
Aurora News Page3 and its editor by Mayor Bell and 
Reeve Cook were applauded by some of their supporters 
and received by some boos and cries of "sit down" in 
other parts of the hail. 



So great was the interest 
shown in the elections, promoted 
by the detailed reporting of 
council matters in Aurora News 
Pages, that nominations for the 
council, hydro commission, and 
the public school board were of 
record proportions. There were 
13 nominations for the six coun- 
cil seats; five nominations for 
two hydro vacancies; and eight 
nominations for three appoint- 
ments to the public school board. 

For the office of mayor, four 
nominations were made; three 
for the reeveship; and two for 
deputy-reeve. Withdrawals re- 
duced these numbers to two 
contestants for the mayoral chair, 
namely, the present mayor, Alex 
Bell and Dr. Crawford Rose, who 
was Mayor of Aurora in the 
years 1948-49. 

For the reeveship the contest 
will be between the present hol- 
der of the office, A. A. Cook, 
and a former member of council 
and well-known business man 
and townsman. Stew Patrick. 

For the office of deputy-reeve 
Mr. Lome P. Evans will oppose 
Mr. James Murray, who has been 
deputy-reeve during 1951. 

Councillors Davies, Gundy and 
Pringle announced that they 
would not be candidates for any 
office In the present elections. 

Out Of The Gutter! 

After the audience had been 
rescued from the gutter of abuse 
into which it had been unexpec- 
tedly drawn by Mayor Bell and 
Reeve Cook, some interesting 
speeches followed. None was 
better than the all-too-brief ad- 
dress of veteran councillor Jones. 
His description of the meters as 
"mechanical thieves" brought ap- 
plause, as did his declared oppo- 
sition to the passing into law of 
the zoning by-law and any fur- 
ther costs to an out-of-town con- 
sultant. He ridiculed the zon- 
ing map which he said was no 
more than a map in color of the 
town as it stands. 

Mr. Jones said he was in favor 
of town planning but was op- 
posed to the system which had 
been in operation. He presented 
a fine schedule of work accom- 
plished by the town property 
committee of which he is chair- 
man. He Is still definitely op- 
posed to meters and to the hydro 
building "being left on the 

street," some eight inches, more 
or leas. 

Councillor Corbett, chairman 
of the Fire and Water Dcpt-, gave 
an excellent account of his de- 
partment) urging that tha town 
should have another reservoir. 

Mr, Corbett" paid the highest 
tribute to the town Fire Brigade, 
saying It was a great credit to 
the town. 

Mr. 0. J. Murray, son of the 
popular Archie Murray, for so 
many years proprietor of the 
Queen's hotel and former mem- 
ber of town council, made one 
of the moat impressive speeches 
of the evening. He was speaking 
as a candidate for council* and 
the opplauso which greeted hi* 
remarks were a fine augury for 
his election. We hope the elec- 
tors will put him high up In the 
polls, for his address gave evi- 
dence of a clear understanding of 
urgent town problems. Ho paid 
trihuto to his father, to whom 
he said he was deeply indebted 
for an understanding of council 
procedure. 
Other Candidates 

Date King, the youngest of the 
candidate* and who is a master 

at St, Andrew's college, made an 
excellent Impression on his list- 
eners, He Is the son of o well- 
known family, his father, the late 
W. C, King, was manager of the 
Bank of Montreal In Aurora, for 



"LIONS DEN 



II 



Don Glass Asserts That 
Banner Report Is Wrong 



several years, and his mother 
owns the antique store on Yonge 
St. 

We believe Dale King will 
make an excellent member of 
council. While at McGill uni- 
versity he was vice-president of 
a council of 1.500 veterans. We 
hope to see him elected on Mon- 
day, Dec. 10. 

Clarence Davis, nominated for 
council, was unable through 
another appointment to stay after 
nomination, and the audience did 
not hear an address from him. 
We know, however, that he is 
definitely opposed to the further 
expenditure of money on plan- 
ning board work, and is intent 
on keeping down town expenses 
if elected to council, 

Mr. Davis is a member of one 
of Aurora's oldest families, and 
both his father and grand-father 
were members of Aurora's town 

councils. He is so well-known 
as a business man in town that 
his reputation carries its own 

recommendation to the electors. 

He would make an excellent 

member of council. 

Mr. Ralph Tucker, as we have 
previously mentioned, missed 
victory by only 22 votes last year. 
He should easily make the grade 
this year. With his wide and 
responsible business experience, 
he would bring to council valu- 
able training for local civic prob- 
lems. We hope the electors will 

give Mr. Tucker the opportun- 
ity he is socking to serve the 
town which is his home. 

W. E. Kerr For Hydro 

For the hydro commission we 
strongly recommend to the elec- 
tors the choice of Mr. W. E. Kerr, 
an able business man of long ex- 
perience, and whose name be- 
came widely known to the citi- 
zens of Aurora through his suc- 
cessful appeal to get Mayor Bell's 
ban on the freedom of the press 
removed. 

He would bring an impartial 
judgment to bear on hydro mat- 
ters. If elected he would support 
the taxpayers being informed on 
everything their local hydro is 
doing through the press, and that 
wx>uld be something chairman 
Mr. George Baldwin has opposed 
for years. Mr. Baldwin wants 
to keep the press out; Mr. Kerr 
wants the press in, so that the 
people will know what is going 

on inside the building where 
their taxes are paid. 

There was a "bad smell" in 
January of this year, caused by 
goings-on at the hydro, when 
Mr. William Large was relieved 
of his duties as secretary-treas- 
urer, positions now held by the 
superintendent. If the press had 
sat in on the enquiries the people 
would have* known what was 
going on. Mr. Baldwin opposed 
the press sitting In. So the Au- 
rora citizens arc still very much 
in the dark on what really hap- 
pened. 

If elected as a hydro commis- 
sioner, Mr. W. E. Kerr would 
cure all that, for he Is in favor 
of the people knowing what is 
going on at the hydro. For such 
reasons wo shall vote for Mr. 
Kerr and strongly urge other 
electors to do the same. 

As for Mr. Baldwin he did not 
know at Friday night's meeting 
if he were still a member of the 
hydro commission! But ho was 
sure on this: He would bo back 
again If possible. We never did 
believe he intended to resign; 
now we know. The threats of 

resignation were eyewash, or, as 

some people would say, Just plain 
bluff. 

The pelt of the bcaver-*Can- 
adn's national emblem — was 
once a form of currency In Can- 
ada, 



In its issue of last week the 
Aurora Banner reported a dis- 
cussion at the Aurora Lions club 
in which an Aurora News Page 
editorial was a principal subject 
of comment The editorial quot- 
ed the remark of a well-known 
Aurora lady to the effect that if 
the club re-named the Mechan- 
ics' hall the "Lions Den" it 
would sound like the name of a 
"cocktail bar." The editorial 
paid tribute to the work of the 
club. 

The Aurora Banner reported 
Mr. Glass as saying that "it's an 
utter disgrace that any editor 
would associate the phrase, 
•cocktail bar' with this hall." 

After we had been approached 
by a member of the Lions club, 
who said he had not forgotten 
the good publicity work we had 
formerly done for the Aurora 

Lions, and that he was disturbed 

by the report and the words 
which he did not think Doni 



Glass had used, we called Mr. 
Glass personally. 
Mr. Glass said that while he 



NOMINATION NIGHT 

Continued from page 9 

basted us. He was so bitter that 
the words were sour as 'they 
came over the air. He was down 
from the fence for once in bis 
life. He grilled us as he for- 
merly grilled Assessor E. It, 
Good, who had dared to raise 
his assessments. "Such childish 
writing," hissed the kindly 
reeve. 

Better Go To Bed! 

We wish he had gone on and 
on. He wasn't hurting us. We 
could take it. ' Reeve Cook 
couldn't. He squirms under criti- 
cism. "Public men who can't 
take criticism should go to bed 
and stay there," said Winston 
Churchill. So Reeve Cook had 
better go to bed. "When criti- 
cism ends, freedom dies," said 



thought that poor judgment had Mr. John G. Diefonbaker. Mr. 
been used in using the words Cook should ponder those two 

adages. 

If Reeve Cook could be as sure 
on council matters as he was 
sure that people shouldn't read 
our paper, he might get some- 
where. The people in Aurora 
think differently however. They 

know that in our newspaper 
they will get the council facts. 



"cocktail bar" as a headline, he 
liked what we had written in 
tribute to the work of the Lions, 
and added that he had not used 
the foregoing words in the con- 
nection reported by the Banner. 
He also stated that a speech he 
had made at the recent dinner 

of the Recreation Commission, 
of which he is the chairman, was 
also incorrectly reported by the 
Banner. 

Mr. Glass stated that he had 
pointed out the latter erroneous 
report to the Banner, and a 
promise had been made that it 
would be corrected. No such 
correction, however, had so far 
appeared. 

It is due to Mr. Glass, and to 
Aurora News Page, that his dis- 
claimer should be made public. 



We have not pandered to 
Cook. We have expressed the 
opinion that he is of no use to 

Aurora as a member of council. 

We repeat that opinion. His 
harangue on Friday night prov- 
ed it. 

It was the Reeve of the town 
who was blasting us. He could- 
n't take it. So he tried hard tc 
smear our' "childish writings." 
The result was that by Saturday 
evening there were not a dozen 
copies of our newspaper on the 
new-stands in Aurora. There 
were only little heaps of Ban- 
ners. Thank you, Reeve Cook, 
for your excellent publicity 
work on our behalf. 

"Such childish writings." For 
Reeve Cook's advance informa- 
tion, we hear that the Dr. Mal- 
colm Court of Revision is at 
present in session, hearing as* 

sessment appeals in Squirrel 
Town. If any one of the appel- 
lants obtains a reduction of 10,- 

000 nuts it will doubtless be 
reported to Capt. Eavesdropper's 
paper, "The Searchlight." 

Meanwhile, we thank Reeve 
Cook for his gracious speech, 
given in such a gracious man- 
ner, in the Mechanics' hall on 

Friday night, November 30. 



* t 




T© the EtectOK 



■ 






I am a candidate for election 
Council on December 10, and res 

support * ■" /-^fgissi 



If elected I shall do whatever I can to 
town expenditures wherever possible and to serve 

fellow-citizens 




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Kennedy St Sewer Report 
Subject Of Telephone Call 



On Monday morning, Decem- 
ber 3, Councillor Fielding called 
Aurora News Page to complain 
of the wording of the first para- 
graph in our column, of last 
week entitled "Council High- 
lights." In our issue of Novem- 
ber 22 we reported a motion 
moved by Councillor Gundy, 
seconded by Councillor Fielding, 
that a sanitary sewer be put in 

on Kennedy street west, as pe- 
titioned for, at cost to property 

owners under local improve- 
ment act. 

That was correct. However, in 
the above-mentioned column of 
November 29 it was stated that 
"by a majority vote council pass- 
ed a motion in their favor, 
namely, the Kennedy street peti- 
tioners." This inadvertance was 
the subject of Councillor Field- 
ing's telephone call to Aurora 
News Page, and we immediately 
stated that we would correct the 
matter to Councillor Fielding's 
own wording as follows; "The 
Kennedy street people will get 
their sewers in on exactly the 
same basis as everyone else in 
Aurora." 

Councillor Fielding told us 
quite bluntly that unless the 
correction were made that she 
intended to make an issue of it 
at the council meeting that 
evening. We replied that we 
were only too ready to make any 
necessary correction at any time, 
and that we would certainly put 
her statement into this week's 
issue of Aurora News Page. 
Councillor Fielding thanked us 
and said she was perfectly satis- 
fied. 

We did, in fact, make a fur- 
ther telephone call to Council- 
lor Fielding at her home on 
Monday afternoon to state that 
we had checked on our report 
in our issue of November 22, 
and the report was correct, and 
Councillor Fielding acknowledg- 
ed that was correct, and added 
that the acknowledgment we 
had promised in this week's is- 
sue would close the matter and 
that she accepted our assur- 
ances. 



Mountain Out Of Molehill 

At Monday night's meeting of 
council, Councillor Fielding, in 

defiance of her previously-ex- 
pressed statement that she was 

satisfied with our assurances, 
rose to complain of the inad- 
vertance we have mentioned. 
She admitted that the Aurora 
News Page had promised to pub^ 
lish what she had requested, but 
added that she felt it was some- 
thing that ought to be brought 
to council. 

Councillor Davies followed 
and requested that the editor be 
asked to retract. Mayor Bell 
then asked if the editor had any- 
thing to say. 

Replying, the editor of the Au- 
rora News Page said that on a 

previous , occasion when he de- 
sired to clear up a matter in 
dispute the mayor had refused 
his offer. Now he was being 
asked to do that very thing. He 
confirmed Councillor Fielding's 
telephone call and added that, 
as she had said she was satis- 
fied, he was surprised to find 
that she was now bringing the 
matter up again. 

He suggested that the matter 
had been brought up only for 
the purpose of giving some ad- 
verse publicity to the newspaper, 
and that a mountain was being 
made out of a molehill. He re- 
minded Councillor Davies that 
the other local newspaper made 
mistakes and hoped it would re- 
port that too, but whether the 
editor of the other paper, who 
had been taking notes, took a 
note of that he could not say. 




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VOU CANT MAT 



BUCKLEYS MIXTURE 









- 

Something important 

you should know sbout your husband 



You know him better than unyont «lia In the world. 
Vou know hit hid points ■• well as his goc J one*. 
lint one of his best points miy havt escaped 
your notice, 

You know that he doesn't do many of tl» 
things h©M like to do with his money — beceiusf 
Ihe family Income will only go so far. And you 
know that he might reasonably spend money; 
freely now — without 1 thought for your future^ 
But he doesn't. 



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»., Raving been returned ax yaur Council without e»pe>tl- 
tkm tor the y*ar IM$, we m members] ot Whlkharch 

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Regulwlyi ht putt aside money to tf 

you the protection of life Insurance. T*u»- 

he may gain benefit from that insurance durini 

hi. own life, hut thet Wt why he own. it 

The real season ^J«eund In |«1mM«^ 
for your walfs^^^W^^^ *^ '-&■: - • *» 

Do you;s^gpeta^ 

provide for you in 
Ara ' "' 

Right now, if * mate ii 
to save money. For every dollar put 
for the future fieti 



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TIMBERS 
MCCARRON 






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YOUR VOTE AND INFLUENCE 





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To the Sectors of Aurora 

AURORA HYDRO COMMISSION 

At the request of cltbeena, and because I am deeply 
Interested as a tax-paying cHben in the affairs of 

the town, I am offering my services as a Hydro 

Commissioner. 

... 

If elected for this office it will be my purpose 
to keep the citiiens Informed on every phase of its 
work. There appears to be an Idea held In some 
quarters that ihe Aurora hydro should be conducted 
as a private business. This Is wronf. The Aurora 
hydro is maintained by the taxpayers, and if elected 
I shall ask for the attendance of the press to report 
all meetings for the information of the taxpayers. 

With the financial and business experience I have 
nlned through my association with The Toronto Stock 
Exchange during the past twenty-four ytmijm 
confident I can be of service to my fellow-taxpayer* 
*■ a member of the Aurora Hydro Commission, and 



. 



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respectfully ask for your support on Monday, 
II. 



Yours very truly 

EVERETT' KERR 






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If the voters of Aurora elect iMf to «fflftcil#ff 
do everything possible to see that council carries out 
the wishes of the MAJORITY of the people. $1 



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r- ' Yours sincerely, 



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D. JAMES MURRAY I 



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Once again I *m *tttwlng><&/&ivtim-.-io 

citizens oi Aurora, and respectfully ask your su 
in electing me to council 

During theltve years 1 have served you I have 

tried at all times to promote the best Interestst^ofjA^ 

town as a whole. 
- I am strongly opposed to any more money 

8 p**t on the tannins bo.r* ai^KifflKC:" -. ... 

passing Into law of the toning by-law now be* 
the council, 

"-" I shall, if elected, stand for the anthoritfT 
town council, which Is elected by the 

le. 

,it}«ouid ^msmmmm^^mfmM 

and especially to have more informatk 

public on the town hydro. I am also 
meters. 



for the 



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ELEHORS OF AURORA 



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Your Vote and Influcnco 

A»o 

Ros|>oetfully Solicited 

Voto 



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Aurora Council 

My Platform Is: 

1. Maintenance of the Planning Hoard na an advisory 
board resiwnsible to Council: 

2. Jmprovomont of streets, roatls and pavomonta. 
a. Careful aupervision of town finnncoH, 



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Yotir very truly 



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10RNE P. EVANS 



DEPUTY 





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•^ 







The Story Of SHARON 



By 



Office and Residence 

150 



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NEWMAKKET 



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iiV.y^-:tf^L,-i»->-r" 



Evenings By Appointment 




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a ^Barrister, Solicitor 
Notary Public, Etc. 

Sji> . PHONE 151 

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MATHEWS. STIVER 

*«$&» 

Notaries 

& &. Mathews, K.C, 
K. M. R. Stiver, B.A. 
■ ' B. E. Lyons, B.A. 

Joseph Vale 
^hewmabkbt office 

[1*. MAIN 8T. 






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A. -A. MILLS 

Barrister, SolleKor and 
Notary Pablic 
51 MAIN ST. 

Phone «1 



wiixson 

This is the twenty-sixth instalment of a continuing 
"Story of Sharon" from its founding to the present. The 
story was written after almost two years of research 
and will, we believe, be a major contribution to know- 
ledge of the past. The remaining instalments will 
follow weekly. 



■ 






MISCELLANEOUS 



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JT. A. WILLOUGHBY * SONS 

Retl Estate 

364 Bay St Toronto 1 

LOCAL REPRESENTATIVE 

RUSSELL GLIDE * 

R. R. 2, Aurora Phone King 59r4 

(On Yonge St, 

North End Oak Ridges) 



VIOLET 
JtOWNSON MacNAUSHTON 



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NOTMY WIUC 

Conveyancing - - Insurance 
Mrford St. . TbDut 



139 



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BARRISTER, SOLICITOR, ETC. 

35 MAIN ST., 

PHONE 804. NEWMARKET 



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DR. W. O. NOBLE 

DENTIST 



A. E. HAWKINS 

Contractor For 
BULLDOZING, GRADING 
CELLAR EXCAVATIONS 

and 
Kaolin* Gravel, Sand and Fill 

Phone 219w, Aurora 

* 

STOUFFVItLE SAND 
and GRAVEL LTD. 

for government approved 
crashed stone of various sixes 

crashed travel, sand 
concrete gravel and pit ma. 

Delivered or at bin, 

■ * 

Plant phone 125 
Office phones 370 and 126 



ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

House and Farm Wiring 

D O V G BAIN 

General Repairs 

Tfankeo Oil Burners 

Faweett Space Heater 

All Electrical Household 

Appliances 

Phone 422 Box 717 

t6 Ontario St W.» Newmarket 



STEWART BEARE 



• -■ 










Om MUNICIPAL OFFICE 

Office 47 



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m\ 



Residence 1344 



V4«c-^^ 



I Pt. & B. VanderVoort 

" gj ; DENTIST 

Main St. Newmarket 

Phono 464w 



RADIO PARTS, TUBES 

. * _ BATTERIES, ETC. 
US Main St Plume 3SS 



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^^BOYD,M.a 

Phaoe ME. 9559 



4. STOUFFER 

■ _ 19 Raglan St.' 

Expert Piano Toner and 
Repairer 

Pianos Bought, Sold and Rented 
PHONE 270 




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MfciO. MEBVVN PEEVEB 



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Physician and Surgeon 

_ JoitSy Appointment 

^^•esldence corner of 



and Tecumaeh St«, 



^.imttiMBINSTAUi ' 
rhjsldaa and Sur C eon 
MARGARET ARK1NBTALL 
^^^ PhyikUn 

Office: 121 Prospect St 
rtkn by Appointment 

TELEPHONE: Office 915 

Residence 1240J 



PLUMBING, HEATING 
CONTRACTOR 

Dealer for 

Iieleo Water Pressure Systems 
- Arcoflame Oil Burners 
Cement Septic Tanks 
Constructed 

OAK RIDGES 

Phono King 111 

Phono Aurora 40J 



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OSTEOPATHY 



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. .JWIMON 

OHmfihk and ArUriUa 



Clink 



ON BUILD1NO, BARBIE 

bmOfr&Ai 2293 




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. D.O. 

eorATtuo PIIVHICIAN 



EVANS' FUBi 

newmarket 

Coal, Coke. Wood 
and Stoker Coal 

PnOfK 5 

Orders token for Gravel. Sand 

end Crushed Stono 

and General Hauling 



Hie Uprising 

Further from this history the 
author relates that "the two men 
who died from their wounds 
were James Kavanagh and Ed- 
gar Stiles, both from the town- 
ship of East Gwillimbury. Kav- 
anagh's son, John, later became 
postmaster at Sharon. These 
men were conveyed to Mont- 
gomery's and later to hospital 

where they died. George Flet- 
cher, a nephew of Silas', was 

shot in the left foot The bullet 
was finally cut out by Judah 

Lundy who still resides in 
Sharon." 

York was in a state of great 
excitement. Prisoners from 
North York were kept for three 
weeks in the market building: 
Meanwhile the trials continued. 
North Yorkers later were trans- 
ferred to the gaol, 53 persons 
obliged to occupy one small 
room. 

William Reid with John Mont- 
gomery, were the first to kick 
the boards from the windows in 
protest of the unsanitary condi- 
tions. John Reid developed 
smallpox and was removed to 
hospital. Wiilson Reid was 
transferred to Kingston but es- 
caped. Jacob Lundy took part 
in the skirmish on Yonge Street, 
also in the bush fight on Decem- 
ber 10. He was taken prisoner 
at Callow's Hill ambush, but was 
reprieved by the Lieutenant 
Governor, in hope that he would 
turn state witness. Alexander 
McLeod was sentenced to ban- 
ishment for life to Van Dieman's 
Land, but died enroute. Joseph 
Brommcr was the only prisoner 
to bring away from the gaol the 
document, Bill of Indictment. 

When the grand jury brought 
in a true bill against him he 
said: "Your Lordship, I am an 
Englishman. I have n heart as 
true and loyal to the Queen and 
to Britain as any British sub- 
ject in the country, but if you 
mean disloyal to the Family 
Compact and the men who arc 
robbing the country, I am guil- 
ty!" He was never tried. 

Those from Sharon who ac- 
tively opposed the Compact, in 
so far as found, are: John Reid, 
William Reid, Wiilson Reid, Al- 
exander Reid, Joseph Brommcr, 
John Brammcr. Ebcnezer Doan, 
Charles Doan, Jesse Doan, Jona- 
than Doan, Hugh D. Wiilson, 
John D. Wiilson, David Wiilson, 
John Graham, Jeremiah Gra- 
ham, William Graham, Adam 
Graham, Judah Lundy, Jacob 
Lundy, Reuben Lundy, Edgar 
Stiles, John Kavanagh, George 
Fletcher, Alexander McLeod, 
Joel Lloyd, Peter Ho wen, Rich- 
ard Graham, Robert Moore, 
George Y. Moore; these two lat- 
ter were from Queensvillc. 
The Charges 

The weary hours in gaol were 
frequently shortened by the 
music of Joseph Hrammcr's 
clarionet and Hugh D. Wilson's 
violin, both members of the 
Sharon band. The charges for 
which they wore arrested were: 
"Being moved and seduced by 
the Instigation of the devil ns 
false traitors against our Sov- 
ereign Lady, the Queen, did 
unlawfully, maliciously and 
traitorously assemble to the 
number of 500 persons, armed 



and arrayed in a war-like man- 
ner, attempt, and endeavor, by 
force of arms, to raise insurrec- 
tion and rebellion to subvert 
and destroy the Constitution of 
this Province, contrary to the 
duty of their allegiance and 
against the peace of our Lady, 
the Queen, her Crown and Dig- 
nity." 

Canadian Militia 

The Canadian militia from 
this upper part of the county, 
which made a gesture to assist 

the government, knew no more 

about military manoeuvres than 
those angry, frustrated, desper- 
ate and determined fanners and 
mechanics from East Gwillinv 
bury. A description of them has 
been gleaned as they gathered 
at Bradford where not one third 



JACK SMITH WRITES 

Ottawa Letter 

A weekly letter from the member of parliament 

for York North. 

. I refrained from sending my Ottawa letter in 
recent weeks for two reasons* I appreciate that dur- 
ing a provincial election weekly newspaper, publishers 
are hard pressed for valuable space, and 1 did not want 
to presume on the good nature of my fellow-publishers 
who are good enough to give regular space to these 
weekly reports. 



Secondly, a provincial election 
was being fought and I had no 
desire in any way to be open to 
the charge that these reports are 
in any way political. I have en- 
deavored to make my weekly 
letters informative rather than 
political and this will continue to 
be my policy. 

However, the election riow is 

over and I think we all should 
heed the words of Premier Frost 
who said the duty of all now is 
to unite and work for the good 
of Ore province and Canada. 

The people of Ontario have 
elected a government and your 



of them had afms; and "those government here at Ottawa ac- 

'cepts that verdict and will gladly 



JOHN DAL* 

Expert W«t«h tad Clock Repair 
31 Gorhnrn St. . 
or •• 
Phone 8B6M Newmarket 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



It : 



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D'ARCY MILLER 

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Phone 



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CHlMaVSTS 
BUILT 



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k RVFAUUD 



Phone 2M1 ■ Sutton 



that were armed had nothing but 
pitchforks, rusty swords, dilapi- 
dated guns, pikes with an occa- 
sional bayonet on the end of a 
pole ..." 

These persons, without the 
least authority of law, set about 
a disarming process. "When 
they began their march down 
Yonge St. they included about 
150 Indians with painted faces 
and savage looks. These gro- 
tesque-looking militiamen made 
prisoner every man who could 
not give an account of himself, 
and when they nlarched into 
York they were about as motley 
a collection as it would be pos- 
sible to conceive." 
Radical Plans 

Titus Wiilson, of early Sharon, 
relates in a manuscript recently 
published that "In the fall of 
1837 the political horizon looked 
rather squally. The Rads were 
holding frequent meeting in dif- 
ferent parts of the country — that 
is the disaffected part of them 
and that was by for the largest 
part of York County. 

"On December 7, 1837, as I 
was going up Queen Street to- 
wards Queensvillc, I met first 
five or six men with rifles whom 
I knew to be fond of deer hunt- 
ing, etc. ... I proceeded about 
a half mile farther when I met 
60 or 70 struggling along. Some 
had guns, some swords and 
others unarmed. There were 
also several teams and wagons, 
loaded but covered. I began to 
suspect their object, and ques- 
tioned some that I knew, but 
could get no satisfaction. I met 

Edgar Stiles opposite his father's 
house and followed him hi, 

where his father gave him a pair 

of boots and some money. 

"On my way south I went into 
the tavern of Hiram Moore's on 
Tory Hill, and asked the land- 
lady if she understood the move- 
ment. She replied, 'Yes, they 
are going to take Toronto. 1 
knew it several days since.' 1 
asked, 'Why did you not tell 
me?' 'I was told not to do so/ 
was the reply. 
News To Newmarket 

"When she told me that, I im- 
mediately went across to the 
landing, and on my way met 
Sam Swensy, whom I asked if 
he understood the movement. 
He replied, 'Yes, they ore going 
to take Toronto, rob the bank, 
hang the Governor and when 
they come back they will hang 
you!' I then went on to the 
Landing, and saw Captain 
I«aughton and the Plnyters, my 
brother Alfred and two or .three 
others who had heard something 
About the stir but not the par- 
ticulars. Someone went to Brad- 
ford to spread the news and I 
went to Newmarket. 

"From Newmarket I went 
homo by way of the Selby's, 
and found William and John 
ready to do nil they could. My 
una. David, was a sorgoant and 
I sent him to warn thaw still 
nt home to turn out. I also went 
mysolf to a number, but could 
find nono but James Evans. I 
was then n lieutenant and my 
brother, John, a captain in Kast 
Owlllimbury. My son, David, 
went to lllrchnrdtown (Mount 
Alhort) settlement to warn men 
to turn out in defcuco of the 
governments 
Mutual Defence 

In a lengthy description of 
thoso troubled tlmea In Sharon, 
Titus Wiilson relates that arms 
wero scarce— -cither in tho hands 
of tho rebels or hidden so that 
tho government could not find 
them. Thoso from tho Landing 
rind Bradford Joined thoso from 
Nowmnrket at McLeod'* Inn 
(they took this over) near Au- 
rora. Some in or 20 about tho 
Landing and Sharon joined and 
formed a company for mutual 
defence. Continuing, ho soya; °I 
was scut with despatches to 
Colonel Cnrthow nt Nowmnrket, 
nnd that night I went with n 
strong party to Shnrnn, whore 
wo captured aomo HO or 4(1 of 
thoso who woro implicated in 
tho Rebellion and sent thorn to 
Toronto. For three or four days 
I was nt Newmarket attending 
to tho guards, as wo had a num- 
ber of prisoners in tho Baptist 
Mooting Houho. 

• "I was next ordered to go to 
whom Colllngwood now Rtnnd* 
to look for taunt, who was said 
to bo there at a lonely hoiuo 
of one John Brainier, Mr« El! 

Boaman wan to go with me. Wo 
started and got nf far at Brad- 
ford whon a man wm aent «t<- 
I ttr us with the report that Lount 



work with your elected represen- 
tatives in any matters pertaining 
to the province and Dominion. 

Here in North York> I extend 
congratulations to the elected 
representative Major Lex Mack- 
enzie. In all matters pertaining 
to the good and welfare of North 
York I will be most happy to co- 
operate with him to the fullest 
extent in the future as I have in 
the past. 

Old Age Pensions 

I receive many representations 
and complaints about the diffi- 
culties of applicants for pension 
in providing proof of age. 

In Individual cases this con- 
cern is understandable, but I 
wish to assure everyone that 
every assistance will be given to 
those who do not hove birth cer- 
tificates or other proof of birth. 

I know you will appreciate the 
position of the government 
charged with the responsibility of 
administering the Act. The gov- 
ernment wants the new Act ad- 
ministered humanely, but it must 
insist too that it be efficiently ad- 
ministered. 

Every precaution must be tak- 
en against fraud and 1 learned 
from the department of health 
and welfare that already many 
hundred cases of attempted fraud 
have been discovered. 

The government must insist on 
proof of age. Every help will 
be given by myself and the de- 
partment to those who may ex- 
perience difficulty, and in time 
I am sure all cases can be solved 
satisfactorily. Every facility in- 
cluding our census records ; will 
be made available. 

I am happy to report that al- 
ready applications of 70ft of 
eligible recipients have been ap- 
proved, and I om confident that 



had been taken." 
William Selby 

Mrs. Mary Selby Kneeshhw 
of Bradford lias contributed 
some interesting Items of the 
part played by tho Selby'a in 
those days of anxiety. "William 
Selby was a colonel in the Boyal 
forces during the Rebellion of 
1837, He had to collect all tho 
firearms of the rebels in tho 
neighborhood. Onco whon the 
rebels come to his house where 
ho had some ammunition and 
guns stored, ho was all nlono 
with some of the family and a 
young hoy. He hailed tho rebels 
and said! *I have a gun to match 
every one of yours and hands to 
firo them. 1 Tho rebels retreat- 
ed aftop a few shots. With tho 
aid or tho boy ho loaded the 
guns and ammunition on to a 
wagon nnd drove all night to 
tho garrison nt Muddy York. 
It is this William Sclby's por- 
trait which hangs in tho 
Temple." 

In so far ns can be found tho 
names of those from East Gwil- 
limhury who wero on tho Gov- 
ernment side wero: Henry Pry, 
William and John Selby, David 
T. Wiilson. George Sutlingor, 
Titus Wiilson. They wero bad- 
ly armort with a few guns, a 
walking stick, an umbrella, a 
butcher's clenvor, a bill hook 
and a tremendous butchor knifo. 

No Memorial 

Washed by toko Ontario on 
tho soulh end by Lake Slmeoo 
on tho north, ties the fruitful 
land which could rightly bo call- 
ed tho Runnymedo of Canada, 
and tho extraordinary township 
of East awillirnbury is rich In 
unique historic ovloonio of tho 
birth of Canada's Magna Charla, 
that fundumentnl constitution 
which guarantees tho rights and 
privileges of tho present day; 
yot no tangible memorial exists 
around Sharon or Holland Land- 
ing to those rutfited -souls, pa- 
triot or rebeli who woro largely 
Iho menus of bringing it about, 
still oxtnnt in a letter wrltton at 
Hopo, Jan. 20, IU30, by Samuel 
Hughes to his sinter: ". , , Tho 
political state «f the country 
sooms very unoortaln, and no 
one knows how to roall/.o the 
worth of oithor his libortv or 
properly, , , „ a commlsKlonor 
from Lord Durham was In our 
vllla«o last night and uponks of 
a uncedy settlement of the mat- 
ter, 1 ' 

An American tourist, visiting 
York County In IfWO, returned 
seme portlnont remarks on the 
Indifference deployed by Cana- 
dians to the magnificent heri- 
t«fr which Is part and parcel 
of the community. 



by year's end, 05% of the appli- 
cations will have been approved. 

This is a very creditable rec- 
ord for. the department of nation- 
al health and welfare which ac- 
complished this very sizable task 

with an addition of only 100 per- 
sons to the staff all across Can- 
ada. 

To appreciate the size of the 
department's task it must be re- 
membered that it is estimated the 
old age assistance and universal 
pensions will benefit more than 
800,000 Canadians next year. 
Veterans* Pensions 

An important item of business 
at this session concerns pensions 
for war veterans. For a long 
time it has been felt that due to 
the increase in the cost of living 
over the years there should be 
an increase in the basic rate of 
pension. 

The government was pleased to 
receive representation from Can- 
adian Legion and from veterans 
in all parts of Canada and after 
careful consideration decided on 
one-third increase in basic pen- 
sion rates. This means that a 
pensioner who is totally disabled 
as a result of his war service, re- 
ceived n 100 percent pension, 
which at the present is $04 
monthly. This will be increased 
to $125 which represents a 33 1/3 
percent increase. 

From correspondence I have 
received, I om pleased to con- 
clude that this action by your 
government, which received sup- 
port from all parties in the 
House, has met with the approv- 
al of veterans, and the people 
of Canada generally who want 
to sec them get nothing short 
of a square deal, 

The increase in the basic rates 
will be effective on January 1, 
1952. 
Governor General 

There is quite n general feel- 
ing that the reason for the exten- 
sion of the term of Governor- 
General Viscount Alexander is 
the desire of tho government to 
have a Canadian appointed to 
this post. 

Those who take this view over- 
look tho fact that the present 
Governor-General has proven « 
most popular King's representa- 
tive and that there Is n very 
unanimous wish here to keep him 
in Canada as long as possible. 

In regard to a choice of u suc- 
cessor there certainly Is a large 
element of public support tor 
the appointment of a Canadian. 
On the other hand many feel the 
high office would lose something 
of Its colo r and significance 
should a Canadian bo appointed. 
- Certainly no decision has been 
made on the subject and opinions 
expressed arc pure speculation. 
Canadians may rest assured the 
matter will bo given tho most 
careful attention and considera- 
tion by tho government. 1 have 
received many expressions of 
opinions from North York people 
on tho subject and would bo 
happy to hear from others. 



Sanitary Contractor 



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Drains Cleaned ind Repaired 

24-Hodt Service 



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Xt*s one of todsy*s 
best buys — grow- 
ing in value «U the 
time. 

For one thing — its 
cost ht«n*t gone up as . 

much as meat other things you buy* Your telephone Is one Hem. 
take. te» ofyoor bu^tthin ft ^ £ g^gl 

Again — it's bigger value thsn ever because now you can 
twice ss many people as you could ten years ago — and mere 
are getting telephones etery dsjr. ^ ^, 

In addition — we've been ablo to keep on steadily 



t«d and your telephone will be installed Just as quickly as pottlbl 



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We were the guest on Friday 
night of the Newmarket Rod 
and Gun club at the club's an- 
nual banquet, and a thorough- 
ly enjoyable time we had. The 
banquet hall at the King 
George Hotel was filled with 
the club members and their 
wives and guests. We had a 
turkey dinner and it was 
lovely. 

It was an informal gathering 
with the talk on lish'lng and 
hunting echoing the length of 
the tables. Albert Higginson is 
president of the club and acted 
as master of ceremonies in the 
brief program which followed 
the clearing of the dishes. 

One highlight was the pres- 
entation of a bowl of fruit to 
Mrs- Bert Morrison who had 
been hostess to the club mem- 
bers at the Morrison cottage on 
the Jersey last summer. **A 
small token of our appreciation 
for the manner in which you 
looked after us," said Mr. Hig- 
ginson. 

He. was somewhat bowled 
over when a few minutes later, 
Beit Morrison, rising to thank 
the club for its gift to his wife, 
made in turn a presentation to 
Mr. Higginson of a framed 
painting of the Jersey with the 
verse. Just Fisliin', printed be- 
side it. 

. With the picture went a 
colorful sports shirt so that Al- 
bert could be identified out on 

the water. 

* ♦ • 

The address by S- A. Barnes 
of the conservation branch of 
the department of planning 
and development was short and 
lo the point He described how 
conservation' authorities are es- 
tablished and what is expected 
of them. 

"Water is Vie most important 
of all our resources," he said, 
"Each adult uses about a half 
gallon a day and the per capita 
use of water in Ontario runs 
about a thousand gallons a per- 
son a day." 

Mr. Barnes is a tall, engaging 
sort of speaker and he led off 
with a speaker's joke, different 
from the usual approach be- 
cause it evoked a roar of appre- 
ciative Jaughter. It concerned 
a duck which v/as decoyed 
down on the water and as it 
swam tov/ards the decoy, it 
saw the barrels of a shotgun 
protruding from the blind. 
Straightway, it went under the 
water as the gun roared. When 
it came up, the air was full of 
splinters from the decoy. 
"Aha," says the duck, " wooden 
duck, eh?" 



The conservation officers 
from the department of lands 
and forests showed several 
wild-life films to bring the 
evening to a close. 

We sat beside Bi.l Denne, 
lately home from Korea, at an 
Optimist club banquet Tuesday 
night. Bill spoke to the club 
members and their guests, the 
baseball team which reached 
the Ontario finals this year. 

Ife told something of his ex- 
periences in Korea and an- 
swered a number of questions 
from the floor. We were par- 
ticularly impressed by his esti- 
mation of the Chinese soldier. 
"One of the very best. He's 
not so good close in but he's 

tops from a distance," he said. 
. • • • 

■ 

The life of an infant pig is 
Somewhat hazardous to say the 
least. He's got to fight for his 
place at the dinner table; he 
may be tramped or rolled upon 
by his mother. Some sows 
even eat their young so if a pig 
survives its first few days, it's 
as much a matter of luck as 
anything. 

This condition is, of course, 
a matter for concern among 
the hog producers but there 
hasn't been much they could do 
about it except to protect the 
young with barriers and so 
«««. The problem has occupied 
the attention of a firm in the 
States which believes it has 
solved it by providing a row 
of bottles with rubl>er nipples 
and filled with synthetic sow's 
milk spiked with the antibiotic, 
terramycin. 

Seems to be working out for 
the drug company although the 
U.S, department of agriculture 
■is somewhat sceptical. For one 
thing, pigs are sound sleepers 
and awakened only by the 
sound from the sow as she 
settles down to feed them. The 
drug people made recordings of 
this sound and then plaued it 
over a gramophone. This 
awakened most of the pigs and 
their squeals av/akened the 
others. 

The government doesn't 
think that in the doubtful ac- 
coustics of a barn that this 
7/ouId be too reliable. The de- 
partment fears too that taking 
the piglets av/ay from the sows 
would have a disturbing psy- 
chological effect upon both 
pigs and sows. 

Still and all, the method 
seems to have its points. Of 
3,000 pigs so raised, only five 
ftercent died compared to a 
normal mortality rate of 
around 20 to 30 percent. 




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Tfc.H«wm«k«tI=ralS52 Th» Express H.rold IBM 

Published me/ Thursday at 142 Mom St., Nrnwrnorket, by the Nevrmarket Era and Express limited. Subscription $4 for two years, 
$2.50 for om year, m advance. Single copies or* 5e ninth, Member of Cfaii 0, VfgmHims of Canada, Canadian Weekly Newspapers 
Association, and the Audit Sureou of Circulations. Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Department, Ottawa. 

JOHN >/L MIYIt . . Managing f ditet JOHN I, STRUTHERS . . N«ws Wifor 

CAROUNE ION . . . Woman's tdHar x> GlORGf HASKETT . . Sports Mfror 









\ 






LAWRE NCE RACINE . . Job Printing and Production 






■ 







HE fO/TO mm PAGE 



.- 7 



_^->, :V> — >. 



PAGE TWELVE 



- 

From the Files of 

* 

25 and 50 Years Ago 



.■ • ■ 



•'& 



a^PSqfe 



. DECEMBER 3, 1526 
Now then, get sezdy lor 
Christmas and the municipal 

elections. 

Toronto: An ocean vessel is 
unloading 3,000 tons oi sugar in 
the harbor this week. 

Leave your shadow &t Fergie's 
Studio next week if you want 
your photos to mail before 
Christmas. 

Although a very di^gr^e- 
abie evening, oyer Vi people 
turned out to the pie social 
held last Friday night oy the 
Arxnitage Community Club. 

Only three weeks til) 
Christmas, 

The post office inspector 
was litre the other <&&/ and 
to conserve the heat ordered 
that the north d/yjr m the post 
office he closed during tiifc 
winter uwrith*. So iont be 
fooled; use the two east d^orjs. 

Mr. Pollock sold a pair of 
fwes in Toronto one d&y last 
week. 

Sutton river bridge is com- 
ing along iitje &t±d we are ex- 
pecting to see it do/* by 

Christmas. 

Virginia: h large rrov/d 
attended church on Sunday 
when J6s'/. BeMty delivered a 

splendid sernv>n. V/e were 
glad to see some of the child- 
ren out ngbin, after haying 
chicjeenpox. 

QueensviJie: GI&4 to tee a 
stait on iise new sink. 

'Vlw al>sence of ejectric cur- 
rent last Saturday was due to 
a hfttk in the nwn line 
somewhere between nwe and 
% N }3ga ra Falls, owing, $J> 
||doubt, to the high wind and 



*V -■ 



{3&<h 7-3 



f>ECEMfi£R 6, 1301 

The boys and girls had a 
great time skating on Fairy 
Lake on Thanksgiving Day. 
The ice is sly. inches thick. 

A \jjrvion cablegram states 
that the provisional date for 
Xne coronation of King Edward 
ViJ and Queen Alexandra is 
June 25, W2. 

Two wessVs from Wednesday 
will be Christmas — that grand 
old <Jsy that comes hut once 
a year, and our merchants are 
hopeluj of a g<sA holiday tra4e 
— a hope that we trust will not 
be disappoiiited. 

Baldwin : O r andpap Russei 
Morton went to Muskoka in the 
hunting season. Jfas not yet 
returned. Perhaps y/iJI winter 
there. 

Baldwin: Several silver jgray 
£ox,es have been zven in this 
section- t/Lo*>\ probably the 
same one several times: Tlieir 
fur ic valuable. 

We notice t)j*t Kt?mnhr)u& 
ijoys, returning /;om scliooi on 
brigiit warn* d&ys wiie« f}& 

tnow pat.rks nicely, very trp- 
4juc-nUy indulge in UJs f/tfs? 

chievous prax-tiee, tiiereby vio- 
lating a Uf'/w hy-\+w, Hviwitf 
teat-JurJ^ liSbd Letter sound a 

note of v/ar/;ing. 

firsdfwti: ijvrgc-ss' heeiylena 
Gas V/orks heie v/ere partly 4e» 
si/oyed by Ute on the aflei- 
rwm */( Thanksgiving D&y. 

Qyjte/isvjlle; Several tenders 
are in for tJie rink i>ut no de- 
cision has been ai lived at yet. 

QueensvijJe: 14/., Henry Tra- 
yi.-o i;ad the niisfoitunc hi jn- 
jure his driving marc on Sun- 
day last. She is unable to' do 



STANIiV 




THURSDAY, THE SIXTH DAY OF DECEMBER. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FIFTY-ONE 

percent during the same period. 



_i , * « . - 



' ' 






SHOULD CONTEST 
TOP THREE COUNCIL OFFICES 

* ■ 

It is a matter for regret that the mayor, reeve and 
deputy were acclaimed again this year in Newmarket. 
We believe the three men will agree that it would have 
been a more healthy indication of public interest had 
they been challenged by other candidates. 

.We say this, not in any particular criticism of 
their terms of office, but in the interest of maintain- 
ing a lively concern for public affairs. The three 
were acclaimed last year. The reeve and mayor have 
been acclaimed before that. This habitual affirmation 
in office is not sound practice. 

There were four npv contenders for council seats. 
We wonder why there were no contenders for the top 
three offices. Acclamation suggests unanimous approv- 
al. From what we have heard on Main St., there is 
far from unanimous approval of the policies of these 
three. Why, then, do not those who disapprove chal- 
lenge these men at nomination? 

We wonder too why some of the older councillors 
have not attempted to move up by seeking one of the 
three offices. . That would be the logical step. In 
Newmarket council, however, promotion from council- 
lor to higher office has more frequently followed the 
retirement of one of the top men rather than as a result 
of a challenge from the ranks. 

Acclamation is most frequently accepted as a vote 
of confidence, but when acclamation becomes habitual; 
it is only an indication of public apathy. We feel it is 
unfair to the men involved as well as revealing a weak- 
ness in our interest in public affairs. 



LESSON FROM THE POLL 

The heavy vote polled by Mr. Charles Boyd in his 
first try for council, and that polled by Mrs. Violet 
Robinson MacNaughton in her second try seem to us 
an indication that the citizens definitely want fresh 
blood in council. The fact that Mr. Boyd polled a record 
vote to lead the polls and that Mrs. MacNaughton, who 
ran second, v/as well ahead of the next council can- 
didate emphasize this conclusion. 

We contended last week that last year's council 
had been adequate to the tasks it had undertaken, and 
they were many, but it offered no more than this. The 
vote seems to bear this out. The citizens have a right 
t/> expect more than simply administrative ability and 
they didn't get it from last year's council. There was 
little or nothing that suggested the kind of imaginative* 
leadership the towji requires. 

It is interesting too to note that white the two 
new council mcmhQT& replaced two councillors of long 
experience and with reputations for hard work, there 
}& nothing to indicate that tho voters were specially 
censuring tltem. TJie voto showed a definite prefer- 
«nce for the liewcomers but it did not show any pa*v 
licM'ar rej^lim of &££«!?• pOHHHSP find BirrcIL They 
were titnply; mu&Witi out In Mm* general voto. 

V/e hope the new council will accopfc MM* jwitfiwmt 
awl #yofce mm of thftir "time to B10 'cnn«id«sratioii of 
Ht-wmnrWiVh future and less of their time lo detail 
v/Jjich can be taken care of by town employees. Niw* 
p&M;'^ a town engineer, and 

tov/n employam to look after details. The coiiotiira 
purpose i» to caiaMfeh policy and K*V« leadership, 

J'ossibly, then,' was no choice for hist year's* r:oum:il 
%fflW it was confronted with numerous tasks which 
rightly should have been .spread over Um years. But 
wtodher this is true, it does remain a fact that the 
council contributed vary little that showed bold iimi 
Imaginative leadership, and Newmarket must have that 
leadership if it is to prosper. 

REASON FOR MILK INCREASES 

Milk producers in this district have been vainly 
seeking an increase in the price paid I hem by the dis- 
tributors for the past six months. They have been 
strongly opposed politically and by consumer groups 
because the price they ask would increase the cost of 
milk to the consumer by one cent. 

In the dispute which has flared through the sum* 
mer months and into the fall, a good deal of misleading 
and mistaken statements have been made on behalf of 
those opposing the increase. We quote here a few 

facts which show the increase would be justified* 

From the producers' point of view, the increase 
is required to pay increased costs of production. Farm 
labor costs have increased 181 percent in the ten years 
since 1941. Feed costs have increased 82 percent. 
Prices to the milk producers have increased only 72 



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k m# I** HmtMmm m§ nm stof* fo 







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atmps By Ginger 






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From the consumers* point of view, a cent a quart 

increase in milk is by no means high when taken in .■ 
relation with other food costs. Milk was a little higher 
than an average of all foods, and not quite as costly 
as meats and eggs in 1941. In 1951, milk prices on 
the cost of living index are 213.4 while all foods average 
at 251.5 and meats and eggs average at 354.9. 

Or to put it another way, in 1939, the average 
man worked 15.6 minutes to buy a quart of milk and 
in 1951, he worked 10.1 minutes. 

Milk prices must be considered too in relation to 
the national agricultural economy. Because of poor 
milk prices, producers have been selling their herds. 
The cow population in Canada has decreased by 2.4 
percent and the human population has increased by 
21.6 percent. In 1941 the per capita consumption of 
milk was 1,438 lbs. In 1951, it is 1,171 lbs. if the 
cow population continues to decrease while the human 
population continues to increase, there will be serious 
shortages of milk in Canada. That will mean that 
the cost of milk will soar far above what it is ever 
likely to be as long as Canadian dairy farmers are 
encouraged to maintain enough production for domes* 
tic use. 

In confirmation of the facts on milk production 
and prices quoted above, the minister for agriculture, 
lion. T. L. Kennedy, said this week that the producers 
should be receiving §5 a hundredweight for their milk 
and that milk should be selling at 24 cents a quart in 
Toronto. He was answering the protests of the mayors 
of Ontario centres who are protesting increases to the 
producers which will raise the price to the consumer 
21 and 22 cents. 

As welcome as the statement is to the producers 
who are sorely in need of such support, its publication 
now illustrates the difficulties under which producers 
must market their milk. Indeed, there is no pnxtuwr 
or manufacturer who must contend with so many frus- 
trations in selling his product as the milk producer. 
And when these frustrations include politics* it is too 

much to ask that the producers retain their patience. 

Tho producers have been negotiating for a new 
price for their milk for over six months. The issue is 
still unsettled m we write because of a series ol' ob- 
stacles, none of which had anything to do with the 
merila of their requirements, The producers feel that 

the price of milk should bo determined by cast at* pr*>- 
duction. lint into their bargaining was injected the 
politics of civic and provincial representatives, the 
pressure of organi/Aul labor, ami tho obstinacy of the 
dairies. 

ISvou thu council of Nownmvkot joined the giuue 
despite, tho fact that 4 tho members, admittedly, were not 
suro of tho merit a of tho producers' claims. The council 
passed a resolution against a further increase in the 
price of milk some days m-.o. 

Now, with the milk coutvol board about to announce 
n«w prices or confirm tho eUl, these frustrations are 
paid history but their effect remaius. For, should the 
javUucepi receive tho price they nsk, it will give t,Hem 
<ndy n smidl pemmlntfo of the benefit they originally 
sought. I>uring tho punt six months, fgsf of production 

bus eontimieii lo ipvftasei Wh»t the pvoilucevH wanted 
six mouths ago te uo Uuigot' mNunte, 

WW it nil «<Ui» m» ft U [\m w\\\\M* \\y&mwm u 
mtmt of 'pnultuwrd U\ i>«« of ('uwulw'a \*mW- U\tlH»tvit». 
'Hint tliHMiii-nprooHt: Is 'iwlmt shown nhowly in tho 
foihinj of iivoilwcors u> mninluin thoir lunds m a hnvl 
willi - |Mi|mliilioti increases. Kvontmiily tlmvo will dp 
a Mvlum s\wiaw «f »«Hk ami dairy inodwUs. Wluni 
this hapjiona, cost of Mioso ttnnhuHs will Imvo vlson so 
far lusyoiwl tholt* juosont lovol that what tho tonanmois 
auo nuvi'4 miff hy not |myin^ a fail* jn'U'o will aomunt 
l«> Iannis «ojnpiU(!<l to thwip fntni'u foot! hill. 



EDITORIAL NOTES 

A small hoy of ahont four.cHinhed on a chaii* at 
a Main Street soda fountain, but did not plaeo an <»rdor. 
"I'm jnat timl," ho saiil wearily, "I'm going to Imyo 
a rest. 

Student teachers fro m Toronto Normal 
are In tho district at present Tho city girls scream 
very much, it is said, when a mouse jumps out of the 
chalk box. 

The former Clerk's office, Main and Botsford, is 
now a musical centre, with the concert series campaign 
headquarters, and upstairs the band practising "Ru- 
dolph the Red-Nosed Reindeor'V 



U I think. it's t*me we started 
all over again," said Slim Blig- 
gens., tilting back his chair in 
front o£ the fireplace at his 
shack by the railway tracks. 

I put down my copy of that 
great Japanese work, Benjo No 
Kami, by the 19th century 
writer, Ikitai. and peered at my 
friend Bliggens over my bifo- 
?als. 

"Start what?" I asked. 

"Start a clean sheet — man 
that is. Civilization ought to 
* start all over again. . I've been 
readin* here about this here 
feller Cro-Magnon, that prehis- 
toric feller I was searching for 
in them French caves once. 
S/75 he v/as a tall, handsome 
type, with cranial volume fully 
equal to or greater than that 
of the average man of today. 

We might well wish that some 
of the blood of this magnificent 

race cursed through our veins. 
it says. Says their art was es- 
pecially noteworthy.*' 

"WeH, with a couple of atom 
wars and two or thr^s :ce ag£s, 
maybe well g*-t hack, to some- 
thing like him,** I sa&f. 

"Get back!" 1 crt~i Slim. -It'IL 
be an advancement, that's 



throw*/;,-. 



-■ ■ : 



exatnines the parts* 
them aside and scoffs. < >;'... 

He rants about the press. at»A '■; °. ; 
radio, goes into a ra^e about '": 
the stupid fools running wars .;: 
and killing each other. Event- 
ually he rumbles away, like ■.;• ';-.} 
thunder, into the kitchen and "v 
makes a pot of coffee a la Blig- 
gens ' .. * 

"A cranial volume equal to ; 
or greater than the average 
man of today," repeated Slim. \. "< 
"Why .if them Cro-Magnona 
had had half a chance, it there 
hadn't been another ice age, 
they would have been a thous- 
and years ahead with cranes 
like that". - . .- 

"Cranes? What are yoa ; 
talking abc«jt?" I pomfereo. 

^Eeads, ycu clout."' said : '"_' 
Snin. 

Oh. 



tf j 



• * 



y^s. n^-ans. I saiG. 



ovs 



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wnst. 

"No anirral. 
has ever directed his own e r "0- 
lUtionary course/* I said 

"Well whatever the curse, 
he's got it crerty bad," said 
Slim. 

-TI 



tcituurg man, 



what do you ihean, curs*E," 

1 said. - 

"That evolutionary c^me you 
is talliin' abouV said Slim. 

"Oh thaV I said- Sfim ?e?s 
sidetracked 3Q »3si!y. 

It wm Tuesday night, oat 
reading night. Some ceonie in 

handier aits, 

on 



iters ?iay :r.cs« 



It is most evepy Tuesday 
night tha" Slim delivers his e:i- 
hortatfon en man. He sees man 
so inzcerf'ict dissects him and. 



Man has hsd his s^'&t 

day of trrumph. 5>r^ hgjfi §o^ 
iii'4 m .-£111 Hisfcif o;z- Ts^s se 
? r:Il tre $b#$2&&& &y $£nz£ '--dats 
nxnnadn" stvu^ thlrzz "wrU 
dominate the Hzr*Jz„ I sell ysxt 
nif.'dfim tt.^h is Spain* *.-/ ?»* r^be 
'/""!f.*t:m ';t Irij vkti vr--ar33- 

stance, I mss&i .v»v^ri;.v;^. r 
It tt^s Ken ^-r^- :'vr >^ir.: -& 

of his Vf.fc* v^s ^r* t-irfiafflw 
hfgfesT- S5irr-3f« S£3s. 'TlStt 
huil dan? tE&jfSi&s ^ zS&t: .r*ndx- 
em. n:sis 'izbfx m& 2&sr srsse:. Sir 
Sas jnst «sa*i^& ar&sst i&%s&bb& 
. to asa|H »*5S\s*£ iressSc* ^wkks- 
pens ti-> hang. hi&iL Z« unt^- 
«0t th&i ?zzs? ?3va: : ?r -itv '5ndff, 
km QW3. fare,. 0$es£ : 
-~T~**2 $&&, shiu^ • ~,\& Cr,T- 
r.:. I nsr.d'. k "3ur ma^tiit- 
^3£ ^il csame inrf. nu- Srana 

Alt ^75 &S&£ -& 2hii\v is -MW& 



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"Ha amct nous- «aift tnusl* 
'*2^=Ie xusT* I .slid; 



- 



fcy "Dairy Farmer' 

The Top Six Inches 



-. 






The season is coming on ami 
VKSh i: all tSxat is fine and, •varm 
and cCvTiiorting ahout tiiis 
'-v<?rld of ours. And. also ail 
that :s silly xnd senseless* 

It isn't our incsntion t»? 
thunder av/iy as the wmnier- 
ciali-:ed a^peccs o£ ^ristmos or 
••^ 'A*r::e i sermon on some q£ 
the fa_aci^s corm^ct-c-c vixh it* 
But tjere :s one thing vhieo 
always stuck, in our cro? and 
we '-van: to tell you about :t. 

And ihsi is Christmas cards* 
Se^inahig Uajs tinne oi the y«ar 
gtns :s getting Christinas cords 
avnx relauves % from business 

assveiates, k&n far a^ray 
acquaintances Fjvin the iwd 
null and frcsn the hardware *u\d 
ivoni the o^Cv jxvp.e % >v^ haw 
co;uvectkvi;5 with. They ^u;e 
in an ever s\\eHin*5 *tr v \xn\ as?d 
overvvhehn us.- It S,iv<s the po$t 
oxf.e^ Sl territ?.e ume, wvrXiugi 
day and nigh* t<> ixy to sort 
tho:n. U is a (ever a:ui a tr.a:ua 

and a disease* U ss tx>n.}K>andt\V 
of gfcod wil3 t of ineney. anvi 
snobbery. 

I'hea vv^^e tho further *i!\* 
\.K\is 9i the case* U S& e^K 



1 

mas. One imp* s line tn :faese 
3e*ipie, oni$* Ltrt* usuailr' urinxfei; \ 
in&\ r^nr&sents =:un\titj^dj\ *=xe.i£ 
tiioughr. 

You will havs tio xAm\\ , : bit t tr*, 
ss=nd a zani: in this i*sirsie- mh-I. 
-\mifc Minnie ui. Sr^pusicasutj. i$^ 
a zinM gesture. It ^v^ans tistk; 
-.vs are Stinking a£ Iii^ at; thxh, 
tinve ans in our ni^iwdsa -vt* 
r>iAr=iI alt thfi :hin$s :h«t cu«i* 
nect :ht> afortsiiid -\unt :*irj3l^ : 
:o Christmas*. 

This :s n\2t :i^ same as send- 
ing a c<ird :u a :n*in viicm w** 
Si-e iu^ry day and -.vheev v^i can 
•A;iSii Chns*n\wS. :c anvuaw frnol; 
no.v untii I^*2in>£* ^t?. "Sue 
i& siiiy and^ insincere. To sen»i; 
a person a §te«tin§ :ar avvay i* 

a ^uer^us uKni To saiid a> 



- 



\ 






yecson a ss^vtirt^ cue -can 

sense* 

M*uiy of vcu vtll sav ts^i5 : 
Aye are '-vren^ ar.d w<* are. pXcjc> ; 
ijtg cn ait uiuu^vctcutt uecafil 
W'eU, titere was a. :ia^.» witen **^.. : 
helped cut iix a po^t -;^txv afi 
Chri^tn,*$ time*. Cards co:ue ia 
by th*? iho^u^ds. r\wle !a«. 
bored *tt sorutt^ thciUs If ycu - 
enough lv * ^eiui a Chitsiinas over saw ; thU :iccu*u*lta,tK*h Ok 
c*n\l toa mmx \ve kn*nv* Put "^ busiiK>ss ear^; and oiau\ dowu> 

tigi\t adwrtisi^ iu vSe n^W- 
of wh*\t C^vsstnuvs should be- 
you wou\i b< as sicX of i\ a*. ! 

Ws> e*ut h&tft ail the *r^u- . 
nieaU censing up *uul"wo v».Ut. ' 
W t\*id thiU vve ;u*e ur.eharit- 

WO *«0 CsUvOUS; *Uld }USt 



voan^e 



tuny "diNictitt: 
rt» our 



you ever 

u :s to stoj> tho vusioon. 

Chvistnus list there av\* |h\*v^ 
to whoan wjo is aCralvt \v$%, to 
send u c*u v r(ov tV>ar trat th*>y 

\vU\ send us oju\ And so th*> r 
list swoWs and s'^vvs; ^00 vwvds 
u ,\cav avo iuvo<>Siiv.v to Kofep 

tup with this cwstxuu. Multiply 

t'HU l\v t v ve uumlH'f of P*\H>k\ 
M*iu,lu\i{ theju iind «K«S vchetv it 
iioos. • 

Ntuv lot's mako this cK\^t> 'X§ 
scud x\ Chvisimits Ktvcth^ to tt 
poison \vo a\o fotul of, to vy-ult 
htm ov iu*r u M^rry CUvisltua.^ 
U u kind uu,| jj«;ncroua vttsUvitx. 
.specially since It savos writing 
iy W\W\\ \\\ Uyis s<?nsv\ it Is im 
oxcusahlo labour saving do vivo 
nui,l u fonn ot" Iv^luvd biidtr 
noss. 'Ihovo mo lots otpcoplo 
otio only hvurs (torn ix\ Ohvis^. 



aU2v* 

a bit stuNuv ^vu*\ uwybo sos 
But it you \v;u\i lo svud a Vi;u\ ; 
a vommdvv tv\ as.\ him to ds> ■ 
business wilU >\nt u*\n> yevu*. do 
it Ujc nil nusuts. bvtt do not v\<H. . 
it a Christnxa.s c*.u\l. And it ' ■ 

yon wsutt to do soma advetlis,- / 

*% well that's (in v\ l\> it.; 
Qnly CitU it that. And- it yoti, ;c 
vvanl to rcatemlKn\ a iK^rsoat w - '•" 

^hviKtnuts d»vy \\vll, wriW Kijip^: : '; 
mul say ski. Uut lot us not Uav*> 

thj.s hugo avaUinche <>I VVir^fH J '-' 
iiv most cases u misvepros^ntu- - 
tioav vX wtcts and fechn^s. 



- -' 



TEST QF PATIENCE 



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Tfca K*w«*** Km a*4 **«* *%*«4*y, D«. M*51 fa** 1J 



WINS TURKEY 

H. Hodge of 56 Millard Ave. 

won the 18 lb- turkey, first prize 
in 'the Office Specialty Hockey 
Club draw. Gord. Shier won 
second prize, a 7 lb. chicken. 
Peter Neufeld and his ticket 
selling corps wish to thank all 
those who purchased tickets. 



WSB 




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News 0/ T/ie W./. 



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New* fur this column mutt b* in tttt offle* Monday 
aight Copy must be written u briefly u poaublc and 
confined to newi and reports. Other than routine rtporta 
and announcement* will be printed s«f>arately. 



Newmarket W. 1. will meet 
one week early on Thursday, 
Dec. 13. A good Christmas pro- 
gram will be provided. Special 
collection for overseas boxes will 
be taken. Please note the change 
of date. 



Mr. and Mrs. Douglas I. D. Finiay are pictured above following 
their recent marriage in St. Paul's Anglican church, Newmarket. 
The bride is Althca Virginia, daughter of Mrs. Althea VanSant, 
Newmarket, and the groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Finiay, Toronto. 



At Kingcrafts Meeting 
Display Historical Dolls 

The Pageant of Historical Of interest to the rugging 
Dolls v/as the feature attraction group was a design done in 
of the Kingcrafts Guild meeting j water colors by Mr. Frank Fog, 
at the home of Mrs. Geoffrey an artist at King. At n suggestion 



The Vandorf branch regular 
meeting was held at the home 
of Mrs. Ray McCarron on Wed- 
nesday, Nov. 21, with Mrs. H. C. 
Powell, the president, presiding. 

There was a large number at- 
tending, and it was decided to 
send donations to the Jamaica 
Hurricane Relief Fund and to 

the W.I. Tractor Fund to Greece. 
Committees were appointed to 
arrange for n play to be put on 
; by Women's Institute members 
and a penny sale to take place 
in the spring. 

Mrs. II. Hillary gave a splen- 
did report on the area conven- 
tion which was held in Toronto. 

During the social hour Mrs, 
McCarron turned the television 
to the Kate Smith show. Hos- 
tesses were: Mrs. A. C. McTag- 
gart, Mrs. II.. C. Powell and Mrs. 
F. Preston. 

The next meeting will be the 
Grandmothers' Christmas pro- 
gram at the home of Mrs. Harold 
Sleeth on Wednesday, Dec. 12. 
There will be n demonstration 
of Christmas wrapping. Current 
events will be given by Mrs. H. 
Dewsbury. Roll call Is to be 
answered with "'Childhood mem- 
ories of Christmas" and a col- 
lection for the pablum fund. 

Hostesses are Mrs. S. Aylelt, 
Miss Pearl Cale and Mrs. Ste- 
phen Eado. 



opened the very enjoyable pro- 
gram, followed by a trio of 
grandmothers, Mrs. F. Billings, 

Mrs. A. Jewitt and Mrs. H. 
Proctor, singing "When You and 
I Were Young, Maggie," with 
Mrs. Chalmer Black at the piano. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Marshall gave a 
reading of 50 years ago. Cur- 
rent events by Mrs. Louis do 
Vrics. The prize for the oldest 
grandmother went to Mrs. Ern- 
est Fry, and the youngest to Mrs. 
Albert Farren. Costume prize 
to Mrs. H. Proctor. Readings 
were also given by Mrs. A. 
Jewitt and Mrs. C. Walton. 

The slip-covering course un- 
der the leadership of Miss Brian 
of Toronto was held nt the home 
of Mrs. Sabin. There were eight 
ladies present. 



Realty, Drynock Farms, Yonge 
St., on November 28. Lady Fla- 
velle, the president, presided. 

Mrs. R. L. McFarlane of 
Maple created the doll figures, 
which are miniature replicas of 
famous personalities, from the 
12th century to modern concert 
stars and Hollywood personali- 
ties. She showed 00 of the ISO 
dolls she had made. 

The costumes are authentic 
reproductions. The bodies are 
made of cotton and the faces 
painted and embroidered to ac- 
cent the features. They bear a 
great likeness to the persons 
whom they represent. 

One of the groups displayed 
was King Henry VIII and his 
six wives, attired in their royal 
robes and jewels. Other dolls 
were: a Harlem comedy team, 
Princess Elizabeth, u pioneer 
mother arid her baby. Mrs. Mc- 
Farlane spoke briefly about her 
work. Site was. (hanked by Mrs. 
II* Bryan, and presented with a 
bouquet of chrysanthemums. 
Mrs. McFarlane Joined the or* 
ganization that afternoon, and 
has offered to make a character 

doll for the bazaar raffle next 
June. 

• Mr*. K. C. Moyer, one of the 
founders of the Georgetown 
Arts and Crafts, and a co-owner 
of "KfrkeraHs", near Brampton, 
told how the Georgetown group 
was organized in 1040 by five 
would-be artists. She told of 
Its development to the present 
stage of 40 working members, 
and flpoko of the growing popu- 
larity of work sales. With her 
was Mrs. John McDermott, a 
weaver from Brampton. 



made earlier by Mr. Thor Han- 
sen, the design embodied the 
flower of each of the 10 prov- 
inces and scenes at King. \ 

Active membership in King- 
crafts will be limited to 100, un- 
til a community hall is built in 
King. There is, of course, no 
limit on associate membership. 
It .was decided to withdraw 
membership in the Canadian 
Handcraft. Guild for fl the pres- 
ent. The constitution and by- 
laws of the organization were 
approved by members. 
$1,260 Sale Objective 

An objective of $1,200 has 
been set for the first public work 
sale and bazaar to be held on 
June 4, 1052, at "Klngswold", the 
home of I*ady Fiavellc. Each 
crafter is asked to contribute 
two pieces of her bcjl work, 
and in addition, each working 
({roup wilt give a special piece 
for the raffle. Mrs. Horry Ed- 
wards and Mrs. James Rock 
have offered to make a hand- 
pieced quilt for the draw. Other 

fund-raising booths will be homo 
cooking and plants and n Cale- 
donia market (Interesting mis- 
cellaneous articles). Afternoon 
tea will !hs served. 

Starling in the New Year, 
members nro being naked to 
sell 20 draw tickets at 25c each. 
Mrs. Really will convene the 
sale. Mrs. Phnir will lw in 
charge of display and Mrs. Bob 
Benson will convene the mar- 
ket. 

Lady Flavolle announced tiio 
formation of Tccncrafters, n 
teen-agers' group studying motal 
work, and affiliated with King- 
crafts. There will not be p 
general meeting In December, 
but in January an evening meet- 
ing will be hold in King United 
church, when it Is expected that 
Sir Ellsworth Fiavellc will show 
films, 

Refreshments were served by 
the weaving group, Mrs. Ernest 
Holph and Mrs. W. Harpor pour- 
ed tea til tho dining table. On 
behalf of Kingcrafts, Mrs. Ivan 
Specht expressed appreciation 
to Mrs. Beutty for her hospi- 
tality. 



Lakeside branch held its No- 
vember meeting Tuesday even- 
ing. The president, Mrs. P. Ma- 
honey, conducted the business, 
after which Mrs. Boothby dem- 
onstrated smocking. 

Mrs. F. Marritt described 

flower arrangements from the 
Royal Winter Futr. 

Mrs. M. Rye, our delegate to 
Toronto convention, gave a de- 
tailed report of the . sessions, 

Mrs. Agar conducted a com- 
petition. Tho hostesses, Mrs. J. 
Gable and Mrs. A. Pollock, serv- 
ed delicious refreshments. 



The Kettleby branch met at 
the home of Mrs. Robt. Jewitt 
on Wednesday, Nov. 21, with the 
president, Mrs. Schmidt, in the 
chair. 

Committees for Christmas 
work are: Ontario hospital, Mrs. 
R. Jewitt, Mrs. E. 11. West, Mrs. 
John Davis and Mrs. Eugene 
Polkihghorne; York County 
Homo, Mrs. Fred Schmidt, Mrs. 

E. Wood, Mrs. Wm. Hodgson and 
Mrs. John Maglnn. 

Five dollars was voted toward 
the tractor fund for Greece, also 
$5.00 to purchase flour to he sent 
to Greece. 

The December meeting will lw 
held at tho homo of Mrs, Carman 
Wilson at 8 p.m. on December 
12. Will the Indies please have 
their scropbooks, aprons and 
magazines on hand. 

A fine report of tho area con- 
vention was given by Mrs. Al- 
tar! Farren. Tho meeting was 
then turned over to tho commit- 
tee In charge of tho grandmo- 
thers' program. A akit by Mrs, 
H . Proctor and Mrs. E. B, West 

RAVENSHOE 

Tho December meeting of the 
W.M.S. will ho hold Thursday, 
Dec. 13, at tho homo of Mrs. Curl 
Glover. Boll call will ho an- 
swered . with « scripture verso 
beginning with tho letter "K". 
There v. ill he election of officers. 
All Indb.-s are urged to attend. 

Make a date to attend tho 
Ravenslioo public school Christ- 
mas concert on December 12. 



King branch meeting will be 
held at the home of Mrs. Bur- 
well Jackson on Tuesday even- 
ng, Dec. 11. Mrs. Jackson is 
convener of citizenship and edu- 
cation and is planning to engage 
n speaker to talk on an import- 
ant • phase of education. The 
motto is "Education's first goal 
is tho power of distinguishing 
what is first rate and what is 
not." Mrs. J. P. Norrls will ex- 
plain the context of the motto, 
and Mrs. 'Ivan Specht will con- 
duct current events. 

For roll call, members arc re- 
quested to make a cash donation 
toward purchase of a Christmas 
basket for n neighborhood fam- 
ily who have recently been be- 
reaved and are deserving of 
sympathy and encouragement 
There are three young children, 
and the mother who will ap- 
preciate n Christmas gesture. 

Arrangements wilt l>c made for 
organization of the rummage 
sale in January. The committee 
in charge of the social hour Is: 
Mrs. Specht, Mrs. J. P. Nurris, 
Mrs. Stan Hunter and Mrs. P. 
A. McNaughton. 



Mrs. Aubrey Campbell will 
entertain Irnskay branch at her 
home on Tuesday afternoon, Dec. 
11, when 'a Christmas verse will 
form the roll call. "Peace on 
earth, goodwill to men," the 
motto of the afternoon, will bo 
explained by Mrs. Stanley Kerr. 
" Mrs. Lome Scott's topic la 
"Christmas Suggestions." A 
touch and take table will ho in 
charge of Mrs. Effie Bath, and 
tho lunch conveners are: Mrs. 
Tutt/ Mrs. S. Kerr and Miss 
Maisle Richards. Mrs. Norman 
Egnn, tho president, will bo In 
tho chair. 



The Snowball branch met at 
tho homo of Mrs. Ed. Heddick on 
Wednesday of last week with 12 
members and six guests present. 
The first vice-president, Mrs. 
Howard Morning, opened tho 
meeting with the ode, followed 
by tho Mary Stewart collect. 

Tho roll call, "Christmas Sug- 
gestions," gave all present sev- 
eral good Ideas. Plans were 
made for the turkey supper, for 
tho directors of the Plowmen's 
Association, to ho held on 
Thursday, Dee. A. The president. 
Mrs. II. Patrick, gave her re- 
port on tho area convention held 
at tho Royal York hotel. 

Tho next mooting will bo hold 
at tho home of Mrs. W. F« 
Browne, on tho Gamble side- 
rood. 




Mount 




Mr, and Mrs. Norman Brown 
and family wore guests of honor 
on Sunday, Dec, 2, at Stouff- 
villa Christian Memorial church 
at the dedication «f » new organ 
donated to this church by Mr. 
and Mrs, Robert Burnett in 
memory of their great-nephew, 
William David Brown. Tho or- 
gan will boar a plaque with the 
following inscription: "This or- 
gan has been purchased by Mr. 
and Mrs, Robert Burnett and 
donated to the glory of Chid and 
In loving memory of William 
David Brawn, Sergeant U120H17 

With tho Black Watch Royal 
Highlanders' Regiment of Can* 
adn, twloVed son of Norman end 
Krmo Brown, killed In action 
March 1, l IMS, In his 38rd year, 
Hi Dadlmrg. Hurled at Nljmo- 
gen, Holland, R.I, A. Their 
works do follow them." 

Mr. and Mrs, liloyil Decks 
and family of Preston and Mr. 
and Mrs. Norman Brown and 
family had dinner after the ser- 
vice with Mr, nnd Mrs. Robert 
Burnett. Mr. Brown Is a nephew 
of tho Burnetts, 

Mr. and Mrs. R, C, Baycroft 
and Bobby and Mrs. John Ash 
attended the organ dedication 
Hurvlee at StuufMIlo Christian 
Memorial church on Huntley 
morning. 

Tho Mount Pugnh WA wilt 
have their meeting at tho home 
of Mrs. Harry Smith on Wed- 
nesday, Doe. 19. Mm. Mont- 
gomery wilt have th« devotional. 
nnd there will bo the annual 
election of officer*. Roll cull In 
a donation towards the purchnw 
of dUhci for (ha churcn, Hos- 



tess Ih Mm, C. Pattondon. 

The Sunday school has chang- 
ed their Chrltdmus concert date 
to Friday, Dee. 31. Be auro to 
keep thlrt evening open. Time, 
R p.m. 

S. S, No. and S. S. No. 7 are 
having their concert* on Thurs- 
day, Dei?, 81). 

Congratulations to Mr. and 
Mrs, Harrison Behllehter on the 
safe arrival of n daughter on 
Sunday, Nov. 8B. 

Sympathy Is extended to Mm. 
C. 4- Montgomery, whoso hIk- 
tor postied awey nt Midland 
about two voukN ago. 

Mr, and Mm. Roy Smith nnd 
Shirley ware Sunday Htipper 
guests of Mr. and Mm. Clnronco 
Paolo and family, Cedar Velley. 

MUs Dorothy Bnyeroft opout 
the weekend In Toronto, the 
gueat of Mr. nnd Mm. Harold 
CMIUh. Mr. and Mm. (llllis 
brought Dorothy homo on Hun- 
day end had tmppor with the 
BnyeroRs. 

Mr. and Mr*, ilownrd Broome 
ant! family, Cnnenrd, were sup- 
per gticHtH on Sunday nf Mr. end 
Mr*. Meredith AhH and Sheila. 

Mr, Ctom Kllun and Mr. Oavo 
Rlchanlinn apont tho weekend In 
SI. Catharines end Buffalo, 

Mr. Al« Harvey, Brougham, 
vlflllod tho Roldi on Sunday. 

Mto* Alice Dolf, Toronto, vlfl- 
llod Mr. end Mrs. !.oh. Smith 
for tho weekend, end all had 
■upper with Mm. {John, Union, 
vllle, on Sunday, 

;Tha two world wnra Increased 

the appetite for foreign now* in 
C#na4a. 



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FEATURES BAZAAR 



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raHaaLsajant 

Nathan 'Longhurst, a resident 
of Zephyr, died on October 29 at 



A parcel post sale will be a 

feature of the tea and bazaar 

being held on Friday, Dec. 1, by 

the ladies* Auxiliary, Canadian 

Toronto General hospital. A son J Legion, Newmarket branch. The 



YOUNG HOPEFULS <m Mmorm Mint bowmj* 

Norene And Movies 



GUEST OF HONOR 

Miss Joan Mc Arthur, bride- 
elect of December 1, was the 
guest of honor at a miscellaneous 



slower held at the home of Mrs. 

Fred Bennison on Tuesday, Nov. 

20. About 20 friends gathered _ 

for the social evening. Dainty assisted by Mrs. Villeneuve. . ' " . f 



refreshments were served foU; 

lowing the opening of th* rnany 
lovely gifts. The 



of the late Joseph and Elizabeth 
Longhurst, he married Violet 
Leitch in 1898, who predeceased 
hint in 1919. In 1921 he married 
Mrs. Sarah Gould who survives. 

Seven children survive from 
the first marriage: Delbert and 
Bert of Zephyr; Clarence of 
Brown Hill; Maisie (Mrs. Gor- 
don Mainprize), Holt; Edith 
(Mrs. Midd Collins), Oshawa; 
Olive (Mrs. Mervin iLonghurst), 
Belhaven; Blanche (Mrs. Lloyd 
Stiles) of Oak Ridges. 

One son survives the second 
marriage, Harry of Oak Ridges. 
Service was held October 31 
in Mount Albert chapel, with 
Rev. Prittle of the Mennonites 
in charge- 
Pallbearers were his six 
grandsons. Interment was in 
North Zephyr cemetery. 



affair will be held in the Legion 
hall frbm 2 to 5 p.m. Mrs. Chas. 
Gordon will convene the parcel 
post sale- 
General convener of the ba- 
zaar is Mrs, Robert Burin. There 
will be a bake table, home-made 
candy, sewing and fancy work, 
as well .as the afternoon tea 
Mrs. Howard Newton will super- 
vise a nursery *or the pre-school 
age children. 



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Ever tried to move a piano? 
You know how heavy it is — 
and how it's apt to mark the 
floor. Things will be different 
when they make pianos of light- 
weight aluminum. Already one 
firm has started making alumi- 
num bi-kty portable pianos. 

During Alcan's fifty years in 
Canada, so many new uses have 
been found for aluminum that 
today we operate 12 plants in 
various parts of the country 
and the industry provides em* 
ploymcnt for thousands — and 
that's not counting all die 
people who work for more 
than 3000 Canadian companies 
which shape Aican aluminum 
into all sorts of forms from 
fish tags to airplanes. Alumi- 
num Company of Canada, Ltd* 
/Alcan> 




OBITUARY 

Mrs . E ritrtra Western 

One of the most devoted mem- 
bers of Trinity United church, 
Mrs. Elmira Western passed 
away suddenly at her home, 51 
Millard Ave., Newmarket, on 
November 22, 1951. 

Born on the fourth concession 
of Whitchurch in 1864, daugh- 
ter of Sarah Arm and Henry 
Wilson, she married Frederick 
Western, Little Britain, who pre- 
deceased her many years ago. 

Surviving are one son and 
three daughters, Harold F. Wes- 
tern of Orillia; Mrs. John Jack- 
son (Olive), Newton brook; Mrs. 
Raymond Morton (Blanche), 
Newmarket; and Mrs. Victor 
Lynden (Edith), Port Coiborne. 
Ten grandchildren, eight great 
grandchildren, one great-great 
grandson, and one brother, 
Frank H. Wilson, Dinuba, CaL, 
also survive her. 

Having spent some years in 
Aurora, the last 35 years of her 
life she lived in Newmarket and 
outside her home and family 
her main interests were her 
church and the W.C.T.U. 

She was a member of the 
Board of Stewards in Trinity 
United church, Newmarket, a 
vice-president of Toronto Centre 
Presbyterial North, president of 
County of York and Peel W. C. 
T. U., and president of the New- 
market W.C.T.U. for several 
years. 

Rev. M. J. Aiken officiated at 
the funeral services, held at the 
chapel of Roadhouse and Rose, 
Newmarket, on November 24. 

Pallbearers were Fred West- 
ern, John Taylor, Jas. Hope, Ar- 
thur Sanguine, George McCono- 
chie and John Halliday. 

Interment was in the New- 
market cemetery. 



SUTTON TO HEAR 
"TRIAL BY JURY" 

Students of Sutton high school 
will present Gilbert and Sulli- 
van's "Trial by Jury", on Thurs- 
day and Friday evenings, Dec. 

6 and 7. Mrs. Angus Cowieson 
and Mr. Donald Felker will di- 
rect the production, and the 
cast includes: Richard Holborn, 
judge; Jean Melville, plaintiff; 
Richard Bodley, defendant; 
Hugh Kernohan, counsel for the 
plaintiff; Donald Walker, fore- 
man; Ron Johnston, usher; and 
the school Glee Club, accom- 
i parried by Mary Burrows. Last 
year the group presented "H. M. 
S. Pinafore." 



V: ■*$■' -- 

^ - 5. iBuses are the real thing when 
your school or club Is play- 
ing a game or having a social 
y -f. : evening out of town. The/re 
■S.Sp Jnandy for shows and other 
events too. Jf your crowd is 
large enough, you can make 




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KING GEOHCE HOTEL, 



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PACK GIFT BALE 

I-ast week members of the 
Evening Auxiliary, V/.A. t St. 
Paul's Anglican church, New- 
market, packed a bale for the 
while settlers in northern Can- 
ada. Convening the project were 
Mrs. Harold Evans and Mrs. 
Bruce Hunter. 

The group met at the rectory 
on Monday, Nov. 19, to discuss 
their Christmas missionary 
work. Rev. J. t. lihodes led the 
group in its study period. Mrs. 
Bert Jiudd presided. 



VANDORF 

(Held from Jast week) 
Mr. and Mrs. George Bilton 
spent the weekend with Mrs. 
Hilton's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
H. A. Switzer. 

Guests at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. H. A. Swlt/er on Sunday 
were Mrs. Holmes and Mrs. Clif- 
ford King of Aurora, Mr. and 
Mrs. Kenneth Jiabcock and Mr. 
and Mrs. Mackay MeUan of 
Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Oliver 
and Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Oliver 
attended Uie funeral on Satur- 
day of their cousin, Mrs. Kd, 
Church (formerly Minnie Oli- 
ver) of Bradford. Burial was in 
Newmarket cemetery. 

Mr. and Mr*. Herbert Oliver 
had Sunday tea with Mr. and 
Mrs. Wesley I/jhman of Clare- 
mont. 

^ Mr. and Mrs. John Irwin had 
Sunday dinner with the latter'* 
father, Mr. A. Thoxter; and 
Marie, Johnnie and Barbara Jr* 
win had Sunday dinner with 
(heir cousins, the Kwcn family 
of Holt. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dudley Foster 
spent Sunday with Mr. Foster's 
sister, tArx. Klmer Ixe, and Mr. 
I-ee and children of Zephyr. 

Mr, and Mrs. Grant Morley 
and BilHe, Mrs. Jf. A. While, Bob 
and fluih- hod Sunday dinner 
with Mrs. While's Mother, Mrs, 
Loveless of Markham. 



GROUPS SPONSOR 
HEALTH CENTRES 

In response to appeals from 
public health nurses of the York 
County Health Unit, Women's 
Institutes have agreed to spon- 
sor Child Health Centres in 
Markham Village, Richmond 
Hill, Newmarket, Woodbridge, 
Maple, Unionville and Stouff- 
Ville, reports Dr. Robert M. 
King, M.O.H., in his November 
report to the board of the Unit. 
The "Well Baby Clinics" are 
held in each community once a 
month. I n Stouf fville the 
Centre will take the place of 
the Mothercraft clinic. All spon- 
soring organizations provide 
space for the project and fur- 
ish volunteer help. In Sutton 
the local Red Cros- branch will 
sponsor the Centre. 

A total of 40 cases of com- 
municable diseases was reported 
to this Unit during October, in- 
cluding nine cases of poliomye- 
litis in the entire area; the dis- 
ease usually has disappeared by 
late autumn. • 

Health Unit nurses are again 
immunizing school-age and pre- 
school children. This will Jater 
be carried on at the new Child 
Health Centres. 

Sanitary Inspectors inspected 
22 schools during October, said 
Dr. King. Conditions are re- 
ported to the Medical Officer 
of Heatih, and reco/nmendations 
made to the school board in 
each case. 



Norene, eight years old, is a 
regular Saturday movie-goer, 

and evidently deeply impressed 

by some of the tilings she sees. 

Although Norene never misses 
a Saturday movie, she has never 
been very talkative about the 
movies she sees. When Norene's 
parents question her about them," 
they never get enough informa- 
tion to know whether or not 
their child , has absorbed any- 
thing from what she has seen. 
Norene insists she likes all of 
the movies and is eager to go 
next time. 

Norene's parents see no reason 
why she shouldn't go regularly, 
since there is no indication of 
any ill effects. Besides not talk- 
ing about what she has seen, she 
never imitates anything she has 
seen or heard — perhaps she just 

goes for the outing or for the 
fun of eating pop-corn. 

It wasn't until a recent un- 
usual experience that Norene's 
parents realized she was absorb- 
ing the pictures to the extent 
that she was deeply impressed 
by them. 

Norene had had a few stitches 
taken (result of an accident), 
which required an anaesthesia. 
Before, she had entirely gained 
consciousness, she noticed the 
nurse put a glass on the table. 
Norene cautioned the nurse, 
"You mustn't do that. It will 
mark the table." 



at the remark, but the nurse had 
seen a recent movie which had 
a similar incident and in which 
one of the characters was cau- 
tioned about putting a glass on 
the table. The little incident had 
made an indelible impression on 
Norene. The nurse was able to 
satisfy Dorene by telling her 
that the hospital table would not 
mark, since it had a washable 
surface instead of polished wood 
as in the picture. 

Because the nurse had seen 
the same picture, it was the sub- 
ject of conversation while Dor- 
ene was convalescing. Dorene's 
accurate recollections proved she 
didn't miss many of the details. 

An excitable, talkative child 
often frees himself of ideas be- 
fore they have made a lasting 
impression; whereas the silent 

type absorbs and retains impres- 
sion^." 



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WILL BUY RADIOS 

The Newmarket Home and 
School association at its Novem- 
ber meeting decided to purchase 
auxiliary equipment for use in 
the public schools. Three radios 
for use in the Stuart Scott, Alex- 
ander Muir and King George 
schools and a couch for the 
nurse's room at the Prince 
Charles school will be purchased 
by the group. Funds were 
raised for these projects through 



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RECEIVES MANJf CUTS 

A miscellaneous shower was 
held by the Junior Evening Aux- 
iliary in honor of Miss Alberta 
Atkins, bride-elect of Dec. 3. 
The party was held at the home 
of Mrs. Bruce McClymont on 
Tuesday, Nov. 27. There were 
about 25 present. 

The honoree v/as the recipient 
of many lovely gifts. At the 
close of a social evening, re- 
freshments were served by 
members of the group. 



ZEPHYR 

The bazaar and potluck supper 
held under the auspices of the 
W.M.S, of the United church was 
a decided success. 

Mr. and Mrs. Terry McCarrick 
(nee Daisy Graham ) returned 
from their honeymoon at Ni- 
agara Falls and left for their 
new home at Verdun, Quelle. 
The good wishes of the commun- 
ity go with them in their new 
home. 

Mrs. Julius llynard left on 
Sunday to spend the winter with 
her daughter, Mrs. Howard Pal- 
mer, in Toronto. 

Mr. Horner Walker v/as token 
to Newmarket hospital on Sun- 
day and operated on for appen- 
dicitis. We hop* he may have 
a speedy recovery. 

A number of the W.I. ladies' 
at Zephyr attended (he home 
economics class held at Sand- 
ford on Tuesday. 

The neighbors o/ the 4th con- 
cession of Scott called at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Thompson on Tuesday evening 
U) hid them and their daughter 
Wildtt farewell, prior to their 
departure to their new home at 
Sharon. Tho evening was spent 
in community singing und 
speeches. Tlio Thompsons were 
presented with a coffee table 
and serving tray and Wilrta was 
given a pair of boudoir lamps. 

Tho Christ man meeting of the 
W.MS, was held In Ihu Sunday 
school room* Tho meeting . wn» 
a randlolfHht service with 
Christmas carols. 

A numher from hero attended 
tho commencement at the Ux- 
hrjrtge high whool I* 

Mrs. E, Profit returned home 
after spending some time with 
friends at Petcrbnro, 

Tho Sunday school of* the 
United church will hold their 
Christmas concert and potluck 
aupper on Friday evening, Dee. 
14. 



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the association's catering to a 
banquet in October and the 
Norene's mother was surprised holding of an opportunity sale. 













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•PRIZE WINNING EDITORIAL PAGE 
•WOMEN'S PAGES AND FEATURES 
•SPORT NEWS AND COLUMNS 
•FEATURE STORIES AND COMMENTS 
•DISTRICT AND LOCAL NEWS , 



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MAKE EACH WEEK A REMINDER OF 
YOUR BEST WISHES THROUGHOUT THE YEAR. 






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Representative for Newmarket and District ■'". 
Nenaaa W. Oreeosides, Ktltlthy, OnL, Phono Aaron 1S1M 



Fili In thli form tad wad II 
enclosed with &£* (|3 Id V3JL} 
for one year; |4 (|5 in VSA.) 
for two yean, to The Newiw- 

ket Era and Express, Ncwmjur- 
het p Ontario. 



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T^NEWMAmRETERAAKXHESS 



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THE CARIBOU AND A PLAY 



In the hinterland of British Columbia little known 
save to pioneers adventurers and missionaries lies the 
great tract of land known as the Caribou, 

Here people live in small set- "faith of 



Marian Martin Patterns 



in 
tlement* in tiny villages or in 
isolated homes. In their brief 
summers they have the beauty 
of towering mountains, the sheen 
of lake and river, and the sight 
of growing things. 

In the winter the temperature 
goes down and down and down, 
and 50 beJow is not uncommon. 
And it is here, in this rugged 
land where men sometimes de- 
scend in the scale of living to the 
level of beasts, that young mis- 
sionaries go forth to preach the 
Gospel to bring the good tidings 
of great joy to those v/ho v/ill 
hear. 
Shower Fief urea 

Rev, Gordon Hunter brought 
all this to us on Sunday even- 
ing of last week, when by the 
tale of his own work in the Cari- 
bou and with pictures of it, he 
showed xxs what some men are 
doing to obey Christ's command, 
"to go into all the world and 
preach." 

From William's Lake, where 
he was stationed, the trails to 
the 42 places he was to visit 
rayed out like the spokes of a 
wheel. 

The roads in the spring were 
not roads but ruts, so deep that 
once in there v/as no out till 
some place had been reached. 
V/e saw pictures of men on 
horseback pulling the minister's 
car out of the mud, and it v/as 
an experience T, for one, would 
be loath to share, for the horses 
were western horses and one 
Xeit, looking on, that as they 
reared up they would either 
fall back and crush the car or 
break it to pieces. However, 
neither the riders nor the driver 
seemed upset, so I suppose it 
was all in the day's work. 

The sheer drops beside these 
roads would be enough to give 
the ordinary driver heart failure, 
end yet these young missioners 
go on feeding the people who 
"cannot live by bread alone"* 
ChrUtmaj Time 

Mr. Hunter told us of a Christ- 
mas service at 50 below, when 
he, the minister, wore every- 
thing he could pile on, including 
gloves, and the organist played 
with gloves on, for otherwise his 
fingers would have frozen and, 
at the communion service, Ihe 
wine froze in the cups. They 
held these over the fire until 
it came away from the sides 
of the cup and came out like 
a little ball. 

Wo saw the little churches, 
and the schools where ministers 
and teachers try to feed child- 
ren and adults with mental and 
spiritual food. 

Euch little community has a 
.-stampede of its own, and we 

saw the wild riding and the 
•enthusiasm of the onlookers. Mr. 

Hunter said the v/ork of the 
:mi8sionary Is to keep alive the 



. * 




The pomf for boautifol 
WALLS & CEILINGS 



our fathers" in those 
v/ho are amid an almost pagan 
v/ay of life! to baptize, to marry, 
to conduct funeral services, and 
to try to reach out to those v/ho 
have never known Christ or who 
in the wild country have discard- 
ed all belief and live lives as 

wild. 

It is good for us people in our 
comfortable homes to know that 
these young soldiers of the Cross 
are holding the front line for 
Christ, as surely as our soldiers 
in Korea are holding the line for 
democracy. 

We cannot all be missionaries 

but we can pray and we can 

give. 

At Pickering College 

On Saturday evening Archie 
and I travelled to the college to 
see George Bernard Shaw's play, 
•The Devil's Disciple". Now, 
the other half of the family and 
I rather pride ourselves on al- 
ways being on time. 

It is said, and now we know 
it's true, that pride goes before 
a fall, and ours had a serious 
fall. We arrived about two 
minutes late, and the door was 
just shut, which left us to v/ait 
with some others for the end 
of the first act. It v/as a good 

lesson. 

Any experience is tv/ice as 
pleasant when shared, and Ar- 
chie and I always find double 
enjoyment v/hen v/e see any- 
thing together. Saturday night 
we were not close enough to 
talk much, but I had quite won- 
derful sharers. You sec, Mrs. 
Blackstock took pity on my 
smallness and got us squeezed in 
near the front, and my neigh- 
bors v/ere a small boy and girl. 
I'm always a little afraid that 
children will not care for a 
grown-up to start talking, but 
here the boy took the initiative 
and from there on v/e compared 
notes and discussed many things. 
These tv/o small people were 
relatives of Mr. and Mrs. Beer, 
and come to the college for most 
of the entertainment Archie, 
meantime, was given the first 
act by Brian Blackstock, so we 
had that pleasant experience of 
meeting new young friends. 
"Devil's DteeTple" 

The play, "The Devil's Dis« 
cipJe", was in the true Shaw tra- 
dition — drama, humor, wit and 
compelling interest. 

The characters v/ero well 
chosen: Dick Dudgeon, the 
Devil's Disciple, played by Peter 
Wigston, was fine, and showed 
how in the hour of trial, a man 
enn shed the shackles of habit, 
and stand forth — a man. Judith 
Anderson, played by Maire Jack- 
son, was very fine. Her vascilln- 
ttons between supposed love and 
duty were excellently "portrayed. 

Her husband, Rev. Anthony 
Anderson, played by Win, Mc- 
Guire, was also a difficult part, 
as it portrayed a man's change 
from pacifism to a fighting 
spirit. 

The parts of General Bur- 
goyne and Mujor Swindon, ploy- 
ed by James Watson and Ken- 
neth Brandie, brought us into 
contact with the British officer. 

Space does not permit me to 
mention all the cast, which was 
chosen by a master hand and 
certainly Mr. Meikfo and Mr. 
Beer and their associates de- 
serve the thanks of Newmarket 
for bringing us a presentation 
such as this. 







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IHT1RNATIOMAL MARYlSfU 



dtfflTFuMI 

10 tor Km* 
Mrs 




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Harvester Dealers 

* Mm* Willi JStf 

S DRW., NEWMARKET 
PHONE 900 



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BIRTHDAY 
CLUB 



9232 12-20,30— 12^£ 



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CHOSE the best design for 

your good fabric! This takes top 

honors in fashion, with Its smart 
n ewdetails which you accent with 
bias binding. Shown here as a 
casual in a cotton check — it could 
also «o to lea or dinner made In 
a taffeta or other dressy fabric! 
Pattern 0232 in sizes 12, 14, 16, 
18, 20: m, 32. M, 36, 38, 40, 42. 
Size 1G takes 4 1-2 yards 35-inch. 

Ihis easy-to-use pattern give* 
perfect fit. Complete, llluslratei 
SvW Chart shows you every step. 

Send TIIIRTY-FIVB CENTO 
<35c> In coins {stamps cannot be 
accepted) for this pattern. Print 
plainly SIZK, NAME, ADURKSS, 
STVLK NUMBER. 

Send your order to MARIAN 
MARTIN, care of The Newmarket 
Era and Express, Pattern Dept., 
Newmarket. 



NINE ITEMS! Your little girl 

will have the hest-drcssed dolly In 

the neighborhood! Each garment 
Is one piece to cut and sew. There 
are two pretty party frocks, 1ml 
purse! Pattern 9174 In doll sizes 
cape, jumper, blouse, undies and 
14, lf>, 18, 20, 22. inches. You could 
use scraps for many of these gnr- 
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This easy-to-use pattern gives 
perfect fit. Complete, Illustrated 
Sew Chart shows you every step. 

Send TIIIRTV-FIVR CENTS 

(35c) In coins (stamps cannot be 

accepted) for this pattern. Print 
plainly 8IZB, NAME, ADDRESS, 
8TYIX NUMBER. 

Send your order to MARIAN 
MARTIN, care of the Newmarket 
Era and Express, Pattern Dept., 

Newmarket. 



Needleeraft News 




by Pauline Roy 

WOMEN FOR eaaturfee futvt been familiar with tho arte and experts in - 
needlecraft. All of us have done our nhare nt one tiroa or another 
through pleasure or sometimes necessity. Necdluwork is a must and high on' 

th a list of requirements 

for ths perfect wife, 
The women to-day are 
well avrars of this and 
daily they aro becom- 
ing more enthusiastic 
about all the thing* 
thoy can do and all the 
UiinxM lliwy cuii make. 
Thoy know Die nicer 
things and they know 
how to go about get- 
ting them. 

Embroidery Is one of 
ths oldest types of all 
fancy work, fho ladles 
of the courts used to 
work designs depicting 
the events of tho day. 
noma of these master- 

f>iec«s havo given us 
mportant historical information. It 
was one of their greatest pleasures 
and forms of relaxation. 

Wo do not have quits) so much 
leisure time to-day bui women are 
still aide to enjoy the pleasure of 
•mbroidcry. Thoy like to be abls to 
bring to Ufa copies of ths beauUas of 
nature and to work them into a piece 
of fabrio by using a aeodls. They 




Birthday wishes are extended 
this week to: 

Linda Woolven sUrrie J years 
old on Saturday, Dec. 1, 

Rose Ann MeShane, Sharon, 3 
years old on Saturday Dec 1» 

Marie Anne DeBruyne Mor- 
risbnr*;, 8 years old on Saturday, 
Dec. 1. 

Shirley Ann IieOresley, New- 
market, 12 years old on Monday, 
Dec. 3* 

Carol Anne Moore, Newmar- 
ket, 6 years old on Monday, Dec 

3. 
Shirley Parks, Newmarket, 13 

years old on Monday, Deje. 3. 

Agnes Dion, Aurora 4 years old 
on Monday, Dec. 3. 

Percy James Nolan t Sutton 

Wesf, 6 years old on Tuesday, 

Dec. 4. 

Barbara Norene Brown* Noble- 
ton, 5 years old on Wednesday, 

Dec. 5. 
Joan Smart, Newmarket, 12 

years old on Thursday, Dec. 6. 
Harold Ross Wilkinson, Sharon, 
8 Jrears old on Thursday, Dec. 6. 

Send in your name, address, 
age and become a member of the 
Newmarket Era and Express 
birthday club. 



FINLAY— VANSANT 

Standards of yellow and white 
mums and ferns formed the set- 
ting for a mid-October wedding 
at St. Paul's Anglican church, 
Newmarket, when Althea Vir- 
ginia, daughter^ of Mrs. Althea 
VonSant, Newmarket, became 
the bride of Douglas I. D. Fin- 
lay, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm, 
Finlay, Toronto. Rev. J. Rhodes 
officiated, Mr. Willis played the 
wedding music and Mr. R. J. 
Mawson was soloist. 

Given in marriage by her 
uncle, Mr. Frank F. Courtney, 
the bride was gowned In antique 
ivory satin, made with fitted 
bodice and full gathered skirt 
falling into a train, long pointed 
sleeves of lace and a lace Queen 
Anne collar; Her lace finger- 
tip veil was caught to a satin 
and lace cap, and she carried a 
cascade of\whlte carnations and 
pink delight roses, swansonia, 
and pink and white heather from 
Scotland, 

The mold of honor, Miss Joan 
Hunter, Toronto, wore royal 
blue tissue faille with matching 
veil. Tho bridesmaid, Miss Don- 
alda Kimball, Toronto, wore 
rust with matching veil. Thoy 
carried hand bouquets of yellow I 
mums. 

Miss Lois Barrett, Toronto, 
nieces of the groom, was Junior 
bridesmaid, and wore pnlo pink 
tissue faille and headdress of 
pink roses and mums, and enr- 
ricd a colonial boquet of pink 

rows* and mums. 
The best man was Mr. Wm. 

Finlay of Oshawo, brother of 

the groom. Ushers were Mr. C. 

Barrett, Toronto, and Mr. G. 

Watson, Shuron. 

The reception was In St. Paul's 
pariah hall. For travelling, tho 
bride wore a three-piece navy 
blue suit with navy accessories 
and corsage of white carnations 
and swansonia. 

After a motor trip to tho 
States, Mr. and Mrs. Finlay will 
live In Toronto. 



BE PREPARED FOR 
HOSPITALITY WITH 



BEAVERS HAVE MANY 
REPAIRED TOYS BUT 
NEED PAINT MONEY 

The Busy Beavers, a group of 

youngsters engaged in remodel- 
ling toys for Lions Christmas 
basket gifts and for children in 
hospital, have a large stock pre- 
pared for the coming Christmas 

season. 

In the basement of the resi- 
dence of Harold Tite, Bolton 
Ave., Newmarket, there is a 
great stock of dolls, carriages, 
trucks, wagons and trains. Some 

of the 'stock will have to be mov- 
ed to the United Church base- 
ment next week to make room in 
Mr. Tite's basement which is the 
Beavers* workshop. 

Mr. Tite says that finances for 

paint, sandpaper and brushes 



•XU SenmtkH Kn *a4 Eima*. rtmi*»y, tit. 9, IM1 *■*• M 



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are running low, "We use a 
large amount of paint and sand- 
paper," he said. "Any donations 
to the Busy Beavers for paint 

and paper will be received 
gratefully." There are still 
many old toys which the Beavers 
have collected still to be re- 
paired. 



Prime Minister St. Laurent is 
Canada's 12th holder of that 
office. 






Y«t County Hospital 

in vorm will 




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with lovely women everywhere* 3? i^li 



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aw, lunchion m\M 9 towels snd on 
olotblog* A well-done pl«e U truly 
e thing of bMuty mid inuoh to be 
Admired. You too e*n h4vs this ple*s- 
uit end see for younelf whst fun it is* 
Ths lovely thing* you neks will bs 
useful to you or you esn use tbsm is 
fjUU for your friends. Ths eewing 
sirele le growing. Tbs modern girl fi 
sewing mors sad enjoying rMf 



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minuto of It. 

A pretty hfindker^jlof la a treasure, 
It sdde a bright spot to any costtuno. 
A h&nd-made handkorchiof ii costly 
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much fun to rn&ke* Tlieeo proUy, 
Wmple fioraJ deeigne firvvo a (irofca- 
eiorut look. You can ehoom your own 
colors. The ones plcturcil licro nro 
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yellow, tsngerine, nsaturtlntn^ two 
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esa work the designs on all whito or 
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ED nANDKKKCIUKra, a lonflot 
with detailed InitrucHons ia availuhln. 
Just seed a stamped, self-ndilroAMd 
envelops to thla paper end ask for 

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:ii ^ Our jfXCial- 

CLIFF INSLEt 

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McCAKRICK— C1KAIIAM 

Rov. William Thornloo officU 
ntod at tho ceremony In tho 
United church manse. Zephyr, 
wtivn Daisy I«colu Ornlmm, To- 
ronto, bccutiiu tho hrldo of Tor- 
cnt-tj McCnrriek, Verdun, P.Q. 
The bride is tho daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Dowey Grnhum. Tho 
groom is tho Htm of Mra. Me* 
Cnrrick, Verdun, mid tho late 
Henry McCarriek. 

Given In mnrrlago by hor fa- 
lter, tho lirldo wus ^ownud in 
jirny ehiintllly luce over pink 
taffeta, ftmhlnncd unklo-length 
with u atolu collar effect. She 
wore a pink feather hut and 

curried a nosegay <*f P*" k roses 
and eamutlonK. 

Marny Bmlth attended tho 
bride In phun broendo taffotn 
with » black velvet hnt, and 
carrylnH yellow and mutive 
mums. Harry Moffat was best 

man. 

*. To receive tho gueats at hor 

home, tho bride's mother ehoao 
n navy dress und polo mauve nc- 
ceHHories, with a yellow and 
mauve corwttfo. She wae assisted 
by the ((room's mother Jn navy 
with a pink corsage. 

For travelling the brldo wore 
n coral wool suit trimmed with 
black velvet and blade ueccs* 
sorlea and * muikrat coat. 

Thoy will live In Verdun. 

Prince Edwsrd IsUnd is * pro- 
vince of one dty end seven 

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Three 

In King City Election 

Monday's election at King: town fathers would be to lay 



ROBERT WALKER 

Out, - Fhooe fiC-W 



INSURANCE 

JOHN E, JARVIS 

C«Ujderatioxi Life Association 



I 



Fire. Automobile aad Casualty 

45 Eagle St. Newmarke; 

FiKMMCs: Newmarket UMw 
Albert *417 




WANTED 

Iv,*W Sflfg OF SCKAF 

Atteitioi 

TRUCKERS 

Holiest prices paid for scrap 
sUeL jtast iron, and metals 

S. FREEDMAN AND SON 

6 XOWNSLEY ST. 

Corner old Weston RcL and 

St Clair W. 

Pboue LF. 0661 

TORONTO, ONTARIO 

This ad worth one dollar with 
a load of scrap 



City was proof that it takes a 
small village to put on a "real 
show.'' For the first time in 11 
years voters went to the polls to 
elect three trustees from a slate 
i of five candidates. The village 
j went on its own to hold an elec- 
| tion as there was no concurring 
election for a township council- 
Out of 330 possible voters, 230 
east ballots. 

Other years, civic offices were 
Iheid by acclamation and for the 
' most part it was like '"pulling 
teeth" to get anyone to stand 
for office. It was nearly as dif- 
ficult to interest ratepayers in 
: nominations. But that day is 

! past. The election was as color- 
ful as the candidates themselves. 
The counts of the three elected 
trustees showed *"just how close 
can you get?" 

William Carson, retired farm- 
er, was returned to office for his 

eighth term. He tied with Don- 
ald FindLay* war veteran resi- 
dent at King for less than four 
year, with 158 votes each. Craw- 
ford Wells, general merchant, 
was re-elected for his seventh 
term. He polled 154 votes. 

Defeated were William Bar- 
ker, 108 votes, and James Arm- 
strong, newcomer, 28 votes. 

William Carson, called the 
"Mayor About Town", said he 
did better than he expected in 



sidewalks to the school and re- 
pair old ones. Scarcity and high 
cost of cement was a factor in 
delaying this work- Cement 
prices have now dropped on the 
market Hydro extensions will 
be built in three directions, west 
to Dew's, east tc Brown's and 
north to the school- Eight large 
lights ace ready to be installed 
at the main intersection of the 
village. He says the trustees 
will be prepared to seek action 
on improvement of the fourth 
concession roadway. 

Donald Findlay, staff lawyer 
with McLean-Hunter Publishing* 
Company and president of King, 

Legion branch, states the result 

of the election seems to prove 
what he had previously stated, 
"that the present trustees have 
done a good job but taxpayers 
want to be kept better informed 
on village matters." 

Crawford Wells, engaged in 
village store-keeping from a boy, 
can lay further claim to his 
statement, "that he has been in 
and out of village trusteeship for 
over 20 years." He thinks this 
was a good election and nothing 
wrong with it. He has won his 
bet that Mr. Carson would win 
first place. 

James Armstrong, a King resi- 
dent for less than two years, and 
also a home owner, is as good 
a loser as he would have been a 



the running, but he thought he {winner. "i think there was 

<fi'^,t«f*t "s.^ i« tiw-v„.„ «. An . n «u.a i* . .. - .; * 



would "be in there some place. 
He was well pleased with the 
outcome of the election and the 
magnificent way voters turned 
out. He had not intended to 
stand for candidacy but voters 
pressed him. "I didn't want to 
let them down," he stated. 

Mr. Carson says the future 
looks bright. The first move by 





Grand Champion, Black and White Show 
; Markhara . 

Senior and Grand Champion. Championship Show 
m-i - ^Peterborough .' 

g^ Fed on £uW>-Pep Fitting Ration 

- $V£ ihave been very well satisfied since we started 

feeding" 
Fiil-O-Pep Fitting Ration last winter 







y-- 



BAZII, SUDDABY, Farm Manager. 
CLENCLOSKE* FARMS, Queensviiie, Ontario. 




good community spirit when 
people get out and vote as they 
did. They showed an interest in 
village affairs, never before 
manifested. We will watch the 
activities of the incoming trus- 
tees with keen interest," said Mr. 
Armstrong, congratulating those 
elected. 

While we were not able to 
interview Mr. Barker, we would 
say he will be just as keen in 
the future about village mat- 
ters as he was as a former King 
township councillor. 

Shop Early at Home 

Christmas shopping is well on 
its way and buying is being 
done much earlier than other 
years, local merchants report. 
The only snag they run into is 
the difficulty of replacing some 
of the stock to meet public de- 
mand. 

Bazaar Profits High 

More than $200 was realized 
from the recent bazaar and tea 
given by the W.A. of King 

United church last week. Ex- 
penses were very low and pa- 
tronage was widespread. 

Using 36 cups of flour, home- 
rendered lard and other basic 
ingredients, Mrs. Austin Rumble, 
the president, baked 216 tea bis- 
cuits in the church kitchen for 
the afternoon tea. They were 
served hot from the v/ood stove 
oven, for which she had to im- 
provise grates, for the afternoon 
tea. She stoked the fire with 
cut fence rails, to keep the oven 

j temperature at 450 degrees. It 
took 15 minutes for each lot. 

Folded in dainty baskets for 
serving, the biscuits were ac- 
companied by containers of jam, 
jelly and honey. The tables 
were decorated with Santa Ciaus 
candles- Responsible for the tea 
arrangements were Mrs. Tfaomp- 

json, Mrs. I. L. Scott and Mrs. 

I Geo. Harvey. Other members 
convened the various booths. 

| Church Announcements 
j United church Sunday school 
I on Dec. 24, McDonald and Wells 
J hall. Laskay S. S. Christmas 
tree party will be held on Dec. 
20. Laskay United Y.P.U. will 
hold its Christmas meeting to- 
| morrow night (Dec. 1) at the 
[manse at King. King United 
j church W.M.S. will meet at Mrs. 
; Harvey FollioltV on Dec. J 3. 
| Christmas worship theme and 
i election of officers. Eversley W. 
iM. S. at Mrs. A. Jones, Dec. 12. 
| Election of officers and annual 
reports. All Saints' W.A. at 
Mrs. Eleanor Scott's, election of 
officers, oh Wednesday, Dec. J 2. 
Rev. Mr. Harnett, rector of 
East St. Clement's Anglican 
church, Toronto, will preach at 
the regular morning service at 
All Saints', King, and St. John's 
church, Oak Ridges, Sunday, 
Dec. 9. 

Christmas concerts are being 
arranged in schools and churches 
this month. The combined con- 
cert and tree, of the three Pres- 
byterian congregations, v/iU he 
held at Strange, Dec. 21. Strange 
school will have a vorieiy pro- 
grain including square dances by 
grades 4 and 5, with John Scott, 
aged 11, "calling off", 

Ugioji Election* Occ* 11 

The election for branch otth 



association were the late William 
Walkington, King township, and 
the late Mitchell Hadwen of 
Vaughan. Killing was done on 
the Walkington place for many 
years. Now it is done on Lome 
Scott's farm, 5th line, King. He 
is secretary-treasurer and but- 
cher of the jciub and Wilbert 
Burns is the president. 

The Hadwen family of 
Vaughan have belonged to the 
beefring for 60 yeans. Elmer 
Hadwen. is the grandson of Mit- 
chell, charter member and a 
founder. There will also be 
Camerons, Burns, Scotts and 
many others at the banquet 
table, representing old families 
in the association. 
Escapes Injury in Car Mishap 

Eric B. Johnston of King was 
lucky to escape injury late last 
Friday afternoon when his car 
went into a skid, struck a boul- 
der and turned over in the ditch 
on Eversley sideroad, east of the 

fourth concession line. A mud 
greased spot in the road caused 
the accident, which rolled the 
car on its top and back on the 
right side. Unhurt, he was able 
to climb out on the driver's side. 
The top and side of the car were 
badly damaged. Practicing os- 
teopathy in . Newmarket, Eric 
Johnston was returning home 
from his Water Street office; 
Thanksgiving Theme of 
Eversley WJW.S. 

"As Christians, le\ us never be 
satisfied to use but one talent to 
express thankfulness. Facing a 
pagan world, let us gossip about 
the Christian life, and get back 
to the old fashioned in religious 
thoughts and ways," declared 
Mrs. J, H. Douglas of Oakvilte, 
district vice-president of Section 
1, West Presbyterial, speaking 
on' Thanksgiving at the thank- 
offering meeting of Eversley 
Presbyterian W. M. S., at the 
home of Mrs. T. L. Williams. 
Numbering 40, the gathering 
was made up of Eversley, Ninth 
Line and Strange workers. Mrs. 
Fred Curtis presided. 

Mrs. Douglas was introduced 
by Mrs. Williams, and later Mrs. 
W. R. Adamson. Oakville, senior 
secretary of auxiliaries of the 
Dominion W.M.S. Council, spoke 
of her experience in unveiling 
the memorial tablet of Old Kil- 
donan church, Manitoba, where 
Presbyterionism was first begun 
in the Canadian west. 

The scripture lesson was read 
by Mrs. Williams. Mrs. L. E. 
Rolling gave the general prayer 
and later expressed appreciation 
to the speakers and all who had 
given toward the program. 

The soloists of the afternoon 
were Mrs. Fred Gray of Strange 
auxiliary and Miss Helen Hun- 
ter of Laskay, who was accom- 
panied by Mrs. Len Shropshire. 

The thank offering amounted 
to nearly $33, which, with the 
December offerings, will com- 
plete the year's mission alloca- 
tion of $132. Next meeting, will 
be held a week earlier, . on' Dec. 
12, at the home of Mrs^ Albert 
Jones. Members were remind- 
ed to give donations towards 
a Christmas fund, to combine 
with the W.A. in gifts for the 
York County Home for the 
Aged. Jn the absence of Mrs. J. 
Phillips, the secretary, Mrs. 



Two of the originators of the • Winnif red Boys, .Mrs. Leslie 

Glass, Mrs. Jesse Richards and 
Mrs. Ross Folliott. 

Gift flowers were received 
from Mrs. Frank Marshall, her 
son Aubrey, and Mr. and Mrs. j 
Ross Folliott, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse 
Richards, Reeve Elton Arm- 
strong and Mrs. Armstrong, Mr. 
and Mrs. George Forester, Mrs. 
Freeman Lloyd of Toronto, and 
the congregation of Mount Pis- 
gah United church 

Telegrams of congratulations 
were received by the couple 
from the bride's sister, Mrs. An- 
nie Crawford of Chicago, Ells- 
worth Lloyd, her brother, of 
Champagne, Illinois, and Donald 
Nelson, a grandson. About 75 
cards were received. 

The /reception guests were 
neighbors, friends and relatives 
from Newmarket, Aurora, 
Gormley, Mount Pisgah, Lemon- 
ville and Toronto. Those unable 
to be present were Mrs. Ivan 
Nelson, of Toronto, daughter of 

the Foresters, and the wedding 

attendants, Mrs. J. B. Cross of 
Buffalo, sister of the bride, and 
Mr. Harry Forester, Toronto, 
who was his brother's grooms- 
man. 
Among the gifts were a dinner 

set of Athlone china, given by 
Mr. Forester to his wife; flowers 
from the family, an- electric tri- 
light floor lamp from cousins, 
^and a beautiful guest book made 
by .Mrs. Marshall McMurchy. 

The couple are both 74 years 
of age, and the best wishes of 
the district are extended for 
many long years of useful, hap- 
py life together. 

Miss Carole Muske left King 
on Saturday night for Vancou- 
ver, where she will spend sev- 
eral montlis with her father. 

Mrs. P. Housie of Toronto was 
a weekend guest of Mrs. A. E. 
Kelley. 

Last Wednesday evening Mrs. 
J. L. Scott, Mrs. Leonard Shrop- 
shire and Mrs. Ivan Specht at- 
tended the instaJJr'on of offi- 
cers and banquet of Aloha chap- 
ter of the Easern Star organiza- 
tion at V/illowdale. 

Mrs. A. G. Green, her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Robert Kemp, and 
young son Robbie, of Niagara 
Falls, motored to Belleville for 
the marriage of Miss Lois V/ood, 
a niece of. Mrs. Green, in Tab- 
ernacle United church, Satur- 
day, Nov. 24. 

Green's general store is short- 
handed since Ellen Brown re- 
turned to her position in Au- 
rora. She helps in the store on 
Saturdays and Mrs. George 
Chapman works there three days 
a week. 

Miss Mae Judges won the 
electric heating pad given by 
King. City Cold Storage in the 
lucky draw, ending November. 
Mrs. W. F. V/ood drew the pur- 
chase ticket from the coupon 
box. Mrs. B. Lock hart, King R. 
R. 1, was the winner of the Oc- 
tober draw. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarke Archibald 
and children called on Mrs. 
Frank Wilkins at Oak Ridges on 
Sunday evening. Mrs. Wilkins, 
who is Mrs. Archibald's mother, 
has been laid up for several 
weeks as a result of a full. 

Sunday visitors of Mr. and 
Mrs. Aubrey Campbell on Sun- 
day were Mrs. It. P. iialhday 



-. . •■ :'.".■' * ' ■ •'•■ ■"'••. •'■-•■■ ■-■ */'- * \38 

Kettleby News 



" j The WA. of the KetUeby 

ANSNORVELD United church met in the hall on ( 

Rev. Vanderziel of Chatham Tuesday evening, Nov. 27, with 



conducted the services at the 

Christian Reformed church on 

Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Sneep's in- 
fant son has returned home from 
the Sick Children's hospital. 



Mrs. F. Flach was also well 
enough to return home after be- 
ing in the General hospital in 
Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. Miedema and 
family visited Mr. and Mrs. P. 
Turkstra in Hamilton last Sun- 
day. 

Mr. P. Uitvlugt returned to 
Grand Rapids, U.S.A., to resume 
his studies after spending a few 
days at the home of his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Uitvlugt. 

The P/T.A. will hold its month- 
ly meeting next Friday evening 

at 8 o'clock. •* 



the president, Mrs. L, V. Hea 
cock, in the chair. • She was as- 
sisted In the worship period by 
Mrs. Wm. Hodgson, Mrs. H. 

| Burns and Mrs. E. Blatchford. I 




The November bazaar netted] 



*-* * 



AND SAVE THE 

when you're feeling 








BROWNHILL 

Congratulations to John Fran- 
cis Croutch on the occasion of 
his 95th birthday. He has not 
been really well since his fall 
last winter, but seems to be re- 
gaining strength. Mr. Croutch 
is interested in the ball teams 
and 3s quite proud of Brown Hill 
boys and girls who won the 
shield for Brown Hill school. He 
will be at the home of his son, 
Roy, to receive the many greet- 
ings and guests on Dec, 4, 

Mr. Bruce Longhurst has re- 
turned home from the west, re- 
porting a fine trip. 

Mr. Murray Varney has been 
Jielping at our Sunday school, 
leading the children in choruses. 
Sunday school opens at 2.30, Rev. 
Casement officiating. 

EAST GWILL. COUNCIL 

The council held their first 
meeting in tixe new municipal 
building on Saturday, Dec. 1. 

The reeve, John Rye, in his 
dedication speech, referred to 
the late Orville Briggs, who 
through his generosity, made the 
erection of the new building 
possible. A plaque was placed 
in the hall to his memory. 

The council for 1947, Walter 
Proctor, reeve, Alan Shaw, dep- 
uty-reeve, Councillors Kenneth 
Ross, George Pearson and John 
Rye, established a reserve fund | 
for the purpose of erecting a 
municipal building. 

East Gwillimhury township Is 
the only municipality in Ontario 
to erect a building containing 
offices and council chamber, 
without cost to the ratepayers. 



over $400. Plans were made for I ftl T |D"Ufl &t f M ILUl If 
serving a turkey supper which (jLulK fM3|£ AWflf 

is being sponsored by the com- 
munity club. 

In the absence <of Mrs. C. 
Black, her topic was read by 
Mrs F. Curtis, who spoke on 
Christmas carols, and hymns. 

Mr. J. Hummel conducted the 
election of officers for 1052, and 
the following were elected: hon. 
pres., Mrs. J. Hummel; pres., 
Mrs. L. V. Heacock; 1st vice- 

pres., Mrs. C. Black; 2nd vice- 
pres., Mrs. C. Tilson; secretary, 
Mrs. H. Burns; asst. sec, Mrs. N. 
Blatchford; 

Corr. sec., Mrs. A. Marshall; 
treas., Mrs. M; Cook; parsonage 
com., Mrs. F. Curtis, Mrs. W, 
Sabin; flower com., Mrs. A. Mc- 
Cluskie, Mrs. E. Blatchford, Mrs. 
S. Heacock; 

Card com., Mrs. J. Lepard, 

Mrs. C. Black, Mrs. J. Macdon- 
ald, Mrs. R. Jew it t; pianist, Mrs. 
H. Webster, asst. pianist, Mrs. 
B. Wood; press corres., Mrs. G. 
Camboume. 

The Christ church congrega- 
tional supper and Sunday school 
tree will be held in the parish 
hall on Friday^ Dec. 1, at 6.30 
p.m. 

On Sunday, Dec. 9, at the 
evening service, at 7.30, Dr. Ar- 
cher Wallace will be the guest 

speaker in Kettleby United 

church. 



■i 



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V 



Oct rid of body WMlea anil «e Ifcir 

tjuitkly "logy" ft-elings due to poor. 
elimination give way to sparkling pep 
and xest! These cntrRy-robbing wastes . ■ 
iicvumulnfe not only from eluggxshnea* ; 
of iKe alimentary canal, where your 
food digests— hut also us a result of. 
luxy kidney Action. Millions of people, 
all over the world have found Krtucnen 
Salts to be a useful corrective, for 
such troubles. Why 7 Moralise Kruschea 
is both laxative and diuretic — it 
promotes healthy action in Ixrweb xn<\ 
kidneys. Gently but thoroughly, Ja?t 
a little Kruschen with your morning 
beverage when needed help; yon !t£»p 
thoroughly clean inside . . . "on top ot 
the ball" all day, every day I 



;. . 



. •, . 



KRUSCHEN 
SALTS 



AT AUMM $TMB 



? • * \ ' 



■ 



TO THE VOTERS Of KING COT 

wish to express ny aopreditien 
I received at I 

te voters I wffl 




ules of the meeting. 
Brother Dies Suddenly 

Mrs. E!ia*s Bice and husband 
were called to Novar, Ont., on 
Saturday, Nov. 24, with news 
of the death of Adam Coulter, 
57, a brother of Mrs. Bice, who 
dropped dead on the highway 
three miles north of Ifuntsvillc, 

as a result of a heart seizure. 

Mr. Coulter, his wife and young 
son were motoring home from 
Hunts vilic in the afternoon, 
when he was seized with pain 
while at the wheel. 

The funeral service wi»s held 
on Monday and interment was 
in Hutchinson Memorial come- 
tcry at Huntsviiic. Mr. Coulter 
was a veteran of the fir*t war. 
He is survived by his wife und 
eight children, his 'Hfi-ycar-old 
mother, Mrs. Coulter <t Oak- 
wood, and six sisters. . ' '- 
Sister Passes Away 

Mrs. James Patlon of King 
was bereaved hist Week hi the 
death of hut staler, Mm, Ciiarles 
Kerr, of Toronto, who passed; 
away on Nov. 28 following a 
long period of poor health. The 
fiintr:*} service was held In To- 
ronto and interment made Jn 

V/oodbridgc cemetery. Resides 

Mrs. Patlon, there are four eta* 
tors of the Jarrclt family and » 
brother, (.'has, JuitcU, Toronto, 
.surviving, In Toronto are fffft 
Mabel Malhewson, Mrs. Hay 
Jfollvy and Mrs. Jus. HcroViIu. 
Attending I ho funeral last Fri- 
day from hero were Mr, find 
Mrs. Jas. fat too, Kwnrl am) 

Audrey ftitton, and Mr*, Jack 
Walker. 

Mr. and Mra. Wilbur* Ifudwtm 

. <»f Peltevllli) veiled Mr, nut) 

eers for 1052 ot King Ixtglon, ,«fi& Jihm.r Ihalwon, his pnwjit*, 

Tuesday, ot Maple during IJw wcukond, 



Rhoda Farren recorded the min-land daughter Jane, and Miss 



Bessie Forgie, of Toronto. 

Miss Shirley Campbell, King- 
horn, will become the bride of 
Allan Crossley, late in Decem- 
ber. The daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Earl Campbell, Shirley is 
on the staff of the Women's Col- 
lege Hospital, Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. K. Ross vis- 
ited the la iter's sister, Mrs. Dan 
Malloy of Noblelon, on Sunday. 

Miss Freeda Farley, teacher of 
Strange school, speut the wcek- 



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43%, will be field on 
Di.c. J I, at the home of Coin- 
wdo Findlay. A jfitlu of um- 
dlduh-s were uwuJnuted on Nov, 
W and further nominations may 
he made at the election meeting. 
Donald Findlay h the president. 

httf King m Vtor» Old 

King pud Vaughan Townlfne 
Ikof Nina v/iil celebrate 60 years 
organisation tonight (Thursday) 
at a turkey banipjet, at All 
r>alntV Anglican church, served 
by Iho WA. It is oxpuctcd that 
20 shareholders and families and 
many former members of the 
Hsariciatlon will attend, making 
tip HJO places at the 'Tanners* 
style supper," 

Present wilt fco William Mc- 
Kay, 77, of King district who 
at© roost beef from the first 
young huHock slaughtered by 

the Ring in June, 1801, He is the 
only person who c*n say thU, 

H wWi I com m mest like 
it today, I hav« mver taten 

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and his sfstw, Mrs. )ftiro|d Kir- 

by, at Kiitjf. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hoy Richard* of 
Simcoe spent tho weekend' at 
(lie hufui? of Mr. and Mrs. M 
Hkhrirds. Roy h Ihn nsslsliini 
agricultural represtmlalivti In 
Norfolk County. 

fluJjitti Wedding Anniversary 

Mr. and Mrs. Percy Fore*tor 
received 80 friends at fhiilr 
homo, sixth line, on Wednesday 
afternoon and uvonhoj, Nov. SMI, 
in ccfc)>rntion u! their goldoii 
wedding annivcrstiry. Mm For- 
ester wore filuck will) wliito 

Irlm, and a u>rsa«c of yellow 
I why mums. Assisting was bar 
daughter-in-law, Mrs. Mwuq 
Forester, wearing light Wito 
crcoo and corsage. BoucjuoM of 
yellow chrysonthcmunui decor- 
ated the house and centred tho 
tea table, where Mrs.; ?nt\k 
Marshall presided during the 

Os* | aidge« poured ttg % th» 
•vtnte* toting w «it m» 



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end at her home in Bradford. 
Attend Farmers' Hunt Ball 

A great many couples from 
Laskay, Strange, Eversley and 
other neighboring districts were 
present at the 31st annual Far- 
mers* Hunt Ball, sponsored bv 
Toronto and North York Hunt 
Club at Aurora high school last 
Friday evening. A stage show 
was provided by entertainers 
from Western Technical School, 
and bingds* and moving pictures 
were provided in class rooms. 
The guests were received by 
Lady Eaton and Clifford Siftou. 

Square dancing was held to 
the music of Art West's orches- ' 
Ira, and Mr. Tom McClure was 
the *M.€. The annual event is 
given for farmers whose pro- 
perties are utilized by the Hunt 
Club throughout the season. Tho 
guests numbered nearly 2,000 
this year. Refreshments wore 
provided by the Hunt Club and 
served by the ladies of Aurora 
Anglican church. 



VOTBS 



I wish to express 
turiHHito 



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TO THE 

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AUTOMATIC 

At flmoi You Snlfici 

SnoiMtoo oil porcelain litiaulfj^^' 
MUt umldnt pbi<«loln on lOR'^S 
fmh 5 lwo| encioioil ahtmanitf 21 
y««/ «uorqnl«n». \m on lor qjny 
(iaoolng » . . Ijlio Imgo ^wr», 
tl^fOwQMy Flbregloi'?niiihilti(l-V : t i 
Stoplno <«iy«vlow iwllch-potitlt :' 

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